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BULLETIN 



OF 

\ 



Lh^ State Normal School 



ATHENS, GEORGIA 




Thirty-first Annual Session, 1924-1925 

MARCH, 1924 
■ 



Issued Quarterly by the State Normal School 



Entered at the Post Office at Athens, Ga., as Second Class Matter, November, 8th. 1913 
Under Act of Congress of July, 1893 



Vol. 11 Serial No. 22 No. 1 




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CALENDAR, 1924-25 



1924 

. >t. 3iul, Tuesday — School Dormitories open. 
J« >t. 2nd, Tuesday — Classification of Students. 

>t. 3rd, Wednesday — Classification of Students. 
O jk 4th, Thursday — Fall Term begins. 

. ?. \ hristmas Holidays begin. 

(Recitations end Wednesday, December 17th). 

£ 1925 

III 

^ i. 6th, Tuesday — Re-opening of School. 

_ r. 17th, Thursday — Founders Day. 

y 24th, Sunday — Sommencement Sermon, at 11:00 A. M. 

> y 25th, Monday — Annual Concert, at 8:00 P. M. 

^ y 26th, Tuesday — Annual Meeting of Board of Trustees, 10 A. M. 

C* y 27th, Wednesday — Graduating Exercises, 8:00 P. M. 

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^ view students may enter at any time during the year, but it i- 

Z t for them to enter September 2nd or January 6th. 

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BOARD OF TRUSTEES AND OFFICERS 



B. S. MILLER, Columbus, Ga President 

Members ex-officio 

Governor Clifford M. Walker Atlanta, Ga. 

State Superintendent of Schools, N. H. Ballard Atlanta, Ga. 

Chancellor, University of Georgia, David C. Barrow Athens, Ga. 

Members-at-Large 

Mrs. W. W. Stark Commerce, Ga. 

Mrs. J. E. Hayes Montezuma, Ga. 

Members City of Athens 

A. H. Davison Athens, Ga. 

Mrs. Julia Ashton White Athens, Ga. 

Members Representing Trustees of University of Georgia 

Judge Loyd Cleveland Griffin, Ga. 

H. J. Rowe Athens, Ga. 

Howell Erwin Athens, Ga. 

.Members Representing Congressional Districts 

First District, Joseph W. Smith Reidsville, Ga. 

Second District, W. V. Custer Bainbridge, Ga. 

Third District, J. M. Collum Americus, Ga. 

Fourth District, B. S. Miller Columbus, Ga. 

Fifth District, Mrs. Howard McCall Atlanta, Ga. 

Sixth District, Frank F. Jones Macon, Ga. 

Seventh District, Mrs. Annie Freeman Johnson Rome, Ga. 

Eighth District, S. B. Yow Lavonia, Ga. 

Ninth District, L. M. Brand Lawrenceville, Ga. 

Tenth District, Mrs. Ira E. Farmer Thomson, Ga. 

Eleventh District, Jerome Crawley Waycross, Ga. 

Twelfth District, Judge W. W. Larsen Dublin, Ga. 

Secretary and Treasurer 
G. A. Mell Athens, Ga. 



COMMITTEES 



Salaries — Rowe, Barrow, Collum, Brand, Custer, McCall, Johnson, 
Hayes. 

Prudential — Ballard, Barrow, Rowe, Davison, White. 

Legislative — Cleveland, Custer, Stark, Hayes, McCall, Crawley. 

Uniform — Brand, Yow, McCall. 

Teachers and Course of Study — Ballard, Yow, Crawley, Smith, 
Jones, Collum, White, Stark, Hayes. 

Finance — Brand, Davison, Cleveland, Custer, Farmer, Johnson. 

Laws and Regulation — Cleveland, Rowe, Larsen, Jones, Farmer, 
Smith. 

Buildings and Grounds — Barrow, Yow, Smith, Rowe, Collum, White, 
Larsen, Stark. 






STATE NORMAL SCHOOL 

OFFICERS AND FACULTY 



DAVID C. BARROW, LL.D Chancellor Ex-Officio 

Chancellor of the University of Georgia. 

JERE M. POUND, A.B., LL.D President 

A. RHODES Business Manager 

H. B. RITCHIE Dean 

Mrs. H. C. DOOLITTLE Registrar 

MISS EMMIE JONES Bookkeeper 

G. A. MELL Secretary and Treasurer 



MISS ELEANOR ADAMS, / 
Critic Teacher. 
MRS. GERTRUDE A. ALEXANDER, A.M., 

Expression; Assistant in English. 

MISS FRANCES RANDOLPH ARCHER, ' 

Librarian. 

MRS. J. W. BAILEY 

Assistant in Piano Department, 

MISS BESS M. BAIRD, 

Household Arts. 

MISS-' ESTHER BENSON, 

Public School Music. 

MRS. G. A. BROADHURST, 

Critic Teacher. 
PETER F. BROWN, A.M., 

English. 

MISS MaNITA BULLOCH, 

Assistant, Oratory. 

MISS IRIS CALLAWAY, B.S., 

Assistant in Department of Mathematics 

MRS. LENA CHANDLER 

Housekeeper. 

MISS LUCILE CHARLTON, 

Critic Teacher. 

MISS CARRIE CLAY, 

Assistant, English Department. 

MISS NELLIE COLBERT, 

Matron. Gilmer Hall. 

MRS. A. J. CONYERS, 

Trained Nurse. 



STATE NORMAL SCHOOL 

W. L. COOKSEY, 

Farm Superintendent. 

MISS KATIE DOWNS, 

Critic Teacher. 

WILLIAM T. DUMAS, A.M., 

Mathematics. 
DAVID L. EARNEST, A.M., 

Science. 

MRS. AGNES EBERHARDT, 

Piano. 

MISS LAURA ELDER, 

Teacher of Rural School. 

MISS LUCY GRIFFITH, 

Assistant Librarian and Stenographer. 

MISS EDITH GUILL, 

Assistant in Department of Physical Education. 

MISS IRMA HICKS, 

Assistant in Department of Household Arts. 

MISS KATE HICKS, 

Principal Elementary School. 

MISS ROBERTA HODGSON, A.M.,' 

History. 

SCOTT HOLLAND, 

Assistant, Romance Languages. 

MISS ANNIE MAE HOLLIDAY, 1~ \ 

Assistant in Department of Manual Arts- 

MISS RUTH KLEIST, > 06* 

Assistant in Household Arts Department. 

MRS. MAGGIE LAMBDIN, 

Matron, Bradwell Hall. 

MISS ANNIE LINTON, ' 

Manual Arts. 

JOSEPH LUSTRAT, LL.D., Officer d'Academie, 

Romance Languages. 

MISS ANNIE V. MASSEY, 1 1 

Critic Teacher. 

MISS LOUISE McCAMMON, 

Assistant in Science Department. 

MISS MOINA MICHAEL, 

Y. W. C. A. Secretary; Matron, Winnie Davis Hall. 



MRS. FRANK OSTERMANN, 
Critic Teacher. 



V 



8 STATE NORMAL SCHOOL 

H. B. RITCHIE, A.M., 

Education. 

E. S. SELL, M.S.Agr., 

Agriculture and Rural iSocial Science. 

J. H. SIMS, 

Engineer. 

MISS INEZ SPARKS, 

Critic Teacher. 

MJSS HELEN L. SPROUT, "'"•' 3 

Latin and Greek. ■ 

Director of Correspondence Course. 

MISS LURA B. STRONG, 

Physical Education. 

J. R. THAXTON, 

Assistant, Romance Languages. 

MISS LILLIE THOMPSON, 

Assistant in Department of Household Arts. 

MISS CAROLYN VANCE, B.L.I. , 

Oratory. 

MISS ALICE WALKER, 

Critic Teacher. 

MISS SARAH WEBB, Ph.B., 

Assistant in Department of Education. 

MISS ESTHER WOLLA, 

Assistant in Household Arts Department. 

MISS MARY M. WOODS, L.B., 

Assistant in Department of Agriculture and Rural Social Science. 

MISS MAY ZEIGLER, A.M., 

Assistant in Department of Education. 



STATE NORMAL SCHOOL 



FACULTY COMMITTEES, 1924-25 

Library: Archer, Hicks, Sprout, Brown, Hodgson, Zeigler. 

Calendar and Entertainments: Linton, Eberhardt, Michael, Rhodes, 
Callaway, Clay. 

Schedule: Alexander, Callaway, Ritchie, Sell, Dumas. 

Promotion and Publicity: Sell, Earnest, Holliday. 

Curriculum: Brown, Ritchie, Alexander, Sell, Linton, Baird, Sprout, 
Dumas, Strong. 

Publication: Sell, Brown, Holliday. 

School Organizations: Ritchie, Strong, Sell, Earnest, Michael, Col- 
bert. 

Classification: Dumas, Brown, Ritchie, Sell, Alexander, Callaway, 
Webb. 

Alumi-ae: Hicks, Callaway, Clay, Guill, Webb, Walker, Downs, 
Adams. 

Welfare: Rhodes, Conyers, Strong, Baird, and Matrons. 

Grounds and Buildings: Rhodes, Sell, Hicks, Lambdin, Colbert. 

Employment: Earnest, Hicks, Ritchie, Baird. 

Records: Dumas, Webb, Linton, Holliday, Sprout, Guill, Wolla, 
Kleist. 

Uniform: Baird, Thompson, Archer, Strong. 

Absence: Earnest, Webb, Dumas. 



10 STATE NORMAL SCHOOL 

HISTORICAL 



The Trustees of the University of Georgia donated to the State 
the building known as Rock College and from six to ten acres of 
land contiguous thereto, together with the late George R. Gilmer 
fund. Under the condition of Governor Gilmer's will, this sum 
must be used to train teachers in the elementary branches of an 
English education only. The condition attached to these gifts of 
the Trustees of the University was that the State should establish 
at Rock College a Normal School for the education and training of 
teachers for the rural schools. 

An Act was passed by the Legislature of Georgia in 1891: 

"To establish, organize and maintain a State Normal School as a 
branch to the University, to appropriate money for the same, and 
for other purposes." This Act received the approval of the Gov- 
ernor, October 21, 1891. By the provision of this Act, the State 
received from the Trustees of the University, as a donation for the 
purpose of establishing a Normal School, the building known as 
Rock College and a tract of land of not less than six nor more 
than ten acres upon which the college building stood, lying just 
outside the limits of the City of Athens, Ga. The Act also pro- 
vided for a Normal School Commission, consisting of the State 
School Commissioner, who should be the Chairman, the Chancellor 
of the University, and "three citizens of Georgia, experienced in 
teaching, to be appointed by the Governor." 

It is interesting to note that the water used by the School came 
from a well, and the water was declared to be pure and wholesome 
and was so cold that no ice was needed. 

The lower floor of Rock College was divided into lecture rooms, 
restaurant, hall and assembly rooms. The second and third floors 
were used as a dormitory. These rooms were furnished by the 
appropriation of $500.00 from the City Council of Athens in 1892, 
with wire cots, tables, chairs, buckets and other necessary articles 
of furniture. 

The Act creating the State Normal School was passed in 1891, 
and short sessions of the school were held during the summer 
months of 1892, 1893 and 1894. The Commission had at its com- 
mand only the interest of the Gilmer fund which was transferred 
for safe keeping to the Trustees of the University by the Trustees 
of the estate of the late George R. Gilmer. The interest on this 
fund amounted to $1,050.00 a year, from which a commission of 
$50.00 a year was deducted for the expenses of administration. In 
1892 there were added to this, the Peabody Institute fund of 



STATE NORMAL SCHOOL 11 

$800.00, and the County Institute fund of five counties, which met 
at Rock College for one week, and amounted to $125.00. There- 
fore, the School was carried on in 1893 with the sum of $1,923.00. 

The session of 1892 began July 11th, and lasted seven weeks. 
Exclusive of the attendance during the County Institute week, the 
roll of students numbered 112, representing thirty-two counties. 

So far as the resources of the college for the year 1893 are con- 
cerned, they are best explained by an extract from the minutes of 
the Commission at their meeting in Atlanta, April 1, 1893: 

"The Chairman made a statement of the efforts that had been 
made to induce the Legislature to appropriate a sum of money for 
the permanent establishment of a State Normal School, and stated 
that the Legislature had failed to make an appropriation for the 
purpose named. Dr. William E. Boggs then stated that the net 
interest on the Gilmer fund, amounting to $1,000.00, would be 
available on the first day of July. He said, also that the people of 
Athens were desirous of having the Normal School operated during 
the coming summer, 1893, and that the grand jury of Clarke county 
had, at his request, made an appropriation of $400 for the pur- 
pose. The citizens of Athens had also made up a private subscrip- 
tion of $537 to be added to the fund. These resources, added to- 
gether, made a total of $1,937 for the summer session of 1893." 

The private subscriptions from the citizens of Athens were se- 
cured by Dr. Edwin D. Newton and Mr. T. W. Reed. This must 
have been a tedious undertaking, for many of the subscriptions 
only amounted to fifty cents. 

The session of 1893 began July 5th, and lasted six weeks. There 
were enrolled 116 students from thirty-five counties. These pupils 
were not all present at the same time. Some came for a week, 
others for two weeks, others for a month, while many remained dur- 
ing the entire session. 

The nature of the work done during the sessions of 1892 and 
1893, the enthusiasm of the students, the apparent demand for an 
enlarged and well-equipped Normal School, induced the Normal 
School Commission to appeal to the Legislature of 1893 for an 
appropriation to remodel, equip, and operate the State Normal 
School. The Legislature, however, took no action in the matter, 
and the Normal School Commission was again left with limited 
means to carry out the provisions of the Act creating the School. 

A meeting of the State Normal School Commission was held in 
Atlanta to take into consideration the work of the School for the 
summer of 1894. 

The Chairman of the Commission stated that the Legislature had 
made no appropriation for the support of the School during the 



12 STATE NORMAL SCHOOL 

year of 1894, and that the only money available was the interest on 
the George R. Gilmer fund. 

After some discussion, the Commission decided to open the col- 
lege for a month during the summer of 1894, and the following 
resolution was passed: 

"Resolved, That the State Normal School at Rock College be 
opened for one month during the summer of 1894, beginning from 
the 17th day of July, and that the interest on the Gilmer fund, 
accruing July 1st, be used for defraying the expenses of the ses- 
sion." 

Another resolution was also passed and was as follows: 

"Resolved, That the Normal School Commission, recognizing the 
generosity of the grand jury of Clarke county, the City Council and 
citizens of Athens in the aid they have hitherto given the Normal 
School, and fully grateful for their past favors, yet in view of the 
urgent necessities of the School, respectfully suggest to the grand 
jury that an appropriation for the year 1894 would greatly aid in 
continuing the prosperity and insuring the success of the Normal 
School." 

"Resolved, That Dr. William E. Boggs, Professor David Barrow, 
Jr., be requested to present this resolution to the next session of 
the grand jury." 

The grand jury received the resolutions, and in their present- 
ments made an appropriation of $750.00 to the State Normal 
School, provided a session of eight weeks was held. This provision 
was cheerfully agreed to by the Commission, and the day of open- 
ing of the Normal School for 1894 was changed from July 17th, 
to July 5th. 

The State Normal School enrolled 175 students during the sum- 
mer of 1894. Fifty-one counties were represented in this student 
body. 

The success of the summer session under the direction of Mr. 
Lawton B. Evans made a permanent Normal School a necessity and 
the Legislature of 1894 gave financial assistance to the School and 
fixed the annual appropriation at ten thousand dollars. 

It was peculiarly fitting that Captain S. D. Bradwell was chosen 
as the first president of the State Normal School, after it was per- 
manently established. Probably no man had done more for the 
teachers of the State, and no one understood their needs better, 
or sympathized with them in their work more. He was possessed 
with a remarkable memory for names and faces, and while State 
School Commissioner, he probably knew more men in Georgia than 
any other man. This fact was an invaluable aid to Captain Bradwell 
in getting the School established. 



STATE NORMAL SCHOOL 13 

The school was opened April 17, 1895. The 17th of April was 
observed as Founder's Day for many years in the school and appro- 
priate exercises were conducted. Miss Mamie Mathews of Ogle- 
thorpe county was the first student to register in the school. The 
attendance during the spring was very small, but the summer 
months brought a much large enrollment. 

Captain S. D. Bradwell tendered his resignation as President of 
the School at a meeting of the Commission held March 7, 1901. 
Mr. E. C. Branson was elected to succeed Captain Bradwell. Cap- 
tain Bradwell had been President since the permanent organization 
of this institution in 1895, during the short period of six years, 
under his administration the School was organized and had grown 
to such an extent that the annual enrollment was well above six 
hundred. 

In 1912 President E. C. Branson resigned to accept the head of 
the department of Rural Economics and Sociology, and Mr. Jere 
M. Pound was elected President. 

1. Gilmer Hall. 

This building was erected in 1860 by the University of Georgia 
and was donated to the State Normal School in 1891. At first the 
Normal School was completely housed in this one building but it is 
now used exclusively as a dormitory. It was named for Governor 
Gilmer, as the income from a fund left by his will was used to help 
found the State Normal School. 

2. Bradwell Hall. 

In 1896 this building was completed as a two-story structure and 
the third floor was added in the following year, and was made pos- 
sible through subscriptions by the teachers in the school. At first, 
part of the lower floor was used as a dining hall and the other part 
of the building was used as a dormitory for young men. It is used 
entirely now as a girls' dormitory. It was named for the first presi- 
dent of the school. 

.'{. Old Auditorium. 

In 189 8 from appropriations of tl\at year, the commission au- 
thorized the erection of this building. It is two stories high, with 
an auditorium on the first floor and class-rooms above. 

4. Winnie Davis .Memorial Hall. 

The Daughters of the Confederacy planned this building to per- 
petuate the memory of Winnie Davis, daughter of Jefferson Davis, 
and it was through their efforts that this hall was built. It was 
completed In 1902 and is used as a dormitory. Various Chapters 



14 STATE NORMAL SCHOOL 

of the Daughters of the Confederacy maintain rooms in the build- 
ing and make appointments of the students to occupy the rooms. 
Rooms are secured in the building by applying to Chapters who 
have furnished the different rooms. 

5. Muscogee Elementary Training School. 

George Foster Peabody gave the money to build and equip this 
building and it was completed in 1902. A well organized school of 
seven grades is carried on in this building to give the Senior class 
practice in teaching before they are allowed to graduate. The 
building was so named because Muscogee is Mr. Peabody's native 
county. 

6. Smith Building. 

This building was completed in 1906. It was made possible 
through gifts by James M. Smith, George Foster Peabody, the 
State, Faculty, and a number of small contributors. It contains 
class-rooms and the administrative offices, and was named for the 
late James M. Smith. 

7. Dining Hall. 

The dining hall was also completed in 1906. The first floor of 
this building is used as a dining hall while the second floor is 
known as Senior Hall and is used as a dormitory. 

8. Carnegie Library. 

This building was given by Andrew Carnegie to the State Nor- 
mal School and is of course used as a library. It contains about 
ten thousanad volumes, and was erected in 1910. 

9. The Rural School. 

This is a modern one-room rural school building on the campus 
to give the Seniors practice in teaching in a country school. The 
building is well lighted and heated and complete in every detail. 
The children come from the country, thus making it a rural school 
from every point of view. It was built in 1911. 

10. Dairy Rain. 

This structure is of concrete, modern and sanitary in every way, 
with a large silo made at one end. It was built in 1914 and is 
large enough to accommodate seventy cows. The school farm is 
located on the Oconee river three miles from town. This farm 
was purchased, equipped, and is operated without a cent from the 
State. 



STATE NORMAL SCHOOL 15 

11. Infirmary. 

The infirmary was built in 1916 as a result of the efforts of the 
I Elijah Clarke Chapter of the Daughters of the American Revolu- 
tion, although the funds were furnished by this Chapter in co- 
i operation with the General Assembly. 

12. Practice Home. 

This building was used as an infirmary until the new one was 
built in 1916. It was converted into the practice home where the 
students get practice in home making, thus putting into practice 
things studied in the class-room. 

13. Miller Hall. 

With an appropriation from the State this dormitory was com- 
pleted in 1917. This is a two-story structure and is modern in 
every respect. It is named in honor of Mr. B. S. Miller, President 
of the Board of Trustees. 

14. Pound Auditorium. 

This building was also finished in 1917, as an appropriation 
amounting to $100,000 from the State was sufficient to build Mil- 
ler Hall and the Pound Auditorium. It has an auditorium that 
will seat 2,500 people; as well as a number of class-rooms and 
offices. This auditorium is named for the President of the School. 



GENERAL CONDITIONS OF ADMISSION 

The purpose of this school is to "educate and train teachers for 
the common schools of Georgia." The terms of admission are as 
follows: 

First: The applicant must be sufficiently mature and sufficiently 
well prepared to undertake the work of the school successfully. All 
students, when admitted are considered upon probation at all times: 
and, when unwilling or unable to do the work required, they will 
be privately counseled to withdraw. 

Second: This institution is a vocational school, not a reforma- 
tory. We have no punishments. All trifling with rules and regu- 
lations or careless, indifferent, and improper conduct will subject 
the offender to the necessity of withdrawing. Only students with 
a serious purpose are desired; and only such will be permitted to 
remain. Students in training are supposed to be mature enough 
to be responsible and our dealings are with them, not with their 
parents. 

Third: Good .Moral Character. Every student will be required to 



16 STATE NORMAL SCHOOL 

hand to the President a letter of recommendation from some re- 
sponsible party in the home neighborhood. 

Fourth: Good Health. This school is delightfully situated in the 
Piedmont Hills. The conditions of health here cannot be sur- 
passed. But in order to protect our students as carefully as pos- 
sible we have always on duty nurses of the very highest training, 
whose business will be to constantly inspect the dormitories and 
to examine all the students personally for all evidences of sickness 
and ill health. 

Fifth: Applicants for admission to the school must bring a letter 
from the home physician certifying that the applicant is in sound 
health and has not been exposed to any contagious disease within 
the previous thirty days. See blank for this purpose, next to last 
page. This letter must be presented upon arrival. 

Sixth: Successful vaccination is also another absolutely neces- 
sary condition of entrance. All students upon arrival will have 
their arms examined by a physician; and if they do not have a 
satisfactory scar, they must be vaccinated at once before they can 
be admitted to the school. In all cases it is better for applicants 
to be vaccinated before coming here, provided it can be done with 
fresh, pure vaccine points. 

These last two conditions are so imperative, and will be adhered 
to so rigidly, that the applicant who neglects them will be neces- 
sarily subjected to great trouble in entering the school. Plainly 
and emphatically, these things must not be neglected by any appli- 
cant. 

Registering. 

Upon reaching the school, the student should go at once to the 
office of the Registrar and fill out a registration blank properly. 
This blank is then taken to the Dormitory Manager's office where 
a Dormitory Room Ticket will be obtained. All moneys and fee§ 
should at once be paid at this office and receipts secured for same. 

The Classification Committee will meet the students in various 
class-rooms for all assignments. A directory of where these com- 
mittees may be( found will be posted in conspicuous places in the 
corridors of the academic buildings. In order to be properly classi- 
fied at once, the student should bring letter of introduction, health 
certificate, and all reports from former schools and teachers. 

I Warding Department. 

All dormitories are steam-heated, with toilet rooms and bath 
on every floor abundantly supplied with hot and cold water. They 
are comfortable, pleasant, and healthful homes for the students. 



STATE NORMAL SCHOOL 17 

All of our dormitories are the equal of the best dormitories in all 
matters of convenience and comfort. Students in each dormitory 
are under the care of a resident matron, who looks after their 
needs and comforts. The dining hall is well equipped. 

Board in the dormitories includes room, table fare, heat, lights, 
and attendants for the rougher work. 

Each student will pay for, and look after her own laundering, 
with the assistance of the matron in charge. 

Each student must bring a pillow, pillow-cases, bed-clothes (in- 
cluding at least one white spread), towels, hair-brush and comb, 
and other personal toilet articles; also a bath-robe, bed-room slip- 
pers, overshoes, wrap and umbrella. 

Each student should bring also one cup and saucer, one dinner 
plate, one knife, fork and teaspoon, for personal use in the dormi- 
tories, when such things are necessary. It is against the rules 
for any student to carry out or borrow dishes and silver from the 
dining-room. 

Male students do not room in the dormitories. Rooms are rented 
for them near the campus and paid for by the school. Such stu- 
dents pay the same rate for board as outlined in the catalogue, 
furnishing bedding, etc., just as the girls do. 

Parents and friends visiting students cannot be accommodated 
in the dormitories, as there is no room for them. They can secure 
board in the city. 

Assignment of Rooms. 

Rooms are not assigned until the opening of school in the fall. 
This work cannot be done during the summer, except the rooms in 
the Winnie Davis Memorial Hall and these are secured through 
various Chapters of the Daughters of the Confederacy. Students 
• that arrive on the first day of the opening of school have a better 
chance of securing rooms where they want them. 

Expenses. 

Terms for board (payable in advance, as indicated). 

Sept. 2nd, 1924 — First payment ! $ 37.50 

Nov. 4th, 1924 — Second Payment 37.50 

Jan. 27th, 1925 — Third Payment 37.50 

Mar. 24th, 1925 — Fourth Payment 37.50 

$150.00 
Matriculation Fee (to-be paid on entrance) 10.00 

Board for students who do not make the quartely payments as 



18 STATE NORMAL SCHOOL 

indicated above, will be at the rate of $4.50 per week, $1.00 per 
day. 

All students entering before September 15th, will be charged 
from date of opening (Sept. 2nd). Those entering on, and after 
Sept. 15th, will be charged from the date they enter school. 

No tuition is paid by Georgia students. Students from outside 
the State are required to pay $40.00 per year; $20.00 upon en- 
trance, and $20.00 at the beginning of the second semester. 

If advisable at any time to raise or lower the rates for board or 
matriculation fee, the right to do so is reserved. 

Money deposited on dormitory account will not be refunded. 

Money deposited on personal account may be withdrawn at any 
time. No part of the Matriculation fee will be refunded for any 
reason. 

Checks for board or tuition should not be made payable to the 
President, but to the student. 

Students must supply their own text-books. Books will be fur- 
nished at publishers' prices with cost of handling added. A second- 
hand book-store is also operated for the benefit of the students, 
who wish to buy or sell second-hand books. 

The school has a farm of 215 acres, which is well equipped to 
furnish supplies for the dining-room. 

Uiiifonus. 

To promote economy, simplicity, and good taste in dress, every 
young woman in the school, unless especially excused by the Presi- 
dent, is required to purchase and wear the uniform adopted by the 
school. Requests to be excused from wearing the uniform will not 
be considered except for very exceptional and unusual reasons. 

The uniform consists of the following articles: 

For church and street wear — a blue serge suit and cap, \vhit«§ 
waist, tan gloves, black shoes and hose. 

For class room wear — a blue serge suit skirt, uniform waist of 
white poplin, blue Windsor tie. 

For summer and evening wear — a white poplin wash skirt and 
white waist. 

The suit, cap, gloves, white skirts and tie may be ordered by mail 
before the student leaves home. Unless placed in advance, the order 
must be given immediately upon arrival at the school. The white 
waists for school, church, and evening wear must be made of the 
material and according to the patterns designated in the accom- 
panying leaflet giving detailed descriptions. 

The above requirements will be rigidly enforced. There must 
be no attempt at evasion or partial violation of these regulations. 



STATE NORMAL SCHOOL 19 

No other articles, however similar can be substituted for those 
specified. 

Students are expected to wear the uniform at all times both on 
and off the campus. They need not bring to the school dresses of 
other kinds, for it is desired that the uniform be worn on all oc- 
casions. This uniform is pronounced by all experts who have ex- 
amined it as the cheapest, neatest, completest and best uniform 
prescribed by any institution in the South. 

Uniforms must be kept in good condition. The enforcement of 
all regulations with regard to the uniform is within the authority 
of the matrons of the several dormitories. Students may be re- 
quired to buy new garments whenever in the judgment of the Pres- 
ident and the matrons it is deemed necessary. 

Students must not sell or give cast off uniform garments to per- 
sons living in the vicinity of Athens. 

The uniform skirt, cap, and white waist should be worn by for- 
mer students when returning to the school in September. All stu- 
dents must wear the uniform as a traveling dress at all other 
times. 

It is very desirable that uniforms be ordered before leaving home. 
A detailed description and order blank will be furnished upon re- 
quest made to the Registrar. 

JUNIOR HIGH SCHOOL 

The work of this school includes the seventh, eighth, and ninth 
grades, or the last year of the elementary school and the first two 
years of the high school. Only a small amount of election is per- 
mitted. The work is of a high standard. Strong student teachers 
are used to a limited extent in this school. It is also used for ob- 
servation. 

First Year 

English 5 

History 5 

Mathematics 5 

Science ', 5 

Domestic Science or Shop 5 

Physical Education 2 

Second Year 

English 5 

History 5 

Mathematics 5 

Science 5 



20 



STATE NORMAL SCHOOL 



Domestic Science or Latin or Shop 5 

Physical Education 2 

Third Year 

English 5 

History 5 

Mathematics 5 

Science 5 

Domestic Science or Latin or Shop 5 

Physical Education 2 



COURSE OF STUDY 

Applicants for any of the Academic or Industrial classes may 
offer certificates from accredited high schools for entrance into these 
classes. These certificates will be accepted as evidence of prepara- 
tion in those subjects which are certified to and the holder will be 
allowed to take up any advanced work based upon the certified sub- 
jects. Work in one study cannot be accepted as the equivalent of 
work in a different subject. 

All students from non-accredited schools must pass entrance ex- 
aminations on all subjects required for admission into the class 
applied for. Non-graduates of four-year accredited high schools 
must present fifteen units and stand examinations in at least four 
subjects, including English and Mathematics. 



Freshman 

Education 1 _ _ — 

English 1 _____ _ . 

Mathematics 1 _ _ _ _ 

History 1 _____ _ 

Science ________ 

Latin 1 or Household 
2 and Manual Arts 1 



Hours 
_ _ 1 
_ _ 3 
_ _ 3 
_ _ 3 
_ _ 3 



Arts 



_ 3 

Physical Education _____ 2 



Total 



I 



Sophomore 

Hours 
Education 2______--l 

English 2 3 

Mathematics 2 and 3 

Latin 2 or Science 2 

Chemistry _________ 3 

or 
Biology 
Household Arts 7 and Manual 

Arts 2 and 3 3 

History _______---- 3 

Physical Education _____ 2 

Total 18 



The Freshman and Sophomore classes correspond to the third 
and fourth years of a four-year high school. The four classes for 
which the following courses are prescribed are strictly college 
classes. Advanced credit in these classes cannot be obtained by 
presenting high school certificates. 



STATE NORMAL SCHOOL 



21 



Junior 



Academic 

Hours 

Education 3 and 5 3, 

Education 4 _ — ____ 3» 

English 3 3 

Public School Music (1%), 

Manual Arts (1%) 3, 

Economics 1 (1%), Public 

Speaking 1(1%) 3. 

History 3 or Latin 3, 4; Math- 
ematics 4 or Physics; 

French 1 or Spanish 1 3> 

Physical Education _ _ _ 



_ 



Industrial 

Hours 

Education 3 and 5 3 

Education 4 3 

English 3 3 

Household Arts 3 and 18 3 
Household Arts 8 and 11 3 

Manual Arts 9 and 10 3 | 

or I 9 

Household Arts 11 and 18 3 | 
Manual Arts 4 and 5 _ 3 J 
Physical Education _____ 2 



Total 20 



Senior 



Academic 

Hours 
Education 7 and 8 _____ 3 
Practice Teaching and Con- 
ference ________ 3 

English 3 

Agriculture 1 (l 1 /.), Public 

School Music (1%) 3 

Sociology (l 1 /.) and Public 

Speaking (1%) 3 

History 4 or Latin 5 and 6, 
Mathematics 6 or Chemistry 
5, French 2 or Spanish 2 _ 3 
Physical Education _____ 2 



Total 20 

Junior 

A.B. 

Hours 
Education 17 and 18 _ _ _ _ 3 

English 5_________3, 

Nine hours to be selected from 

the following groups, not 

more than two subjects 

from each group: 

Group 1: Latin 7 and 8, 

French 3, Spanish 3 _ _ _ 3 
Group 2: Mathematics 7, 
Science 4_________ 3 

Group 3: History 5, Econo- 
mics 3, Education 3 

Group 4: Agriculture 4 and 



Total 20 



Industrial 



Hours 
Practice Teaching and Con- 
ference 3 

English _'- 3 

Agriculture 2, 3______3 

Household Arts 4, 5 and 

15 3 

Household Arts 16 and 

17 3 

Household Arts 9 and 

12 3J 

or 
Manual Arts 7 and 8 _ _ 3 ] 
Manual Arts 11 and 12 _ 3 \ 9 
Household Arts 16 and 17 3 J 
Physical Education _____ 2 

Total _20 

Degree 

B.S. 

Hours 

Education 17 and 18 3 

Household Chemistry _ _ _ _ 3 
Nine hours to be selected from 
the following groups, not 
more than two subjects 
from each group: 
Group 1: English 5, Latin 7 
and 8, French 3, Spanish 

3 3 

Group 2: Mathematics 7, 
Science __________ 3 

Group 3: History 5, Econom- 
ics, Education _ 3 



22 



STATE NORMAL SCHOOL 



5 ___3 

Group 5: Physical Education 
and Health, Public School 
Music, Public Speaking, 
Library Methods _ — 3 

Total 15 

Senior 

A.B. 

Hours 

Education 19 and 20 3. 

English 6 3 

Nine hours to be selected from ) 
the following groups, not 
more than two subjects 
from each group: 

Group 1: Latin 9 and 10, 
French 4, Spanish 4 _ _ _ _ 3 

Group 2: Mathematics 8, 
Science _________3 

Group 3: History 6, Econom- 
ics 4, Education 21 _ _ _ _ 3 

Group 4: Agriculture 6 and 
7, Household Arts 13 and 
14 3 

Group 5: Public School Music 2 



Group 4: Agriculture 4 and 
5, Household Arts 1, 6, 
Manual Arts 13 3 

Group 5: Public School Music, 
Physical Education and 
Health, Public Speaking, 
Library Methods _____ 3 

Total 15 

Degree 

B.S. 

Hours 

Education 19 and 20 _ 3. 

Bacteriology -------^ 

Nine hours to be selected from 
the following groups, not 
more than two subjects 
from each group: 

Group 1: English 6, Latin 9 
and 10, French 4, Spanish 
4 3 

Group 2: Mathematics 8, 
Science 7________3 

Group 3: History 6, Econom- 
ics 4, Education 21 _ _ _ _ 3 

Group 4: Agriculture 6 and 7, 
Household Arts 10 or 13, 
14, Manual Arts 14 3 

Group 5: Public School Music 3 



AGRICULTURE AND RURAL SOCIAL SCIENCE 



1. Agriculture. 

This is a course in general agriculture designed to meet the 
needs of teachers who expect to teach the subject in the public 
schools. The topics studied will be those in a text on general 
agriculture but in addition field trips will be made and laboratory 
work will be required, as well as suggestions given for the best 
methods to be used in teaching this subject. 

Three hours per week, one semester. Senior Academic. Credit: 
1% hours. 



\ 



2. Agronomy. 

This course will consist of the study of soils, the importance of 
the conservation of soils, the value of soil water as well as the 
means for the retention of this water. The value of manure and 
fertilizers, and a crop rotation as a factor in permanent agricul- 
ture will be stressed. A number of farm crops will be taken up in 
detail, with regard to varieties, means of improving and the insects 



STATE NORMAL SCHOOL 23 

and diseases of each crop will be studied. Laboratory work will 
be required. 

Three hours per week, one semester. Junior. Credit: 1 % hours. 

3. Animal Husbandry. 

The relation of farm animals to permanent agriculture, the prin- 
ciples involved in feeding, the importance of balanced rations to 
secure the proper developments of animals will be the foundation of 
this course. Later a detailed study will be made of the different 
breeds of cattle, swine, horses and poultry. One period per week 
will be devoted to laboratory work in the study of feeds, testing 
milk, working balanced rations and determining the profitableness 
of certain animals. 

Three hours per week, one semester. Junior. Credit: 1 y 2 hours. 

4. Poultry. 

The breeds of poultry, the care and management, the proper 
feeding and the insects and diseases of poultry will form the basis 
for this course. Consideration will be given to the location and 
construction of poultry houses. 

Three hours per *week, one semester. Junior Degree Course. 
Credit: \y% hours. 

5. Landscape Gardening. 

In this course a study will be made of the selection of flowers, 
shrubs and trees suitable for different types of homes and school 
buildings. The proper arrangement and grouping of the plants 
will be emphasized. Rural school grounds will be taken up in 
detail. 

Three hours per week, one semester. Junior Degree Course. 
Credit: 1^ hours. 

«>. Farm Management. 

This is a study of farm plans including size and location of 
buildings; fences, roads, different types of farming, labor, owner- 
ship or rental, market problems, co-operation, records and accounts. 

Three hours per week, one semester. Senior Degree Course. 
Credit: 1% hours. 

7. Agricultural Education. 

This is a course that deals with the method of teaching agricul- 
ture. Emphasis will be placed on the organization of the teaching 
material: how to teach various topics and how to use illustrative 
material, such as charts and slides. The organization of clubs and 
the home project method will bo discussed. } 



24 STATE NORMAL SCHOOL 

Three hours per week, one semester. Senior Degree Course. 
Credit: IY2 hours. 

8. Rural Economics. 

This course takes up some of the most salient features of the 
rural problems with emphasis on the rural conditions in Georgia 
and their effects on rural social life. County and community re- 
ports are made. 

Three hours per week, one semester. Junior. Credit: IY2 hours. 

9. Rural Sociology. 

This course is designed to give an interest and appreciation in 
rural life and rural life problems with emphasis on present ten- 
dencies and future growth in Georgia. The United States Census 
reports, and all available state house reports, are used in connec- 
tion with the text book. 

Three hours per week, one semester. Senior. Credit: iy 2 hours. 

10. Economics. 

This course involves a study of the present economic conditions 
of rural districts, and the necessity of improving these conditions 
as a basis of other rural improvement; the economic development 
of agriculture; the factors of agricultural production; rent and 
present-day rent problems; the farmer's income; rural co-opera- 
tion and credits; the marketing of farm products. 

Three hours per week throughout the year. Junior Degree 
Course. Credit: 3 hours. 

11. Sociology. 

This course takes up a study of the evolution of rural social con- 
ditions, the relation of physical environment to the several types of 
communities, economic and other causes which underlie changes in 
population, the present condition of rural communities, and existing 
rural social organizations, their functions, efficiency and present 
status. The influence of such factors as production, transportation, 
communication, land tenure, sanitation, and rural social, religious 
and educational organizations upon the general welfare of rural 
communities, the improvement of such influence, and the use of the 
survey to ascertain rural social needs are topics which receive care- 
ful consideration. 

Three hours per week throughout the year. Senior Degree 
Course. Credit: 3 hours. 



STATE NORMAL SCHOOL 25 

EDUCATION 



1. Pedagogy. 

A course presenting in simple and concrete form the psycho- 
logical basis of study, the typical methods of instruction, the daily 
problems of school life, and the art of teaching in its most practical 
form. 

One hour per week throughout the year. Freshman. 

2. Introduction to Teaching. 

This course will try to give the student a sympathetic under- 
standing of the problems. It will be practical but based on psy- 
chological principles. 

One hour per week throughout the year. Sophomore. 

3. Psychology. 

A course in Psychology from the point of view of educational 
theory and practice. A brief study is made of physiological psy- 
chology, followed by intensive work on the nature and function of 
the mental processes as revealed in human behavior. Through a 
study of perception, association, memory, imagination, reflective 
thinking, reasoning, judging, attention, interest, feeling, emotion, 
instinct, habit, will and character, the student gains a better un- 
derstanding of the problems involved in the training of children. 

Reading Course Required: Thorndike; James; Dewey; Tichener; 
Angell; Judd, Munsjterberg; Breese. 

Three hours per week, one semester. Junior. Credit: 1% hours. 

4. Principles of Teaching. 

The work in this class is intended to be both scientific and prac- 
tical. It is based on the laws of psychology and their use in the 
actual work of teaching. It makes use of modern scientific psy- 
chology and especially of recent investigations. The pupil is ex- 
pected to get practical control of principles by using them. He is 
expected to have his practices based on well understood reasons 
and to be able to modify his practices when occasion demands. 

References: Dewey, School and Society; James, Talks to Teach- 
ers on Psychology; Bolton's Principles of Education; Bagley, Edu- 
cational Values. 

Three hours per week for year. Junior. Credit: 3 hours. 

5. Child Psychology. 

Attention is given to the foundation of child study in other sci- 
ences, and to the more general, permanent, and practical truths 



26 STATE NORMAL SCHOOL 

thus far revealed by students of children, particularly regarding 
their physical nature, growth, development, abnormalities and de- 
fects with methods of remedy; tests and measurements, meaning 
of infancy; periods of childhood; suggestion, habit, moral develop- 
ment, influences affecting personality. 

References: Kirkpatrick's Fundamentals of Child Study; Rowe's 
Physical Nature of the Child; King's Psychology of Childhood; 
Sully's Studies of Childhood; Hall's Adolescence; Tyler's Growth 
and Education. 

Three hours per week, one semester. Junior. Credit: 1% hours. 

6. History of Education. 

A study of the educational ideals, practices and tendencies of the 
past, the great educational reformers, and the principles derived 
from them, the origin and development of modern educational 
theory and practice. The course embraces a study of oriental, 
classical, mediaeval, and renaissance education, present tendencies 
in education, modern school systems, and the American public 
school. Reading course required. 

References: Parker's History of Modern Elementary Education, 
Hoyt's Studies in the History of Modern Education; Graves' Great 
Educators of Three Centuries. 

Three hours per week, one semester. Senior. Credit: 1 x k. 
hours. 

"". School Management and Supervision. 

This course undertakes to prepare the student to understand the 
various problems which will arise in connection with the school 
other than instruction. It deals with routine, daily program, at- 
tendance, hygiene conditions, discipline, incentives, coercives, records 
and gracing and the teacher's relations to school officers and the 
community. 

References: Dutton, School Management; Foght, The American 
Rural School; Sears, Classroom Organization and Control. 

Three hours per week, one semester. Senior. Credit: 1 x fo, 
hours. 

fl. Practice Teaching. 

The members of the Senior class are required to do practice 
leaching throughout the year in the various grades of the Train- 
ing School and to co-operate in the work of the Rural School under 
the supervision and guidance of the head of the Department of 
Pedagogy and the Principal of the Training School, with the sympa- 
thetic and constructive criticism of skilled critic teachers. Before 



STATE NORMA!, SCHOOL 27 

teaching, detailed lesson plans are prepared and submitted for 
criticism. 

Two hours per week throughout the year. Senior. Credit: 2 
hours. 

9. Common School Review. 

Provision will be made to give a rapid review of the common 
school branches to those who need the review. 

10. Conferences. 

The officers of the Department of Pedagogy, the officers and 
teachers of the Training School, and all the members of the Senior 
class meet once a week for conference and discussion of the work 
of the Training Schools and vital educational problems in general. 

One hour per week throughout the year. Senior. Credit: 1 hour. 

11. Term Paper. 

Original investigation of some important phase of education, with 
a written report thereon, is required of members of the Senior I 
class. ' 

12. School Law. 

A course of lectures on the salient provisions of the laws relating 
to the common school system of the state. 
Special periods. Junior, Senior. 

13. Reading Course and Current Educational Literature. 

In addition to the regular course of study in this department, 
courses of reading are offered, based upon professional material at 
hand in the pedagogical department of the Carnegie Library of the 
State Normal School. A score or more of current educational peri- 
odicals coming to the Library form the basis of class conferences 
throughout the Junior and Senior years. 

Special periods. Junior, Senior. 

14. Principles of Secondary Education. 

This course is designed to give an intensive study of the mod- 
ern problems in secondary education. It will include a study of 
the ultimate and proximate aims of high school education, selection 
and presentation of subject matter, plans for the economic use of 
the student's time, and classroom management. It will involve the 
psychology of high school subjects, type lessons, solution of prob- 
lems and practical work. 

Three hours per week, one semester. Senior Degree Course. 
Credit: 1 V 2 hours. 

15. General Methods of Teaching In High Schools. 

The course deals with the problems of classroom teaching. It is 



28 STATE NORMAL SCHOOL 

a general methods course for prospective high school teachers and 
supervisors. The following problems are treated: selection and 
arrangement of subject matter, economy in classroom management' 
teaching various subjects, individual differences, supervised study, 
the use of books, laboratory methods, questioning, measuring the 
results of teaching. Reading and practical work required. 

Three hours per week, one semester. Senior Degree Course. 
Credit: 1Y 2 hours. 

16. Educational Psychology. 

This course is designed to acquaint the student with the more 
important laws and principles of psychology as they apply to the 
educative process, and to give a survey of the experimental find- 
ings in the learning process. Among the topics considered will be: 
native tendencies, habit formation, memory and association, laws 
of learning, individual differences, transfer of training, interfer- 
ence, fatigue and the mentally defective and the gifted children. 

Three hours per week, one semester. Junior Degree Course. 
Credit: iy 2 hours. 

17. Testing and Measurements. 

This course is planned to give a working knowledge of the more 
important standard tests for measuring the ability and achieve- 
ment of elementary and high school children. Practice in admin- 
istering tests and interpreting results will be an important part of 
this course. Special consideration will be given to the use of stand- 
ard tests in diagnosing, classifying and evaluating the progress of 
children in various school subjects. Intelligence tests, readings, 
laboratory work. 

Three hours per week, one semester. Junior Degree Course. 
Credit: l x / 2 hours. 

IS. Primary Methods and Supervision. 

This course is designed to benefit teachers of special classes, 
supervisors and principals. It includes (1) the theory and practice 
of teaching beginners; (2) an analysis and demonstration of the 
principal methods; (3) a resume of recent scientific investigation; 

(4) a sketch of the historical development of primary methods; 

(5) the specific qualities essential to success in this type of work. 
Three hours per week, one semester. Junior Degree Course. 

Credit: 1V 2 hours. 

19. Public School Curriculum. 

An intensive study is made of the curriculum of the Elementary 
and Junior High Schools as they are related to social conditions and 



STATE NORMAL SCHOOL 29 

•needs. This study includes: the historical development of the 
course of study; basic principles for the selection, grading, and 
organization of public school subjects; a comparative study of 
curriculums from different sections of the United States. Special 
emphasis is placed upon designing pupil activities to meet voca- 
tional, social, and civic needs. Practical work required. 

Three peirods per week, one semester. Junior Degree Course. 
Credit: 1% hours. 

20. City, State and County School Administration. 

This is a study of the principles underlying an efficient state 
school system, both city and county, with special reference to the 
present and future needs of Georgia. Topics studied will include: 
educational surveys; the federal government in public education; 
school funds; school budgets; selection, preparation, certification 
and improvement of teachers; school libraries; buildings and equip- 
ment; consolidation; compulsory attendance; free supplies; retarda- 
tion; economy and efficiency. Field work and practical work re- 
quired. 

Three hours per week, one semester. Senior Degree Course. 
Credit: 1V 2 hours. 

21. School Supervision. 

The purpose of this course is the preparation of supervisors and 
supervising principles. This course considers the problems of the 
superintendents and principles in relation to attendance, organiza- 
tion, classification, marking systems, promotion plans, acceleration, 
retardation, elimination of pupils, records and reports. It will con- 
sider the function of the supervisor, methods of supervision and 
effective devices used by supervisors. Criticism and improvement 
of instruction and standards for judging instruction. Practical 
work. 

Three hours per week, one semester. Senior Degree Coursr 
Credit: 1% hours. 

ELEMENTARY TRAINING SCHOOL 



The Training School is amply equipped with a library, a shop, a 
gymnasium, a kitchen, and a dining room, and the different class 
rooms are well equipped with modern appliances. 

The school is a well organized one of nine grades and the course 
of study is planned to meet present needs in the life of the child 
and to suit the interests of the various periods of child develop- 



30 STATE NORMAL SCHOOL 

ment. The work, so far as practicable, is based upon present day 
industries, and especially the industries which are taught in the 
school: Cooking, Gardening, Sewing and Manual Training. In ad- 
dition to the industries named, the course of study includes Read- 
ing, Writing, Spelling, Drawing, Painting, Language and Grammar, 
Literature, Elementary Science, Geography, Arithmetic, Algebra, 
History, Music, and Physical Training. 

Before any student is permitted to do practice teaching in the 
Training School, the equivalent of academic and professional work 
as given in the Junior class of the State Normal School must be 
satisfactorily completed. 

THE RURAL SCHOOL 



It is our purpose with the model building and modern equipment 
to help in adjusting the rural school to the agricultural and domes- 
tic life of the country; to demonstrate ways in which a rural school 
may be the social center of community life; to adjust the course of 
study to rural conditions and interests; to study the problem of con- 
solidation of schools, to show what may be done by one teacher in 
carrying out a practical course of study; to bring the student-teach- 
ers of the State Normal School in close contact with the actual 
problems of the country school. A schedule is arranged by which 
they may observe the daily work of the school and have practical 
experience in teaching in a country school. 

JUNIOR HIGH SCHOOL 



The Junior High School is organized along the most approved 
lines and includes the seventh, eighth and ninth grades. It is 
designed to give the full equivalent of the first two years of high 
school. It is used for observation, demonstration and teaching 
under supervision. 

ENGLISH 



1. Rhetoric and English Literature. 

A study of the principles of rhetoric and composition with fre- 
quent exercises in theme writing, and a careful study of the follow- 
ing classics: Scott's, The Lay of the Last Minstrel; Dickens's, A Tale 
of Two Cities; Shakespeare's, The Merchant of Venice; Tennyson's, 
The Idyls of the King; and Lamb's, Essays of Elia. 

Three hours per week throughout the year. Freshman. 



STATE NORMAL SCHOOL 31 

2L Literature and Theme- Writing. 

A study of the history of English literature, accompanied by a 
critical study of the masterpieces of some of the leading authors; 
theme-writing will be studied and practiced, the themes being 
based upon the studies in literature. 

Three hours per week throughout the year. Sophomore. 

3. Shakespeare. 

<*^A careful study of Shakespeare's plays with attention to forma- 
tion of plot, character delineation, setting, and interpretation of 
thought. Frequent themes will be written and criticised in class. 

Three hours per week throughout the year. Junior. Credit: 
3 hours. 

4.J51ements and Kinds of Literature. 

^The entire year is given to a study of poetry, a book of se- 
lections from the works of the English poets being used as models. 
This study consists of an analysis of poetry, its elements, scansion, 
and varieties of forms. Occasional exercises in verse writing are 
used for fixing the poetic forms in mind. 

Three hours per week throughout the year. Senior. Credit: 
3 hours. 

5. The English Novel. 

In this course a study is made of the development of the novel 
from the earlier romances and the eighteenth century essay. Rep- 
resentative novels of Richardson, Fielding, Smollet, Austen, Scott, 
Dickens, Thackeray, George Eliot, Stephenson, Reade, Hardy, Kip- 
ling, Cooper, Hawthorne, and Howells, will be read outside of class 
and written reports made to the class from time to time. 

Three hours per week throughout the year. Junior Degree 
Course. Credit: 3 hours. 

6. The Development of the I Mama. 

This course includes a study of the History of the Drama: The 
Greek, Drama, Latin Drama, French Drama, English Drama; Dra- 
matic Construction; Study of Masterpieces; Antigone; Everyman; 
Marlowe's plays; Ben Johnson's plays; The Rivals; The School for 
Scandal; She Stoops to Conquer; Modern Drama of the English 
School, the French School, the German School, the Irish School, 
the Scandinavian School, tlie American School. 

Three hours per week throughout the year. Senior Degree 
Course. Credit: 3 hours. 



32 STATE NORMAL SCHOOL 

HISTORY 



1. Medieval History. 

This course includes the study of the religious institutions of the 
Middle Ages, emergence and development of European states; the 
Crusades; effect of Oriental culture on Europe; rise of towns; trade 
and the common people; transition from Medieval to Modern ideals. 

Three hours per week throughout the year. Freshman. 

2. Modern European History. 

In this course the following topics will be studied; political uni- 
fication of European nations; changes in labor, manufactures and 
transportation; capitalism and the factory system; political and 
social reforms; nationalism, imperialism, international relations; 
the outbreak of the World War. 

Three hours per week throughout the year. Sophomore. 

3. Advanced Course in American Government. 

This course includes a study of: principles and functions of Gov- 
ernment; administrative organization in the United States; compari- 
son of Federal, State, and local forms; forms of citizenship and sov- 
ereignty in leading European states and America; methods of pop- 
ular control and expression of public opinion; parties; nature and 
scope of financial and budgetary method; regulation of commercial 
and labor interests; problems of Government reforms. 

Three hours per week throughout the year. Junior. Credit: 3 
hours. 

4. Contemporary American History. 

This course is based on a review of the nineteenth century of 
United States history; forming of the Federal Government; parties; 
the Westward movement; sectionalism; slavery; the Civil War; 
reconstruction; contemporary history and industrial era; growth 
of trusts and labor organizations; United States as a world power; 
international relations; banking, currency, and credit; the charac- 
teristic features of Americanism. 

Three hours per week throughout the year. Senior. Credit: 3 
hours. 

5. World Politics. 

This course will embrace a study of the causes and conduct of 
leadership in the great war; military and diplomatic causes; co- 
lonial conflicts in Africa; racial and political conflicts in the Bal- 
kans; balance of power, concert of Europe; German egemony and 



STATE NORMAL SCHOOL 33 

pan-German ideals; outbreak of war; modern methods of waifare; 
military movements on all fronts; origin and history of peace move- 
ments; past Peace conferences, aims and results; peace negotia- 
tions; Paris-Versailles conference; claims; attempted political and 
economic settlements; treaties; League of Nations; disarmament 
confrenece; international relations. The course purposes to train 
the students in the proper interpretation of acts and events of our 
own times, to discover and understand history in daily newspapers 
and periodicals, and to form logical and clear conclusions. 

Three hours per week throughout the year. Junior Degree 
Course. Credit: 3 horus. 

6. Problems of Government. 

This course is applied workings of American government and 
citizenship, and includes development of co-operation; growth and 
application of ideals of liberty and law; principles of business and 
industry; city and country life; problems of union; international 
relations; America and other nations; government control of health 
and disease; labor and industry; water and food supply; charity, 
crime and correction; education. 

Three hours per week throughout the year. Senior Degree 
Course. Credit: 3 hours. 

HOUSEHOLD ARTS 



Fees. 

A fee sufficient to cover the necessary expenses is charged in 
classes where laboratory work is done. These fees are due and 
payable in advance — at the beginning of each semester. 

Cooking Uniforms. 

Every girl taking cooking is required to have at least two all 
white cooking aprons, two hand towels three-fourths of a yard long, 
and two navy blue or white denim pot holders six inches square. 
The aprons must be made according to Pictorial Review Pattern 
No. 3786. The material should be firm, of good weight — cotton 
sheeting, "Fruit of the Loom," "Cabot Cotton," Normandy linen or 
Indian Head are suggested. The apron should be made even with 
the skirt of the wearer. These articles should be made and brought 
from home ready for use at the beginning of the term. 

1. Applied Dress Design. 

This course includes a detailed study of fabrics; a survey of the 
individual and social conditions which have Influenced the design of 



34 STATE NORMAL SCHOOL 

costume in different centuries; a study of the fundamental princi- 
ples of design; and exercises involving the use of these principles in 
costume. 

Prerequisites: Household Arts 10 and 11. 

Three hours per week, one semester. Junior Degree Course. 
Credit: iy 2 hours. 

2. Clothing. 

This course gives a general knowledge of garment making. The 
various stitches and processes ordinarily used in sewing are taught 
in the making of simple articles. Hygiene and economics of cloth- 
ing are studied in elementary form. 

Three hours per week, one semester. Freshman. 

3. Clothing. 

This course includes the fundamental processes of elementary 
sewing. Emphasis is placed on selection of materials with relation 
to design, utility, durability, and cost, and the care and repair of 
clothing. Simple garments are made for which both drafter and 
commercial patterns are used. Good technique and high standards 
of workmanship are stressed. 

Three hours per week, one semester. Junior. Credit: IY2 hours. 

4. Clothing. 

This course is planned for those who have had instruction in 
elementary sewing. The aims are to give the student a broader 
understanding of the scope and content of the subject matter in 
clothing by including problems which embrace the fundemental 
principles involved in the section and design of clothing, the theory 
and use of color, pattern making, and clothing construction. Pro- 
fessional work is included. 

Prerequisites: Household Arts 1 and 2. 

Three hours per week, one semester. Senior. Credit: IY2 hours. 

5. Millinery. 

A course planned to meet the needs of students who are prepar- 
ing to teach. It provides instruction in the designing, selection, 
making and trimming, care, and remodeling of hats. Suggestions 
for teaching millinery are included. 

Two hours per week, one semester. Senior. Credit: 1 hour. 

6. Clotliing. 

This course gives advanced practice in dressmaking, without the 
use of patterns. The practical work will be developed largely in 



STATE NORMAL SCHOOL 35 

muslin and tissue paper. The final problem of the course will be 
an afternoon dress. 

Prerequisites: Household Arts 11 and 13. 

Three hours per week, one semester. Junior Degree Course. 
Credit: 1V 2 hours. 

7. Cookery. 

An elementary course in cookery designed to gire a working 
knowledge of household processes connected with food. Attention 
is given throughout to sanitation, right habits of working, and to 
the care and management of kitchen furnishings. 

Three hours per week, one semester. Sophomore. 

8. Cookery. 

A laboratory course in which food preparation is co-ordinated 
with and based upon a study of the composition and nutritive value 
of foods. It is planned to give a thorough understanding of the 
principles underlying the preparation of different types of food, 
and also, to secure a fair degree of skill in manipulation of ma- 
terials and utensils. Emphasis is placed on neatness and orderli- 
ness and economy in use of materials. Simple home meals are 
planned and served, and the cost of food in relation to the income 
of the home and of the school is studied. 

Three hours per week, one semester. Junior. Credit: 1V 2 hours. 

9. Cookery. 

This course provides opportunity for review of the principles of 
cookery, substitution and variation of recipes, economical use of 
leftovers and adaptation of receipts to school work. Practical prob- 
lems are provided for the planning, purchasing, preparation and 
serving of food for groups under pressure of economy of time, 
money and effort. Class discussions are held on sequence of les- 
sons, management and cost of lessons for public school classes. 

Prerequisites: Household Arts 2 and 3. 

Three hours per week, one semester. Senior. Credit: 1 V 2 hours. 

10. Cookery. 

This course consists of an experimental study of special prob- 
lems in food preparation. It includes the study of cookery appa- 
ratus, the uses of different food materials; a qualitative and quan- 
titative study of recipes, of the chemical and physical changes pro- 
duced by heat and in the combination of materials. 

Prerequisites: Household Arts 5 and 6. 



36 STATE NORMAL SCHOOL 

Three hours per week, throughout the year. Senior Degree 
Course. Credit: 3 hours. 

11. Foods. 

This course begins with the classification of foods based on their 
chemical composition and a detailed study of the important foods 
under each class. Special emphasis is placed on the nutritive value 
of each food, its place in the diet and its economical value. 

Three hours per week, one semester. Junior. Credit: 1V 2 hours. 

12. Home Management. 

This course is designed to give the students actual practical ex- 
perience and skill in the organization and management of the home, 
to test the ability of the student, and to set social relations and 
standards. It consists of class discussions and related practical 
work in the Practice House. The problems of the Practice House 
are used as a basis for the class discussion. The Practice House is 
owned by the Institution and is in charge of an instructor of House- 
hold Arts. The house maintains itself, and keeps up its own equip- 
ment. Every senior, majoring in Household Arts, is required to 
live in the house at least thirty days. 

Required of all Seniors majoring in Household Arts. 

Three hours per week, one semester. Senior. Credit: 1 V2 hours. 

13. Home Nursing and Child Care. 

This course deals with the prevention and care of illness in the 
home and the health problems of the mother and child. It includes 
such topics as the proper surroundings for the sick, prevention and 
care of common ailments, food for the sick, first aid treatment for 
common emergencies, the physical care of the infant, the nursery, 
clothing and food for the infant and small children. 
/ Three hours per week, one semester. Senior Degree Course. 
Credit: 1V 2 hours. 

14. Hygiene. 

This course will consider the principles of personal and general 
hygiene and their application to every day life. 

Open only to degree students. 

Three hours per week, one semester. Senior Degree Course. 
Credit: 1% hours. 

15. Methods of Household Arts. 

A professional course, consisting of lectures and class discussions 
designed to meet the needs of students majoring in Household Art. 
A study is made of the history, organization and promotion of 
Household Arts and its articulation of subject matter, courses of 



STATE NORMAL SCHOOL 37 

study for special types of schools and equipment of laboratories 
are given. Special methods in class organization and management 
are discussed, and reference books, bulletins, and pamphlets are 
reviewed. 

One hour per week, one semester. Senior. Credit: V 2 hour. 

16. Nutrition. 

Lectures, discussions, and laboratory work. This course presents 
the fundamental principles of human nutrition and their applica- 
tion to the feeding of individuals, and families under varying phys- 
iological and economic conditions. A study of the proper diet for 
infants and young children, and of the school lunch, is included. 
The selection of subject matter, the adaptation of material and 
methods of presentation for high school pupils are discussed. 

Prerequisites: Household Arts 3 and 4. 

Three hours per week, one semester. Senior. Credit: iy 2 hours. 

17. Physiology. 

This course consists of a study of the construction of the human 
body, its ordinary behavior, operations or workings, and its proper 
management, protection and care. Emphasis is placed upon per- 
sonal and public hygiene and individual and general health. Sim- 
ple lessons in home nursing are included. 

Three hours per week, one semester. Senior. Credit: 1 y 2 hours. 

18. Textiles. 

This course comprises the history and development of textiles, 
the study of fibers, and the identification of fabrics, with emphasis 
on those points which affect the appearance, wearing quality, prices, 
and uses of materials. Suggestions are made for the correlation of 
the subject matter with other clothing subjects. 

Three hours per week, one semester. Junior. Credit: 1V 2 hours. 

LATIN 



1. Cicoro. 

Four of Cicero's Orations will be read with special attention to 
their historical setting. The course will also include understanding 
Latin in the Latin order; careful study of vocabulary; the writing 
of a biographical sketch of Cicero. 

Three hours per week throughout the year. Freshman. 

2. Virgil's Acnicd. 

Books I, II, and VI will be included in this course. Attention is 



38 STATE NORMAL SCHOOL 

given to Virgil's figures of speech; the declension of Greek nouns; 
review of forms and laws of syntax; the study of important myths. 
Three hours per week throughout the year. Sophomore. 

3. Selections from Horace. 

Papers are required on the Augustan Period. Construction and 
literary values are dwelt on. 

Three hours per week throughout the first semester. Junior 
Credit: 1 % hours. 

4: Livy. 

This course involves a study of Livy's style; sight reading; em- 
phasis on translation into choice English. 

Three hours per week throughout the second semester. Junior. 
Credit: 1% hours. 

5. Cornelius Xepos. 

In this course quick reading is encouraged, covering as much 
ground as possible. Sight reading is stressed. 

Three hours per week throughout the first semester. Senior. 
Credit: 1% hours. 

6. Ovid. 

In this course special attention is given to the story of the crea- 
tion. Important myths are studied. Stress is laid on sight reading. 

Three hours per week throughout the second semester. Senior. 
Credit: 1% hours. 

7. Sallust. 

The books studied in this course will be Jugurtha and Cataline. 
Attention will be given the literary quality and the history of the 
literature. Sight translation will be included. 

Three hours per week throughout the first semester. Junior 
Degree Course. Credit: 1 Mj hours. 

8. Tacitus. 

Attention will be given to the study of the Classical Period, the 
language, history, philosophy and law of the Romans. 

Three hours per week throughout the second semester. Junior 
Degree Course. Credit: 1% hours. 

9. Juvenal. 

Satires. Careful and accurate translations are stressed. A paper 
is required. 

Three hours per week throughout the first semester. Senior 
Degree Course. Credit: 1V 2 hours. 



STATE NORMAL SCHOOL 39 



10. Lucretius. 



De Rerum Natura. Emphasis is placed on accuracy of transla- 
tion. 

Three periods per week throughout the second semester. Senior 
Degree Course. Credit: 1 % hours. 

LIBRARY METHODS 



This course will include a study of the classification and cata- 
logue of the Normal School Library, the uses of encyclopedias, in- 
dexes to periodical literature and general reference books during 
the fall term. The spring term will include the organization of a 
school library, simple methods of accessioning, classifying and cat- 
aloguing, selection and buying of books. 

Three hours per week throughout the year. Degree Course. 
Credit: 3 hours. 

MANUAL ARTS 



1. Freshman Drawing. 

This course consists of drawing from objects and includes the 
first principles of composition. 

Three periods per week, one semester. Freshman. 

2. Basketry. 

In this course use is made of native material such as wire grass, 
pine needles, etc., in the making of at least two baskets. Raffia 
and rattan baskets are also taught. 

Three hours per week during one-half of first semester. Sopho- 
more. 

.'*. Paper and Cardboard Construction. 

The purpose of this course is to give students a knowledge of the 
various forms of this suitable for primary grades. The course in- 
cludes paper folding, cutting, and booklet making. 

Three hours per week during one-half of the first semester. 

Credit of one and a half hours is given for the combined 
courses of Basketry and Paper and Cardboard Construction. Fee, 
$2.00 for the combined courses. 

4. Bookbinding* 

This course gives the processes of case binding and library bind- 
ing. A study of the history of printing and bookmaking is in- 



40 STATE NORMAL SCHOOL 

eluded. Problems In design will be one feature of this course. 
Three hours per week throughout the first semester. Juniors. 
For credits, see the next subject. Fee, $2.00. 

5. Woodwork and Mechanical Drawing. 

These are interdependent courses. Simple projects in shop work 
are introduced through the making of working drawings for the 
same. Good lettering is stressed. 

Three hours throughout the second semester. Juniors. 

College credit of three hours is given for the combined course of 
Bookbinding and Woodwork and Mechanical Drawing. Fee, $2.00. 

6. Blackboard Dlustration. 

This course includes the study of characteristic features of 
various countries in landscape sketches; panels for calendars; black- 
board borders; holiday decorations; letters; birds; boats; log cab- 
ins; trees. Mediums used are soft white chalk, charcoal, and col- 
ored chalks. 

Three hours a week during one semester. Juniors. Credit: lVz 
hours. Fee, 50c. 

7. Advanced Woodwork. 

The problems of this course are suitable for Junior High Schools, 
and involve the designing and constructing of useful articles for the 
home and for personal use. Wood finishes will be considered. The 
students of this course may teach woodwork to fifth and sixth grade 
boys as part of their professional training. 

Three hours a week during one semester. Seniors. Credit: 1V 2 
hours. Fee, $2.00. 

8. Pottery. 

This is a practical course in work with clay; beginning with the 
"coiled" method of the American Indian and ending with the com- 
mercial method of today. 

Three hours a week during one semester. Seniors. Credit: 1V> 
hours. Fee, $2.00. 

9. Drawing. 

In this course a study is made of: (1) Nature study: flowers, 
berries, etc., painted with water colors; decorative uses of plants; 
panels of flowers in temperine; (2) Perspective: practice in draw- 
ing groups of geometric solids; (3) Cast drawings: drawing from 
plaster Paris models; study of shapes size, value, and edges or" 
planes; (4) Still life: grouped objects in pencil, pen and ink, water 



STATE NORMAL SCHOOL 41 

color, temperine; (5) Color: various types of color schemes; color 
schemes applied. 

Three hours a week during one semester. Juniors. Credit: 1 V2 
hours. Fee, $2.00. 

10. House Furnishing. 

The study of the principles of the art of furnishing the home. 
Color and color schemes. Period furniture. Styles of domestic 
architecture. 

One and a half hours a week throughout the year. Juniors. 
Credit: 1V 2 hours. Fee, '$2.00. 

11. Drawing III. 

This course embraces a study of: (1) Figure drawing, with 
proportion of the human figure; cast drawing; pose drawing; (2) 
Nature study: trees; outdoor sketches; landscape composition; 
(3) Perspective: interiors; exteriors; (4) Still life: advanced draw- 
ing of groups of objects; (5) Color. 

One and a half hours a week throughout the year. Seniors. 
Credit: 1 V 2 hours. Fee, $2.00. 

12. Design I. 

This course consists of: principles of design; tile; units; borders, 
surface patterns; blotter; panels and corners; lamp shade; book 
rack ends bowl; block prints; historic ornament. 

One and a half hours a week throughout the year. Seniors. 
Credit: 1 V 2 hours. Fee, $2.00. 

13. Drawing III. and Art History. 

This course includes art history through lectures and required 
readings, also practical work in drawing and color, stressing com- 
position and artistic arrangement. Junior De^-ee. 

Three hours a week throughout the year. Credit: 1 V 2 hours. 
Fee, $2.00. 

14. Drawing IV. and Art Appreciation. 

This course consists of advanced work in art history and ad- 
vanced work in drawing and painting. 

Three hours a week throughout the year. Senior Degree. Credit: 
3 hours. Fee, $2.00. ^ J , " " 

MATHEMATICS 



1. Plane Geometry. 

This course includes a study of elementary notions; angles; tri- 
angles; quadrilaterals; constructions; properties of circles; pro- 



42 STATE NORMAL SCHOOL 

portion with practical applications; properties, etc., of the regular 
polygon; construction. Reviews and original exercises will be con- 
ducted throughout the course. 

Three hours per week throughout the year. Freshman. 

2. Solid Geometry. 

This course includes a study of the application of plane geometry 
and arithmetic in measurement and construction of the various 
kinds of plane figures; form in the construction and measurement 
of solids; deducing and applying formulas for the measurement of 
the surface and volumes of prisms, cylinders, pyramids, cones, 
frustrums, etc.; the geometry of the sphere. Original propositions 
and exercises will be stressed. 

Three hours per week, one semester. Sophomore. 

3. Advanced Algebra. 

This course will include applications in solving geometric exer- 
cises. Special study will also be given to such topics as are not 
fully treated in an elementary course: (1) Radical quantities; (2) 
Negative, fractional and zero exponents; (3) Simultaneous quad- 
ratic equations; (4) Graphical representation; (5) Determinants; 
(6) Arithmetical and geometrical progressions; (7) Logarithms; 
(8) Reviews. 

Three hours per week, one semester. Sophomore. 

4. Plane and Spherical Trigonometry. 

This subject will deal with Trigonometric functions of an acute 
angle and use of natural functions and logarithms in the solution 
of the right triangle; functions of any angle and the sum differ- 
ence of two angles ;^he oblique triangle; applications in exercises 
and problems some'f which are to be formulated from original 
data gathered by the student himself. 

Three hours per week throughout the year. Junior. Credit: 3 
hours. 

5. College Algebra. 

This course will embrace quadratic, irrational, and higher equa- 
tions; ratio, proportion, and variation; the progressions; the bi- 
nominal theorem; permutations and combinations; limits; infinite 
series; exponential and logarithmic series; determinants; and the- 
ory of equations. 

Three hours per week throughout the year. Junior Degree 
Course. Credit: 3 hours. 



STATE NORMAL SCHOOL 43 

6. Elementary Analysis. 

This course consists of one semester's work in elementary ana- 
lytic geometry and one in elementary calculus. 

The analytic geometry involves co-ordinate systems; the curve 
and equation; the straight line and circle; curve plotting; functions 
and graphs, etc. 

The calculus involves differentiation and formulas for differen- 
tiation; slope tangent and normal; maxima and minima; rates; 
differentials; and a brief study of integration. 

Three hours per week throughout the year. Senior. Credit: 3 
hours. 

7. Advanced Analytic Geometry. 

In addition to topics embraced in 6, this course will include polar 
co-ordinates; the transformation of co-ordinates; the properties of 
the parabola; ellipse, hyperbola; tangents and normals; and the 
analytic geometry of space. 

Three hours per week throughout the year. Junior Degree 
Course. Credit: 3 hours. 

8. Differential and Integral Calculus. 

In this course a careful study will be made of differentiation; 
limits; analytic and geometric applications; curvature; application 
of the derivative in mechanics; curve tracing in Cartesian and polar 
co-ordinates. 

The work in the integral calculus will embrace the indefinite in- 
tegral; the definite integral; formulas for integration; rational and 
irrational fractions; binominal differentials; trigonometric and defi- 
nite integrals; geometric applications; differental equatons; me- 
chanical applications. 

Three hours per week throughout the year. Senior Degree 
Course. Credit: 3 hours. • 

MUSIC 



1. Public School Music. 

The teaching of sight reading and the* fundamentals of the theory 
involved is the aim of the work of this year. The first part of the 
year's work is devoted to correct singing tone and the reading of 
simple one part melodies. Later, two part and three part music 
is taken. A frequent division of a large class is made on the basis 
of the rapidity with which the students read. This affords the in- 
centive of competititive work and makes it possible for the more 
musically inclined to advance according to ability and effort. Dur- 



44 STATE NORMAL SCHOOL 

ing both Junior and Senior years all are encouraged to collect ma- 
terial of current musical events. Occasional four minute talks and 
illustrations on subjects relative to increasing appreciation and un- 
derstanding of the best music and composers varies the usual and 
the more technical character of the class work. 

Three hours per week, one semester. Junior. Credit: iy 2 hours. 

2. Public School Music. 

Application of correct! teaching methods of music to children is 
the main purpose of this year's work. A general consideration of 
problems in music encountered by the ordinary grade teacher is 
made with a view of a complete survey of the attainments in a 
course of study expected for each grade as a standard of accom- 
plishment. The child voice and help for the vocally deficient is 
studied and song material acquired. Work in more advanced sight 
reading is continued. The privilege of electing music for a prac- 
tise teaching subject and observation of lessons taught in the 
Elementary Practice School is a great aid in this year's work. 

Three hours per week, one semester. Senior. Credit: 1V 2 hours. 

3. Public School Music. 

Advanced sight reading; methods for primary and intermediate 
grades including the explicit problems of each grade, song material 
and appreciation of listening lessons. A course of study by the 
year, months and weeks with material used is made for each grade. 
Organization and conducting of school bands and orchestras is also 
given. 

Three hours per week throughout the year. Junior Degree 
Course. Credit: 3 hours. 

4. Public School Mujsic. 

Advanced sight reading and fundamentals of harmony. Methods 
for the upper grammar grades and high school with the accompany- 
ing detailed course of study and explicit material to be used in each 
grade is studied. Type demonstration lessons suitable for the use 
of supervisors in instruction of grade teachers are also planned. 
Principles involved in choral work and their direction are applied 
practically in the Senior chorus organization as described elsewhere. 
The disposition of changing boys' and girls' voices and other char- 
acteristics of adolescence as bearing on the music course of those 
grades is a matter of particular importance and receives the study 
due it as such. 

Three hours per week throughout the year. Senior Degree 
Course. Credit: 3 hours. 



STATE NORMAL SCHOOL 45 



5. Senior Chorus. 



The entire Senior class is organized for chorus at which practical 
application is made of methods for conducting community singing 
or grade and high school chorus songs. The chorus affords an ex- 
cellent opportunity for those studying public school music with an 
idea of specialization to have a laboratory for experiment and 
practice in choral work. This is found of invaluable aid as the 
teachers of today are expected to take active community interests 
outside the school or in it as community center. One formal con- 
cert is given annually by the chorus which includes selections from 
the best classics. 



Piano. 

Realizing the demands for better equipped Instrumental Music 
Teachers, the State Normal School has added Special Normal 
Course, the object of which is to fit the student (at very little cost) 
to teach Instrumental Music. 

Students are not only required to be acquainted with the repre- 
sentative works of the best composers, but must study the theory of 
music, harmony, history and pedagogy, and be able to analyze 
and criticise a musical composition intelligently. 

The standard has been raised, the course carefully planned, and 
the department is well qualified to carry on the work. The advan- 
tages are equal to any music school in the south. 

Students are graded and classified according to their technical 
skill, and their general musical knowledge. They are required to 
bring with them a complete list of studies and pieces, that they 
may be given credit for same. 

Especial attention is given to ensemble playing. The year is 
divided into four terms, nine weeks each. Tuition payable in ad- 
vance at time dormitory fee is due. Piano practice included. Tui- 
tion when once paid will not be refunded. 

Piano, two hours each week, $12.75 per term. 

Harmony, two hours each week, $9.00* per term. 

Voice. 

This course is divided into four terms of nine weeks each. A 
small fee of $12.75 per term is charged. This includes use of piano 
for practice. This takes up the proper placing of the voice, breath 
control, relaxation, phrasing, and song interpretation. Songs of 
the best known composers and study of arias of well known operas 
will be studied. 



4 6 STATE NORMAL SCHOOL 

Violin. 

Instruction in violin consists of a graded courset embracing ele- 
mentary exercises and studies by Hohmann, Wolfbart, and others, 
progressing through Kayser, Books I and II, Mazas, Kreutzer, 
Schradieck Scale Studies Rode, Fiorillo Gavinies and others, with 
pieces by classic and modern composers, according to the profi- 
ciency of pupil. A candidate for di^lloma in violin must have 
studied Kreutzer and Rode, and some of the easier concertos and 
sonatos, have a reasonable repertoire of solos suitable for recital 
purposes, and be able to play easy accompaniments on the piano. 
Requirements for Harmony, History of Music and Ensemble are the 
same as in piano. Post graduate courses will be given on appli- 
cation. 

ORATORY 



The course in Oratory are designed to develop the students in 
the art of expression through gesture, speech and presence, with 
the special idea of helping those who are to become teachers. 

The methods employed overcome the effects of repression, stim- 
ulate free endeavor, increase "the joy of the working" and develop 
creative power. Each student is trained to express herself in many 
ways — in story telling, in dramatic personations, in oral composi- 
tion, in platform reading and in literary interpretation. The stu- 
dent is taught to think and feel before an audience and to express 
these thoughts and emotions through her own individuality. 

This results in a natural style, cultivates and refines literary 
taste, strengthens the imagination and develops personal power. 
Any student will find this study invaluable in teaching any other 
subject, because oratory tends to bring poise, freedom from self- 
consciousness, a responsive voice and body, a keener imagination, 
emotions aroused and directed to the expression of the best in 
one's nature. The following courses are offered to those desiring 
special study in Oratory, and will be given in one private lesson 
and three class lessons per week. The work is designed to cover 
a period of two years of study. 

A certificate in Oratory will be given to students completing the 
courses as outlined below and also the following subjects: Psychol- 
ogy; History of Education; Principles of Education; Methods; Eng- 
lish; Junior Literature; Psysiology; Modern Language; Common 
School Music; Art History; Physical Culture. 

A fee of $9.00 for nine weeks will be charged students of this 
department. 



STATE NORMAL SCHOOL 47 

1. Literary Interpretation. 

This course involves Evolution of Expression or the fundamental 
principles through which a student develops her powers of expres- 
sion; selections from literature; platform deportment; recitals. 

One hour per week throughout the year. Junior. 

2. Vocal Technique. 

This course deals with articulation: phonetics, speech formation, 
pronunciation, impediments of speech; technique; study and use of 
voice instrument, control of breath, reasonance, flexibility, power, 
freedom; expressive voice culture; tone language, exercises empha- 
sizing the cultivation of the imagination to produce strong, bril- 
liant and expressive voices. 

One hour per week throughout the year. Junior. 

3. Bodily Expression. 

The aim of Bodily Expression is to train the body to become the 
free responsive agent of the soul's expression. The course deals 
with physiology and psychology of gesture; harmony of action — 
hand exercises; pantomime. 

One hour per week throughout the year. Junior. 

4. Educational Dramatics. 

The great dynamic force, the drama, plays such an important 
part today in the development of the child that serious thought 
must be given to it. We believe, with President Eliot of Harvard, 
that dramatic instinct is a tremendous power over children that 
ought to be utilized for their good. It is the purpose of this course 
to give the student a working knowledge of directing children's 
plays. Plays are studied from the view of a reading lesson to the 
actual public presentation. Several Seniors during the year will 
have complete direction of a play, training children of the Ele- 
mentary School. This includes planning and making of scenery 
and costumes. 

One hour per week throughout the year. Senior. 

5. Story-telling. 

The most universal method of imparting knowledge and of im- 
pressing moral and spiritual truths is through story-telling. Here 
all knowledge of child psychology is applied and students become 
familiar with every type of story. A "Story Hour" is conducted by 
Oratory students every Monday. 

One hour per week throughout the year. Senior. 



4 $ STATE NORMAL SCHOOL 

6. Advanced Interpretation. 

This course involves a study of one act plays, the short story, 
and modern poetry. Recitals are given. 

One hour per week throughout the year. Senior. 

PHYSICAL EDUCATION 



Physical education aims at the highest possible condition of 
health, through proper physical development. The mind and spirit 
are largely dependent upon the condition and cultivation of the 
physical nature. Only through harmony of body, mind and spirit 
can the highest degree of efficiency be attained. 

Requirements. 

Every student in the school is required to take work in this de- 
partment. It is a law of the state that no student may graduate 
without work in Physical Education. Those who are not able to 
take the regular work are given a course in theory. 

Before graduation each student must complete at least two years 
of work in Physical Education. 

Gymnasium AVork. 

Work in this department includes free exercises, tactics, light 
apparatus, folk dancing, and games. The work is carefully graded 
to suit the needs of the various classes. In the Senior year normal 
training in regular class work is given. A fund of material for 
teaching purposes is accumulated and courses are given in the 
theory and practice of games and dances suitable for school room 
and playground. Special stress is placed upon a study of the 
health manual prescribed by the State Board of Education. 

Degree Course. 

This course will include work in the theory and practice of phys- 
ical education, such as hygiene, first* aid, methods, practice teach- 
ing, a study of the different systems of gymnastics, corrective work, 
advanced appartus, dancing and games. 

Three hours per week throughout the year. Degree Course. 

Athletics. 

The work of this department includes, in addition to the regular 
gymnastics, careful instruction in outdoor games and sports. A 
well equipped athletic field is provided for the use of the students. 
A number of Field Days are given during each year, and the vic- 
torious class is awarded the possession of a beautiful loving cup. 



STATE NORMAL SCHOOL 49 

Gymnasium Suit. 

The gymnasium suit adopted by the school consists of white 
middy blouse, black bloomers and black tennis slippers. These 
articles are part of the school uniform and must be purchased 
after reaching Athens. 

PUBLIC SPEAKING 



1. Public Speaking. 

This course includes lessons in articulation which involves free- 
dom of organs of speech; placement; accurate moulding of the 
elements of speech; pronunciation; also vocal technique which 
means breath control; development of resonance; placing of tones; 
purity, tone, projection, flexibility; compass; smoothness; power, 
and brilliancy of tones; freedom. Evolution of expression is the 
basal text. 

Three hours per week, one semester. Junior. Credit: 1V 2 hours. 

2. Public Speaking. 

To some extent, time during this course must be given to meth- 
ods, in order to prepare the students for teaching. This part of the 
work will consist in methods for Primary and Grammar grades, 
and will include lectures, discussions, and practical illustrative 
exercises. Some of the phases of reading studied are: the relation 
of reading to other studies in the curriculum; methods of getting 
good reading; enunciation and pronunciation; phonics; pitch, in- 
flection, modulation, model work; the development lesson; conduct 
of the reading lesson; emphasis of the importance of good oral 
reading on the part of the teacher. 

Three hours per week, one semester. Senior. Credit: 1 V2 hours. 

3. Public Speaking. 

The work in this course will consist in: Whatever pertains to 
preparing and delivering one's own speeches. Interpretation of 
great speeches, to train practical public speakers. A comprehensive 
study of principles, using masterpieces of oratory, and illustrative 
matter from current affairs, politics, reforms, advertisement, and 
any other subjects of interest. Impromptu and prepared speeches. 
Each student must select a major topic on which he will write 
several speeches. Each student will be required to prepare and 
deliver lectures on specified teaching problems or subjects. 

Three hours per week throughout the year. Junior Degree 
Course. Credit: 3 hours. 



50 STATE NORMAL SCHOOL 

ROMANCE LANGUAGES 



1. French. 

Optional with Latin and Spanish for State Normal School diploma. 
A course for beginners which consists of careful drill in pronuncia- 
tion, translation, conversation, dictation and the reading of easy 
French texts. No prerequisite. 

Three hours per week throughout the year. Junior. Credit: 3 
hours. 

2. French. 

Optional with Latin and Spanish for State Normal School diploma. 
Prerequisite: French 1 or its equivalent. This course is a con- 
tinuation of French 1. It consists of a thorough review of grammar 
and syntax, constant practice in translating English into French, 
conversation and extensive reading. 

Three hours per week throughout the year. Senior. Credit: 3 
hours. 

3. French. 

Optional to students who have had French 2 or its equivalent. 
This course consists of advanced work in French. Extensive read- 
ing in and out of the class room. Explanation of texts. Rhetoric, 
compositions and essays in French. Conversation, lectures in 
French on literary topics. 

Three hours per week throughout the year. Junior Degree. 
Credit: 3 hours. 

4. French. 

Prerequisite: French 3 or its equivalent. This is especially a 
course of practice in teaching and is open only to students who 
have had the three courses as outlined above, or their equivalent. 
Of the three hours scheduled, two will be given to practice in teach- 
ing and the other to lectures in French by the Professor. Besides, 
extensive outside reading and reports in French on the books read 
will be required. 

French 3 and French 4 will be required for a Baccalaureat de- 
gree of the State Normal School, if French is elected. 

Three hours per week. Senior Degree. Credit: 3 hours. 

1. Spanish. 

Optional with Latin and French for State Normal School diploma. 
A course for beginners which consists of careful drill in pronuncia- 
tion, translation, conversation, dictation and the reading of easy 
Spanish texts. No prerequisite. 



STATE NORMAL SCHOOL 51 

Three hours per week throughout the year. Junior. Credit: 3 
hours. 

3. Spanish. 

Optional with Latin and French for State Normal School diploma. 
Prerequisite: Spanish 1 or its equivalent. This course is a con- 
tinuation of Spanish 1. It consists of a thorough review of gram- 
mar and syntax, constant practice in translating English into 
Spanish, conversation and extensive reading. 

Three hours per week throughout the year. Senior. Credit: 3 
hqnrs. 

3. Spanish. 

Optional to students who have had Spanish 2 or its equivalent. 
This course consists of advanced work in Spanish. Extensive read- 
ing in and out of the class room. Explanation of texts. Rhetoric, 
compositions and essays in Spanish. Conversation, lectures in 
Spanish on literary topics. 

Three hours per week throughout the year. Junior Degree. 
Credit: 3 hours. 

4. Spanish. 

Prerequisite: Spanish 3 or its equivalent. This is especially a 
course of practice in teaching and is open only to students who have 
had the three courses as outlined above, or their equivalent. Of 
the three hours scheduled, two will be given to practice in teaching 
and the other to lectures in Spanish by the Professor. Besides, 
extensive outside reading and reports in Spanish on the books read 
will be required. 

Spanish 3 and Spanish 4 will be required for a Baccalaureat de- 
gree of the State Normal School, if Spanish is elected. 

Three hours per week throughout the year. Senior Degree. 
Credit: 3 hours. 



SCIENCE 

1. Physics. 

This course deals with a study of matter and force and the rela- 
tion of these to life and progress. The students are trained to get 
acquainted with the forms and forces around them and they also 
learn to make simple devices to use in the schools where no appa- 
ratus can be bought. Laboratory work is required. 

Three hours per week throughout the year. Freshman. 

2. Physics. 

This course treats of life and civilization as aided by force and 



52 STATE NORMAL SCHOOL 

energy, studied in connection with mechanics, heat, sound, light, 
magnetism, electricity, principles and applications of devices using 
energy. Laboratory work will be required. 

Three hours per week throughout the year. Junior Degree 
Course. Credit: 3 hours. 

3. Physics. 

This course will be a continuation of Physics 2. Special emphasis 
will be placed on the principles and applications of devices using 
energy. Laboratory work will be required. 

Three hours per week throughout the year. Senior Degree 
Course. Credit: 3 hours. 

1. Chemistry. 

Elements and inorganic compounds are studied. These subjects 
are taken up with the connection they bear to comfort and civiliza- 
tion. The relation of chemistry to the saving of many by-products 
of the home and farm will be considered. Laboratory work will 
be required. 

Three periods per week throughout the year. Sophon^re. 

2. Organic Chemistry. 

This course will embrace a study of the compounds, relations, 
uses, and properties of carbon, and will include laboratory work. 

Three hours per week throughout the year. Junior Degree 
Course. Credit: 3 hours. 

3. Household Chemistry. 

This course embraces a study of composition, uses, sources, prop- 
erties, and economics of compounds relating to life in the home. 

Three hours per week throughout the year. Senior Degree 
Course. Credit: 3 hours. 

Biology. 

The plan in this course is to study typical plants and animals, 
leading up to a more detailed study of human physiology, anatomy 
and hygiene. This includes the study of protoplasm, metabolism, 
growth, reproduction, heredity and evolution. Instruction is given 
in the use of a microscope, the preservation of specimens and the 
making of collections. The living organisms are studied when pos- 
sible; otherwise preserved specimens, models, microscopic sections, 
the stereoptican will be used. 

Three hours per week throughout the year. Freshman. 



STATE NORMAL SCHOOL 



Botany. 



In this course the structure, functions, classes and uses of plants 
will be studied. 

Three hours per week throughout the year. Junior Degree 
Course. Credit: 3 hours. 

Zoology. 

This is a study of functions, habitat, relations, comparisons of 
animal life. 

Three hours per week throughout the year. Senior Degree 
Course. Credit: 3 hours. 



CARNEGIE LIBRARY 



This building, as indicated by its name, was the gift of Mr. 
Andrew Carnegie. It is well equipped with Library Bureau furni- 
ture and contains about ten thousand volumes with something like 
three thousand pamphlets. The faculty and registered students of 
the school have free access to the library and may draw books for 
home reading. To the general public it is for reference only. 

The Reading Room is of infinite value to the students both for 
general reading and reference work. The following magazines are 
one file: American Cookery, American Journal of Education, Ameri- 
can Magazine, American School Board Journal, Atlantic Monthly, 
Bookman, Century, Country Life, Current History, New York Times:, 
Current Opinion, Delineator, Education, Educational Review, Ele- 
mentary School Journal, Good Housekeeping, Independent, Industrial 
Arts Magazine, Journal of Education, Journal of Home Economics, 
Journal of Psychology, Kindergarten and First Grade, Ladies' 
Home Journal, Literary Digest, Manual Training Magazine, Mis- 
sionary Review, Musical America, Nation, National Geographic, 
Nature Study Review, New Republic, North American Review, Nor- 
mal Instructor, Outlook, Playground, Progressive Farmer, Readers' 
Guide to Periodical Literature, Review of Reviews, Saturday Even- 
ning Post, School Arts Magazine, School Century, School and Home 
Education, School and Society, School Review, Survey, Teachers' 
College Record, Textile World, Travel, Woman's Home Companion, 
Worlds' Work, Yale Review, Harper's Monthly, Mentor, Hibbert's 
Journal, American City, Woman Citizen. These magazines are 
bound at the end of each school year and prove a most valuable 
aid in the Reference Department. 

The library is open daily (except Sunday) from 8:45 A. M. until 
5:30 P. M., closing for the dinner hour. Books other than "Re- 



54 STATE NORMAL SCHOOL 

serves" may be borrowed from the library for two weeks. Reserved 
books are issued overnight only. 

It is the main purpose of the library to both create and stimulate 
a taste for good literature as well as serve the various departments 
in their reference work. It is our ambition to give every student 
of every department a working knowledge of the institution and 
thereby double its value to the student body. 



CORRESPONDENCE COURSE 



Teaching by mail is becoming more popular every day, and the 
facilities have now been so perfected that there is no method of 
study which equals that of the correspondence plan for giving depth 
of scholarship and accurate knowledge of the subject studied. The 
State Normal School has so arranged its courses of study that all 
correspondence students will secure full credit for the work which 
they do at home should they decide eventually to attend the Normal 
School at Athens. 

These courses are prepared by the heads of departments who are 
specialists in these branches. Directions as to text-books and les- 
sons, and lists of review questions, will be sent to the student. 
When the student writes out the answers to these questions and 
sends in her papers these will be corrected and graded and again 
returned to the student. Credit will be entered upon the records of 
the State Normal School for the work done, and this credit will help 
the student, who can come to the school later and take resident 
work, to obtain the diploma offered by this institution. 

The charges for the courses are as follows: 

Common School Review Courses General Cultural Courses 

Arithmetic $5.00 Algebra $6.00 

Grammar 5.00 Geometry 6.00 

History, American _ _ _ _ 5.00 Latin __________ 6.00 

Physiology 5.00 Rhetoric 6.00 

Geography ________ 5.00 Literature ________ 6.00 

Agriculture _______ 5.00 Civil Government 6.00 

Reading 1 5.00 

Spelling 5.00 

General Pedagogical Course 

Dutton's "School Management." and Georgia School Law $5.00 

For full particulars in regard to any of these courses of study, 
address the President, State Normal School, Athens, Georgia. 



STATE NORMAL SCHOOL 55 

LECTURE COURSE 



The school maintains a Lyceum Course which is free to all the 
students of the school and in which are engaged the best platform 
performers we can procure. In addition to this, a series of lectures 
by prominent men and women in the state, who have accomplished 
things in the special line of work in which each is interested, is kept 
up throughout the year. 

Moreover, Athens affords the school wonderful opportunity of 
seeing and hearing those who have attained distinction along many 
lines of endeavor. The school, in fact, is at times embarrassed with 
the richness of its opportunities of this kind. From time to time 
such men as Dr. Campbell Morgan, Mr. George Foster Peabody and 
others of national reputation speak in the auditorium. But they 
are invaluable aids in giving finishing touches to the education 
which the school is striving to impart to its student body. 

MOTION PICTURES 



Motion pictures are frequently used by the various teachers to 
supplement their class-room instruction. This method of teaching 
has proven to be both interesting and instructive. 

The moving picture machine is also used by lecturers who visit 
the school and at such times when the students are not otherwise 
engaged some of the best popular films are shown. 

STUDENT ORGANIZATIONS 



1. The Young Women's Christian Association. 

The Young Women's Christian Association, through its social life, 
Bible study, mission study, church attendance and intercollegiate 
relationships, seeks to promote the spirit of Christian thinking and 
Christian living among students and to train them for Christian 
work. 

The Social Work consists in aiding new students to harmonious 
adjustment to the school life and its activities. 

The Course in Student Fellowship is carefully planned and the 
text books used are the newest and best, treating both home and 
foreign mission problems. 

Intercollegiate relationships have been established by delegations 
to the Georgia Student Volunteer Union, the Southern Conference 
of the Young Men's Christian Association, by visits of traveling 



56 STATE NORMAL SCHOOL 

student secretaries, delegates to the National Student Volunteer 
Convention, Cabinet training councils, visiting Secretaries of the 
churches and! W. C. T. U., and by the interchange of reports and 
methods with other associations. 

Church attendance is emphasized in order that the students may 
derive all the spiritual benefits possible from the excellent church 
facilities of Athens. 

2. Bible Study. 

The purpose of this course is to give such a general knowledge 
of the Bible as will furnish to the students a background for future 
work in detail. 

The lessons are arranged for systematic daily readings through 
the Bible, beginning with Genesis. Weekly reviews are held on 
these readings, bringing out such points about the great Book as 
every person ought to know. 

The aim of the teachers in presenting these lessons is to bring 
the students into loving acquaintance with God's Word. This course 
covers four years. 

The First Year's Course embraces the Law and History of the 
Hebrew Nation as found in the Bible from Genesis to Esther in- 
clusive. 

The Second Year's Course is a study of the Poetry and Prophecy 
of the Bible, beginning with the book of Job and extending through 
the Old Testament. 

The Third Year's Course is the Life of Christ, or the historical 
study of the four Gospels. The lessons are so arranged as to bring 
together the corresponding parts of the four Gospels for comparison. 
There is no attempt made to study these parts critically, but simply 
to present the facts as given by the four writers. 

The Fourth Year's Course is a study of the Acts of the Apostles, 
of the Epistles, and of Revelation. 

This course is entirely optional, but all students are encouraged 
to join one of these classes, and due recognition is given their work 
in the permanent records of the school. 

The Bible classes are taught by members of the Faculty. 

The State Normal School won second honor in this work in the 
United States at the Panama Exposition Young Women's Christian 
Associational National Contest in 1915. 

There has been an interest in the memorizing of Scripture pre- 
scribed by Helen Gould Shepherd, for which she presents a Student's 
Bible. The school has won 246 of these Bibles. 

Since 1922 Mrs. Gertrude Alexander has been giving the Campbell 
Morgan edition of the Bible. Last year eight were won. Bringing 
our number to 256. 



STATE NORMAL SCHOOL 57 

Students are urged to keep in their respective classes in Bible 
work as in other studies. 

The State Normal School won first honor in the United States on 
the Student Association Honor Roll at the Panama Exposition for 
the largest average in production to total enrollment in Mission 
Study and Social Welfare classes in 1915. The School won second 
honor places in the two subjects that follow: volunteer Bible Study 
classes and attendance on religious services. 

3. Woman's Christian Temperance Union. 

In conjunction with the Young Woman's Christian Association 
work of the school, there is an organized Woman's Christian Tem- 
perance Union which holds regular meetings once per month and 
endeavors to further the study and interest in the Temperance 
Cause. 

4. Altioria Literary Society. 

At one time there was only one society in the State Normal School. 
On account of the overwhelming number of members it was advised 
that two societies be formed. In 1905 the two literary societies, 
under their new names, Mildred Rutherford and Altioria, began 
their work anew. Professor Earnest gave us our name "Altioria," 
meaning higher and better. Since the date of our birth, under the 
aim and excellent prevailing spirit of our motto, "Excelsior," we have 
been growing each year, striving for the supernal and superior 
things in our school life. The aim of the Altioria Society is the 
advancement of scholarship by enjoying together the best to be 
found in literature and the development of "Ideal Womanhood" 
through faithfulness and usefulness to our school and to our fellows. 

5. The Mildred Rutherford Literary Society. 

The aim of this society is to develop the literary phase of the 
student life through the creation of an interest in and appreciation 
for literature, music and art. The betterment of the social life of 
the school is the result of the activities of this organization and it 
is in this connection that some of the closest friendships are formed 
which exist not only while in attendance here but the influence of 
which will be felt into the future. 

An example of the highest type of womanhood is set before the 
girls in the sponsor of the organization, Miss Mildred Rutherford, 
whose fine and noble character and the ideals for which she stands 
are ever a beacon light to those who know her. 

6. I/Alliance Francaise. 

One of the distinctive features of the French course is the oppor- 
tunity of the students to affiliate with the L'Alliance Francaise, an 
organization composed of those familiar with and interested In the 



58 STATE NORMAL SCHOOL 

French language both in this school and the other educational in- 
stitutions of the city. Meetings are held once a month, at which 
time prominent French scholars address the organization on some 
topic of general interest. This organization has been a means of 
creating a greater interest in and a wider knowledge for the French 
language. 

The Honorary President of the L'Alliance Francaise (Athens 
group) is Chancellor D. C. Barrow of the University, and the Pres- 
ident, Professor J. Lustrat, head of the department of Romance 
Languages at the University and at the Normal School. 

7. Glee Club. 

The purpose of this organization is recreative choral work as well 
as to afford an opportunity for the study of classical compositions. 
Membership is open to any member of the student body. The or- 
ganization gives two concerts annually and assists at other functions 
of the school. 

8. County Clubs. 

Nearly every county in Georgia is represented at the State Normal. 
Many of these counties have enough students to organize and there 
are more than twenty county clubs. There are a number of benefits 
to be derived from these clubs. Among the most important are — a 
definite way to study home county and home conditions; a united 
band to ai din the development of county affairs; a splendid way for 
those from home to get together; a medium to interest other students 
in the school; a source of great pleasure and leisure. These clubs are 
doing splendid, constructive work. More counties are to be orga- 
nized and it is the aim of all of them to keep up the supply of mem- 
bers from year to year and to be of real SERVICE to the people at 
home. 

9. The Round Table. 

The Round Table is a gathering of all students who desire to at- 
tend at a regular meeting every Saturday night just when supper 
is over. The organization is nine years old and its aim is to furnish 
wholesome recreation and to develop a love for and a power to tell 
the best stories to be found in our literature. Current topics are 
discussed, songs rendered and some pleasing story told and com- 
mented on. This organization started with but six members at its 
inception, and now has increased in size until there is no room on 
the school campus that will hold the attendance without crowding. 

10. Athletic Association. 

The Athletic Association is an organization of the students to pro- 



STATE NORMAL SCHOOL 59 

mote and encourage outdoor sports and athletics and is under the 
direct supervision of the Department of Physical Education. 

The Association has a well-equipped athletic field, with courts for 
tennis, basketball, volley ball and other games. Field Days and 
various athletic contests stimulate interest in outdoor activities and 
provide sane, wholesome recreation. 

11. Alumni-ae Association. 

The Alumni-ae Association of the State Normal School is an or- 
ganization concerned with the welfare of the school and its alumni- 
ae, and with the professional advancement of education. It is the 
channel through which the school and its alumni-ae can be of mutual 
help to each other. Its purpose is to provide a scholarship fund, to 
promote loyalty to the school, and to disseminate the ideals for 
which the school stands. 

All graduates of the school are active members of the Association 
and all persons, who have at any time been students of the school, 
are associate members. 

The officers of the Association are as follows: President, Kate E. 
Hicks; Secretary, Iris Callaway; Treasurer, Mrs. H. C. Doolittle. 

12. Normal Light. 

The Normal Light is the student paper. It is issued in newspaper 
style. It is printed twice a month. All general school news; society 
dots; editorials; literary society pages; Y. W. C. A. notes and jokes 
form the basis of its development. The editors are elected from 
the student body. They do all the writing for the paper under the 
supervision of a faculty member. 

13. Crystal. 

The Crystal is the Senior Annual. Every Senior class publishes a 
Crystal. The book appears at the end of the year. It is a memory 
book in printed form. The editors are elected from the Senior class. 

STATISTICS FOR 1923-24 

Registered students to date (March 5, 1924), 661; students 
registered during Summer School, 469; pupils in Muscogee Ele- 
mentary School and Country School, 295; students registered for 
Correspondence Courses, 50; total, i,475. 

Teachers and officers, 55. Counties represented by students, 130. 
Students holding diplomas from other schools, 444; students hold- 
ing first grade license, 65; second grade license, 43; students hav- 
ing experience in teaching, 69. Fifty percent of all our students are 
the sons and daughters of farmers. 

The total registration since the foundation of the school, 15,269, 



60 STATE NORMAL SCHOOL 

more than 90 percent of whom have since taught in our common 
schools. Total graduates to June, 1923, 2,128. Graduating class 
this year numbers, 232. 

Buildings: Academic buildings, 4; Dormitory buildings, 4; Din- 
ing Hall and Senior Hall building, 1; Rural School, 1; Carnegie 
Library, 1; Infirmary, 1; Practice Home, 1; Dairy barn, 1; Stock 
barn, 1. Total, 15. 



STATE NORMAL SCHOOL 

ROLL OF STUDENTS 1923-24 



61 



Senior Degree 



Name County 

Bailey, Flora Clarke 

Carson, Mabel Jackson 

Corley, Lucy Belle _ Early 

Drake, Daisy Clarke 

Echols, Katie Sue _ Orange, S. C. 
Harvey, Josephine _ _ _ Sumter 
Hubert, Blanche Clarke 



Name 

Hughes, Mildred _ 
Kelley, Lillie Mae 
Mears, Annylu _ _ 
Pentecost, Mary _ 
Sammon, Florence 
Younge, Augusta _ 



County 

. _ Clarke 
_ _ Upson 
_ Decatur 
Gwinnett 
. Gwinnett 
Polk 



Junior Degree 

Hall, Mary Richmond 



Senior 



Abercrombie, Ethel _ _ Monroe 

Adams, Fanibel Fulton 

Anderson, Sadie Mae _ _ Jasper 

Artau, Delores Glynn 

Bailey, Annie _____ Clarke 
Bailey, Mary Lou _ _ Sumpter 

Baker, Julia Madison 

Baldwin, Myrtle _ _ _ Sumpter 
Barnett, Labassare _ _ Madison 

Barnwell, Edna Hall 

Barnwell, Martha _____ Hall 
Barrett, Lerlin _ _ _ _ Madison 
Benton, Frances _ _ Meriwether 
Bell, Jewel _______ Clarke 

Bittick, Estelle Bibb 

Bloodworth, Lillie Bibb 

Boiling, Naomi _ _ Chattooga 
Bowen, Ruth ______ Milton 

Boykin, Elizabeth _ _ _ Carroll 

Brackett, Pauline Clarke 

Brady, Cora ______ Elbert 

Braselton, Thelma _ _ Jackson 
Braswell, LaRhue _ Meriwether 

Breedlove, Louise Coffee 

Brewton, Ida _____ Evans 
Bridges, Birdie _ _ _ _ Twiggs 
Bridges, Bruna _ _ _ _ Twiggs 



Bridges, Lucy Terrell 

Brown, Jessie Washington 

Brown, Edith _ _ _ _ Pulaski 

Brunson, Dorothy Houston 

Burnett, Mamie _ _ _ _ Sumter 
Burroughs, Lucile _ _ Madison 
Burt, Ada Mott _ _ _ _ Sumter 

Calhoun, Nina Crisp 

Camp, Jonnie _ - Fulton 

Carroll, Grace Washington 

Cartledge, Sara Lincoln 

Chapman, Willie Maude.Screven 

Chastain, Lila Thomas 

Cheney, Beth Randolph 

Clark, Ruth Muscogee 

Collins, Dorothy _ _ _ _ Schley 
Collins, Lillie _____ Grady 
Colvin, Elizabeth _ _ _ Henry 

Combs, Gladys Henry 

Cooper, Sara Taylor 

Conyers, Ruth Bartow 

Copeland, Edith Thomas 

Coulter, Marjorie _ _ Muscogee 
Cross, Florence _ _ _ Dougherty 
Cubbedge, Victoria _ _ Chatham 

Daniel, Mary Heard 

Davis. P.fssie Mae Brooks 



62 



STATE NORMAL SCHOOL 



Name County 

Davis, Vera Mae _ _ _ _ Gilmer 

Digby, Mary _______ Pike 

Dillard, Frances _ _ _ _ Wilkes 

Dillard, Mildred _ _ Oglethorpe 

Dolvin, Margaret Newton 

Duggan, Georgia _ _ _ Pulaski 

Dumas, Ruth Taylor 

Duncan, Bess Oglethorpe 

Dunson, Jennie _____ Troup 
Edwards, Lillian _ _ _ _ Clarke 
Ethridge, Adele _ _ _ _ Sumter 

Ethridge, Clara Sumter 

Fanning, Annie Sue McDuffie 

Farmer, Sara Jefferson 

Frazier, Anne _ _ _ _ Jeff Davis 
Garrett, Jewell _ _ _ _ Walton 
Gaylord, Alberta _ _ Muscogee 
Gerkin, Addie _ _ _ _ Chatham 
George, Elizabeth _ _ _ Fulton 
Gibson, Florence _ _ _ _ Troup 
Gibbs, Elizabeth _____ Tift 
Gnann, Rebecca _ _ _ Effingham 

Godwin, Ila Meriwether 

Gorden, Sarah _____ Gordon 
Gregors, Ruth _ _ _ _ Mitchell 
Gresham, Jessie _ _ _ _ Fulton 
Griner, Louise _ _ _ _ Mitchell 

Guest, Ethel Sumter 

Hale, Ruth ______ Clarke 

Hamrick, May Belle _ _ Pickens 

Hancock, Ethel _ _ Clarke 

Hardeman, Mildred Clarke 

Harris, Lena Mae _ _ _ Catoosa 
Harvey, Jimmie _ _ _ _ Sumter 
Hawes, Ava ______ Lincoln 

Hays, Olivia Lee 

Hays, Helen _______ Lee 

Hembree, Ozella _ _ _ _ Cobb 

Hemrick, Era _ _ _ _ Oconee 

Hester, Wyoline _ _ _ Douglas 
Hicks, Annie Marlin _ _ Macon 

Hill, Bernice _ _ _ Banks 

Hill, LaTrelle Jackson 



Name County 

Hind, Minnie _ _ _ Dougherty 

Hipp, Bertha Gilmer 

Hirsch, Josephine _ _ Chatham 
Holliday, Edith _ _ _ _ Jackson 
Hooten, Eleanor _ _ Meriwether 

Howard, Alice Houston 

Hughes, Roxane _ _ _ _ Tattnal 
Hunter, Lucy Lowe _ Oglethorpe 

Hutchins, Myrtice Clarke 

Ingram, Eugenia _ _ _ Carroll 
Johnson, Mrs. Hollis _ _ Clarke 
Joiner, Frances _ _ _ Laurens 
Johnson, Bernice _ _ _ _ Sumter 
Johnson, Carrie _ _ Meriwether 
Johnson, Elsa Ann _ _ Clarke 
Jones, Lucy _____ Laurens 
Jones, Lorena _ _ _ _ Morgan 
Jones, Maude _____ Walton 
Jordon„ Elizabeth _ _ _ Jasper 
Jordan, Lucile _ _ Washington 
Jordon, Louise _____ Wilkes 
Kerlin, Myra Lee _ _ _ _ Clarke 

Keese, Catherine Randolph 

Keese, Mary Lou _ _ Randolph 
Kehrer, Mary Grace _ Gwinnett 
Reiser, Martha ______ Bibb 

Kelley, Grace Lee _ Upson 

Kelley, Louise _ _ _ Gwinnett 
Kenney, James Paul _ _ Lincoln 
Kerlin, Myra Lee _ _ _ Clarke 
Kicklighter, Lothare _ Tattnall 
King, Syvie _____ Webster 

Kitchens, Christine _ _ _ Terrell 
Lane, Beulah ______ Evans 

Lenneau, Gracie _ _ _ Chatham 
Lewis, Eula ______ Lincoln 

Lindsey, Ruth _ _ _ _ Walton 

Littlejohn, Annie _ _ _ Walker 
Lovett, Etta _ _ _ _ Meriwether 

McDonald, Sara _ _ _ Jackson 
McGahee, Earline _ _ _ Warren 
McGee, Montine _ _ _ Gwinnett 
McRee, Mavis _____ Oconee 



STATE NORMAL SCHOOL 



63 



Name County 

Maddox, Ermine _ _ Gwinnett 

Mathis, Ethel Floyd 

Matthews, Nora Paulding 

Martin, Agnes _____ Carroll 
May, Agnes _ _ _ Washington 
Meadows, Nell _____ Carroll 
Means, Mary _____ Decatur 

Millton, Lillian _ Chatham 

Mitchell, Annie _____ Rabun 
Mitchell, Ruth Clare _ _ Rabun 

Mitchell, Irene _ _ Bibb 

Moon, Pearl _____ Campbell 
Moore, Elizabeth _ _ _ Wilkes 
Morton, Elizabeth _ _ _ Stewart 
Myers, Sallie Mae _ _ _ Clarke 

Neal, Rebecca Harris 

Nelson, Myra _____ Jasper 
Newberry, Doris _____ Bibb 
Norman, Ruby _ _ _ _ Wilkes 
Northcutt, Sara Frances _ Cobb 
Nussbaun, Lillian _ _ Chatham 
Oakes, Gladys _ _ _ Gwinnett 

O'Kelley, Lillian _ Clarke 

Orr, Agnes _ _ _ _ Washington 

Orr, Evelyn _____ Coweta 

Overby, Clara _ _ _ _ Stewart 

Paris, Kate ______ Rabun 

Parsons, Lucy Grace _ _ Banks 
Patterson, Mae _____ Banks 

Patterson, Mary _ _ _ Jefferson 

Pennington, Gussie Jefferson 

Pickett, Violet _____ Tift 
Pittman, Agnes _____ Bibb 
Powell, Mattie Belle _ _ Mitchell 
Prater, Clara Mae _ _ Gwinnett 
Pullen, Effie _____ Early 
Rankin, Elizabeth _ _ DeKalb 
Ray, Camille _ _ _ _ Wilkes 
Rish, Elise _______ Clay 

Roberts, Helen Jefferson 

Robinson, Willie Maude _ Troup 
Sanford, Lois _ _ _ _ Crawford 
Scott, Nell Miller 



Name County 

Shackleford, Louise _ _ Wilcox 
Shell, Flossie _ _ _ _ Campbell 

Sherrer, Edith Wilkes 

Shiflett, Nellie Marie Chattooga 
Sims, Clifford _____ Lamar 
Smith, Lena _ _ _ _ Oglethorpe 
Smith, Mattie Ree _ _ _ _ Clay 

Smith, Nettie _ Houston 

Spratling, Susie Mae _ _ Coweta 
Stallings, Sara _ _ _ _ Coweta 

Stalworth, Blannie _ _ Laurens 
Story, Lucia ______ Harris 

Sturdivant, Alma _ _ _ Burke 
Swilling, Evelyn _ _ _ _ Clarke 

Taylor, Eva ______ Lamar 

Taylor, Ruby ______ Lamar 

Templeton, Ruby _ _ _ _ Burke 

Tillman, Eva _____ Clinch 

Thomas, Jewell Franklin 

Thomas, Ruby _ _ _ _ Franklin 
Thompson, Virginia _ Gwinnett 

Toole, Willie Miller 

Tucker, Lucile ______ Jones 

Turner, Dorothy _ _ _ _ Terrell 

Vaughn, Pearl _____ Wilkes 

Vining, Mary ___.._ Upson 
Walden, Lois _ _ _ _ Chatham 

Walker, Jane ______ Clarke 

Walker, Lyle _____ Rockdale 

Wallace, Anne _ _ _ _ Houston 

Wallace, Mary _____ Harris 

Walters, Inez _ _ _ _ Stephens 

Walters, Louise _ _ _ Sumter 
Wehunt, Lois _____ Clarke 

Wells, Edna _____ Laurens 

Wells, Grace _____ Oconee 

West, Marion ______ Hall 

Whitaker, Marion _ _ Richmond 
Wilkins, Mildred _ _ _ Madison 
Wilkins, Helen _ _ _ Chatham 
Williams, Mary _____ Harris 

Williams, Sara Lee Meriwether 
Wills, Lillian _____ Jack-on 



64 



STATE NORMAL SCHOOL 



Name County 

Wilson, Dessa _ _ _ _ Newton 

Whitniire, Massie Mae Hall 

Wolf, Gladys _ _ _ _ Chatham 



Name 



County 



Woodward, Mary _____ Tift 

Wright, Addie Dekalb 

Zeagler ,Iree _ _ _ _ Screven 



Adams, Annie _ 

Adams, Grace _ _ Meriwether 

Aderholt, Edna Franklin 

Alexander, Chelma Thomas 

Almon, Nellie _ _ _ Meriwether 
Arnold, Caroline _ _ _ Coweta 
Atkinson, Agnes _ _ _ _ Clarke 
Bagley, Ethel _ _ _ Muscogee 
Bailey, Bobbie _____ Troup 

Ballard, Ruby Pike 

Banks, Evelyn _ _ Meriwether 

Barnett, Jewell Oconee 

Barnett, Nellie _ _ Taliaferro 
Brown, Jessie _ _ _ Washington 

Beckam, Lucile _ Houston 

Beddingfield, Louise _ _ Dooley 
Vivins, Sara ______ Jones 

Blanchett, Willie Mae _ Walton 
Boatner, Sara Lillie _ _ Clarke 

Bond, Lera Maud Madison 

Bond, Rena _____ Madison 
Bonner, Macy _ _ _ _ Lincoln 
Bowen, Ella Mae _ _ _ Franklin 
Bradfield, Avy _____ Henry 
Breedlove, Lula _____ Coffee 
Brown, Clyde _____ Dodge 

Brown, Eurilla Franklin 

Brown, Ruby Fulton 

Burgess, Grace _____ Wilkes 

Burrell, Willie Rabun 

Burson, Mary _____ Carroll 
Caldwell, Lizabeth _ _ _ Harris 
Callier, Mattimae _ _ _ Talbot 

Cantrell, Agnes Gordon 

Cash, Montine _ _ _ _ Gwinnett 
Castlen, Marianne _ _ _ Monroe 

Chance, Florence Chatham 

Chandler, Tullie _ _ _ Oconee 



Junior 

Meriwether Chastain, Lota _ _ _ _ Thomas 
Cheney, Mary _ _ _ _ Randolph 
Christian, Mary _ _ _ _ Newton 
Chunn, Mae _ _ _ Meriwether 
Clenney, Inez _ _ _ _ Calhoun 

Cliett, Ruth Mitchell 

Coachman, Fannie Mae Seminole 
Cochran, Lucile _____ Cobb 
Coile, Florence _ _ _ _ Clarke 
Collins, Dessie _ _ _ _ Barrow 
Collins, Louise _ _ _ _ Clarke 

Combs, Pauline _ Troup 

Conaway, Clarice _ _ _ Clarke 
Cook, Mary ______ Walton 

Cooper, Jeanette _ _ Gwinnett 
Cowan, Grace _____ Clayton 

Cox, Johnny _____ Clarke 

Cox, Lila Clarke 

Cox, Thelma Taylor 

Craig, Gippie _ _ _ _ Gwinnett 
Craven, Helen _ _ _ _ Haraloon 
Crawford, Helen _ _ _ _ Harris 
Crawford, Mamie _____ Bibb 

Crosby, A. G. _ Wilkinson 

Crow, Fay ______ Mitchell 

Crowley, Edith _ _ _ _ McDuffle 

Culpepper, Virginia Meriwether 
Dallas, Kathryn _ _ _ _ Upson 

Davis, Belle _ _ _ _ Gwinnett 

Dickerson, Adel _ _ _ Sumter 
Dickinson, Mattye _ _ _ Sumter 
Downs, Blanche _ _ _ _ Oconee 

Drewry, Ethel Mae _ _ _ _ Pike 

Drewry, Josephine _ _ _ _ Pike 

Driskell, Chas. M. _ _ _ Clarke 

Duggan, Mary Wyl Pulaski 

Dunahoo, Julia _ _ _ _ Barrow 
Dunson, Jennie _____ Troup 



STATE NORMAL SCHOOL 



65 



Name County 

Eaves, Celeste _ _ _ _ Haralson 
Eberhardt, Ruth _ _ _ Jackson 

Edwards, Carolyne Fulton 

Edwards, Grace _ _ _ _ Clarke 

Ellerbee, Dunnie Randolph 

Evans, Elizabeth _ _ Jefferson 

Everett, Cora Mae Bulloch 

Eyler, Mary _____ Chatham 

Flanigan, Mamie Lou _ Lincoln 
Flannery, Virginia _ _ Coweta 
Forrest, Reina Mae _ _ Sumter 
Gardner, Susan _ _ _ _ DeKalb 

Garrett, Mary _____ Walton 

Garrett, Sarah _ _ _ _ Wilkes 

Gartleman, Josephine Chatham 
Gates, Vivian _____ Troup 

Gholston, Mary Lucy _ _ Clarke 
Gibson, Helen _ _ _ _ Laurens 

Gilmore, Mildred _ _ _ Turner 
Gleaton, Gladys _ _ _ _ Worth 

Glenn, Florrie _ _ _ _ Oconee 

Glisson, Louise _ _ _ _ Thomas 

Goodwin, Lucy _____ Macon 

Green, Ruby ______ Jones 

Griffith, Ruby Lee _ _ Madison 
Grimes, Lois _____ Clarke 

Guest, Irlene _____ Sumter 

Guillebeau, Ina _ _ _ _ Lincoln 

Gunnels, Lynda _ _ _ _ Screven 

Haddock, Claudie Clarke 

Halliday, Josephine _ _ Stewart 
Halman, Lois ______ Troup 

Hammock, Frances _ _ _ Jones 
Hamrick, Laura Mae _ Haralson 
Hampton, Anne Mae _ _ Madison 
Hardman, Annie Lee _ _ Clarke 
Harman, Mildred _ _ _ Carroll 
Harris, Daisy _____ Terrell 

Harrison, Maymelu _ _ Johnson 
Hay, Annie Mary _____ Lee 

Hayes, Urania _____ Barrow 

Hellman, Rosalyn _ _ Chatham 
Henderson. Lucile Jasper 



Name County 

Henley, Kathryn _ _ Chattooga 
Henry, Martha _ _ _ _ Walker 

Hewell, Frances _ - Wilkes 

Hinley, Pearl Effingham 

Holbrook, Esther Franklin 

Hollowell, Dorothy _ _ Chatham 
Holman, Lois _____ Troup 
Holman, Vesta _ _ _ _ Sumter 
Holt, Sara _____ Chatham 
Howard, Patsy _ Chattahoochee 
Howell, Alberta _ _ _ _ Dooley 
Hubbart, Annie _ _ _ _ Troup 

Hubbard, Evelyn Franklin 

Hudson, Elizabeth _ Dougherty 

Humphreys, Ruth Pulaski 

Hubert, Virginia Clarke 

Jackson, Cleo Jones 

James, Emeline _ _ _ _ Taylor 
Jenkins, Mrs. W. E. _ _ Clarke 

Jennings, Margaret Clarke 

Johnson, Essie Mae _ _ Muscogee 
Johnson, Fay _ _ _ Franklin 
Johnson, Lois _ _ _ _ Madison 
Johnson, Vivian _ _ _ _ Early 

Jones, Emily _ _ _ _ Jones 

Jordan, Helen Terrell 

Jordan, Opal _ _ _ _ Muscogee 
Kidd, Agnes _____ Baker 

King, Mattie Jefferson 

Kinney, B. C. Lincoln 

Lackerman, Jessie _ _ _ Dooly 

Lane, Dorothy _ _ _ Jasper 

Lanier, Ruth _ _ _ _ DeKalb 

Lanier, Thelma _ _ Screven 

Lattay, Johnnie _ _ Oglethorpe 

Lathan, Helen Fulton 

Lazarus. Daisy _ _ _ _ Glynn 

Leybourne, Eloise _ _ _ Glynn 
Lifsey, Eliza _____ Taylor 

Lindsey, Flossie _ _ _ _ Clay 

Lively. lone _ _ _ _ Oglethorpe 

Long, Sara ________ Lee 

Loyd, Martha _____ Troup 



66 



STATE NORMAL SCHOOL 



Name County 

McElwaney, Louna _ _ _ Coweta 

McLellan, Hazel Mitchell 

Mallard, Maggie Lee _ Chatham 
Mallery, Louise _ _ _ Chatham 
Mann, Allene _____ Fulton 
Mann, Martha, _ _ Meriwether 
Manry, Alice _____ Mitchell 
Mansfield, Nellie _ _ _ _ Wilkes 
Mapp, Gladys _____ Clarke 
Maxwell, Martha _ _ _ _ Talbot 
Meadows, Louise _ _ Taliaferro 
Meadows, Reba _ _ _ _ Tatnall 
Merritt, Jewell _ _ _ _ Webster 
Michels, Betty _ _ _ _ Chatham 

Miller, Florence _ Jackson 

Miller, Margaret _ _ _ _ Bibb 
Mills, Gladys _ _ _ _ Randolph 
Milton, Ellmore _ _ _ Jefferson 
Milton, Marie _____ Gilmer 
Moncrief, Elizabeth _ _ Coweta 
Moon, Louise _____ Walton 
Morcock, Orlena _ _ _ Chatham 
Murrah, Helen _ _ _ _ Carroll 
Nelson, Frances _____ Bibb 
Newby, Alice _____ Dooly 
Nicholson, Mabel _ _ _ Oconee 
Norwood, Susie _ _ _ Chatham 
Pace, Leila Maude _ _ _ Terrell 
Parker, Emma Lula _ Franklin 

Parks, Beatrice _ Henry 

Partridge, Virginia _ _ Lincoln 
Pearce, Mabel _ _ _ _ Randolph 
Peacock, Evelyn _ _ _ _ Dodge 
Peek, Annie Laurie _ _ Newton 
Pennington, Hattie _ _ Jefferson 
Pennington, Maude _ _ McDuffie 

Perryman, Mildred Randolph 

Persons, Elsie _____ Upson 

Petrie, Idelle ______ Cobb 

Pickett, Mary Frances Newton 
Poindexter, Anna _ _ Calhoun 
Polk, Vivian _ _ _ _ Effingham 

Poole, Ruby _____ Gwinnett 



Name County 

Porterfield, Ruth Clarke 

Price, Louise _ _ _ Clarke 

Price, Minnie Mae _ _ Johnson 
Prince, Ruth _ _ _ _ Crawford 
Quattlebaum, Fay _ _ _ Barrow 
Read, Tillie Azile _ _ _ Oconee 
Redding, Louise Chattahoochee 
Richards, Leola _____ Hall 
Robinson, Sophie _ _ _ _ Glynn 
Rountree, Edyth _ _ Richmond 
Rowe, Myrtle _ _ _ _ Gwinnett 
Ruddell, Lois _____ Gordon 
Russell, Willie Mae _ _ Jones 
Rutherford, Fay _ _ _ _ Greene 
Sanders, Frances _ _ _ Jackson 
Satterwhite, Mildred _ _ Fulton 

Saunders, Margaret Taylor 

Scales, Mary _____ Banks 
Scott, Mary Frances _ Madison 
Scott, Janie _____ Calhoun 
Shelton, Ruby _ _ _ _ Warren 
Shepard, Hazel _ _ _ _ Miller 

Shockley, Edna Morgan 

Scholar, Alice ______ Hall 

Sims, Louise _____ Clarke 

Smith, Bessie _____ Greene 

Smith, Dorothy _ _ _ _ Dodge 

Smith, Grace _ _ _ _ Houston 

Smith, Harriet Grace _ _ Fulton 
Smith, Hazel _____ Talbot 

Smith, Louise _____ Oconee 

Smith, Mildred _____ Harris 

Smith, Miriam _____ Talbot 

Smith, Ovida _ _ _ _ Calhoun 

Smith, Sara ______ Wilkes 

Sockwell, Mary _ _ _ _ Newton 

Spears, Annie _ _ _ _ Newton 

Stanfield, Nona Mae _ _ Tatnall 
Stephens, Mary Frances DeKalb 
Stevens, Thelma _ _ _ Mitchell 
Stewart, Mollie _ _ _ _ Terrell 

Still, Mary _____ Rockdale 

Stokes, Grace ______ Bibb 



STATE NORMAL SCHOOL 



67 



Name County 

Stone, Myrtle _____ Clarke 
Stovall, Janie Lee _ _ Madison 
Stovall, Ruth _____ Elbert 
Strickland, Hallie Sue — — 
________ Oglethorpe 

Stripline, Elizabeth Harris 

Stripline, Mary Talbot 

Sutlive, Josephine _ _ Chatham 
Tabor, Elizabeth _ _ _ Madison 
Taylor, Furlow _ _ _ _ Macon 

Taylor, Pauline _ _ Dooly 

Templeton, Beatrice _ Richmond 
Templeton, Lillian _ Richmond 
Tharpe, Julia Drane _ _ Turner 
Thaxton, Mrs. J. R. _ _ Clarke 
Thompson, Annelea _ Chatooga 
Thompson, Blannie _ _ _ Harris 
Thompson, Lorena _ _ Walton 
Thornton, Virginia _ _ _ Clarke 
Thrasher, Louise _ _ _ Turner 
Thrasher, Sara _ _ _ Rockdale 
Tiller, Mary _____ Berrien 
Tucker, Fannie Lou _ _ Barrow 
Turner, Biby _ _ _ Meriwether 
Vance, Adelaide _ _ _ Gwinnett 
Verner, Ina _____ Walton 
Verner, Sarah _ _ Oconee, S. C. 



Name 

Wasdin, Julia _ _ _ 
Waters, Ida Mae _ _ 
Waters, Lois _ _ _ . 
Watkins, Christine _ 
W T atkins, Lura Almari 
Watts, Mary _ _ _ _ 
Weaver, Lola _ _ _ . 
Welch, Emma _ _ _ 
Westbrook, Ethel _ _ 
Whatley, Victoria _., 

White, Helen 

Whittington, Edna _ 
Wiley, Myrtie Marie 
Wilhite, Helena _ _ 
Wilkins, Helen _ _ _ 
Williams, Mary E. _ 
Williams, Nelle _ _ 
Williamson, Odessa _ 
Wilson, Cortez _ _ _ 
Wilson, Jewel Mae _ 
Wilson, Thelma _ _ 
Wood, Christine _ _ 
Wood, Memphis _ _ 
Wood, Mozelle _ _ . 
Worsham, Ruth _ _ . 
Wynn, Edith _ _ _ 
Wynne, Mattie _ _ _ 



County 

_ _ Bibb 

Hall 

. _ _ Hall 
_ _ Talbot 
ne Douglas 
_ _ Rabun 
. _ Walker 
_ _ Butts 
. _ Stewart 
_ _ Macon 
_ Spalding 
_ _ Taylor 
_ Stephens 
_ _ Clarke 
. _ Fayette 
_ Gwinnett 
Meriwether 
_ _ Clarke 
_ Jackson 
_ _ Harris 
_ _ Coweta 
_ Coweta 
_ Gwinnett 
. _ Greene 
_ _ DeKalb 
_ _ Bibb 
Oglethorpe 



Sophomore 

Adams, Sylvia _____ Fulton 
Banks, Bertie Violina _ Stephens 
Barlowe, Ethel _____ Dooly 
Baston, Lucile _____ Wilkes 
Bennett, Sara _ _ _ _ Clarke 
Berry, Elizabeth _ _ _ _ Lamar 
Bostwick, Alice _ _ _ _ Morgan 
Boyett, Maude _ _ _ Randolph 
Camp, Ella _____ Coweta 
('handler, Molene _ _ _ Madison 
Cocraft, Louise _____ Bibb 
Crawford, Mabry _ _ _ _ Clarke 
Crowley, Lucile _ _ _ _ Clarke 



Culpepper, Margaret 
Dunstan, Grace _ _ 
Darnell, Otee _ _ _ _ 
Flemming, Paul _ _ 
Fowler, Carrie _ _ 
Glass, Annie Mae _ 
Gorham, Marion _ _ 

Hardin, Ruth 

Harrison, Thelma _ 
Haygood, Vera _ _ _ 
Hearn, .Mildred _ _ 
Henry, Frances _ _ 
Hill, Mary Catherine 



Culpepper, Florence Meriwether Hodges, Bessie 



Meriwether 
_ _ Clarke 
_ _ Rabun 
_ _ Clarke 
_ _ Clarke 
_ _ Walton 
_ _ Wilkes 
_ _ Monroe 

Clay 

_ _ Lamar 

_ _ Evans 

_ _ Walker 

_ _ Sumter 

Screven 



68 



STATE NORMAL SCHOOL 



Hurst, Jennie Belle _ Seminole 
Jackson, Ollilu _____ Butts 
Joiner, Jewel Mae _ _ _ _ Dooly 
Jones, Nora ______ Jasper 

Keese, Leola Randolph 

Kilpatrick, Annie Mae _ Morgan 
Lane, Louise ______ Jasper 

Lee, Sara _ _ _ _ Meriwether 

Laurence, Frances _ _ _ Upson 
McKinnon, Susie _ _ _ _ Clay 

Mable, Sue _______ Cobb 

Maples, Rebecca Mitchell 

Martin, Cornelia _ _ _ _ Wilkes 

Miller, Edith _ _ Terrell 

Miller, Elizabeth Terrell 

Nix, Beatrice ______ Bibb 

Page, Frances Clyde _ _ _ Bibb 



Parker, Eloise _ _ _ _ Screven 
Porterfield, Ollie Mae _ _ Clarke 
Read, Lucia _____ Oconee 

Rish, Cecelia _ _ Calhoun 

Sams, Caroline _ _ _ _ Newton 
Sanders, Mabel _ _ _ _ Calhoun 
Sims, Annie ______ Clarke 

Stephens, Eugenia Banks 

Thompson, Mattie Bell _ Harris 
Turner, Ruth _ _ _ Meriwether 
Waits, Ilah ______ Jasper 

Walker, Clara Maude _ Screven 

Wallis, Ruth _ Forsyth 

Walters, Josephine Sumter 

Wasdin, Pauline _ _ _ Screven 

Wilkes, Mainee Louise Dooly 

Womble, Lucile _ _ Dougherty 



Freshman 



Bell, Lucile _____ Stephens 

Brackett, Delia Lee _ _ Clarke 
Castlen, Ida ______ Monroe 

Christian, Iris _____ Clarke 

Curston, Marion _ _ _ _ Dade 

Dellingar, Oliu _ _ _ _ Oconee 

Drake, Sara ______ Clarke 

Dye, Nona Aiken, S. C. 

Harris, Eleanor ______ 

_ _ _ _ St. Augustine, Fla. 

Huff, Alberta _____ Clarke 

Jones, Nelle _____ Madison 

King, Mary ______ Putnam 

Special and Ir 

Bell, Zealure Mae Clarke 

Boatner, Louise _ _ _ _ Clarke 
Carmichael, Mary Florence _ 

Morgan 

Cash, Elizabeth _ _ _ Gwinnett 
Christain, Curtis _ _ _ _ Clarke 
Flannigan, Jean _ _ .. _ Clarke 
Florence, Mrs. Marie _ _ Clarke 
Gerken, Addie _ _ _ Chatham 
Hodges, Lucile _____ Clay 



Mashbourn, Laurence Clarke 

Medlock, Lurline _ _ _ Dekalb 

Moody, Emily Whitfield 

Moore, Kathryne Whitfield 

Moss, Caleria Franklin 

Millikin, Mildred Clarke 

Pope, Ava _______ Clarke 

Robinson, Frances _ _ DeKalb 
Shivers, Evelyn _ _ _ Randolph 
Stovall, Mary Frances _ Morgan 
Strickland, Vivian _ _ _ Clarke 
Woodham, Martha Pulaski 



regular Students 

Lanneau, Grace _ 
McWhirter, Callie 
Morgan, Eunice _ 
Roberts, Kathryn 
Sanders, Nellie _ . 
Shelton, Eleanor _ 
Strickland, Ethel . 
Thompson, Louise 
Wehunt, Clyde _ . 
Wehunt, Meerenie 



_ _ Chatham 
_ _ _ Clarke 
_ _ _ Clarke 
_ _ _ Terrell 
. _ _ Calhoun 
Buffalo, S. C. 

Seminole 

_ _ _ Screven 

Clarke 

_ _ _ Clarke 



STATE NORMAL SCHOOL 



69 



TRAINING SCHOOL ROLL 



First Grade 



Allen, Alban 
Barber, Henry 
Booth, Florence 
Broyles, Bertha 
Bulloch, Felton 
Cagle, Harold 
Callaway, Lucy 
Cooksey, Wilbur 
Couch, Calvin 
Couch, Earnest 
Davie, Marion 
Davis, Harry 
Delaney, Virginia 
Doster, Frances 
Drake, Martha 
Fields, Eugene 
Hayes, Walter 
Hill, Reba 
Huff, Thomas 



Aaron, Charles 
Booth, Frances 
Brackett, Carnell 
Bulloch, Millie 
Cagle, Mildred 
Daniel, Gunter 
Christain, Felton 
Dunaway, Bertha 
Hardy, Harold 
Huntington, Hazel 

Anderson, Catherine 
Barber, Mary Lou 
Barber, Corinne 
Barber, Otho 
Bishop, Elmer 
Booth, Russell 
Bulloch, Pansy 
Bryan, Lona May 
Camp, T. C. 



Jarrett, J. D. 
King, Alice 
Lawrence, Allen T. 
Mize, Louise 
McClure, Mary F. 
McLeroy, Henry 
Norton, Carolyn 
Poss, Wilsie 
Papa, Tresa 
Sanders, Marie 
Simms, Rosa 
Seagraves, Robert 
Sell, Edward 
Truett, Margarett 
Tyson, Willa May 
Upchurch, Herman 
Winn, David 
Yearwood, Nell 



Second Grade 



Jarrett, Ostell 
Jarrett, Odell 
Jarrett, Robins 
Matthews, Dwight 
Oldham, Doris 
Oldham, Frances 
Pridgeon, Lucy 
Reed, Clayton 
Warwick, Ila May 
Wortham, Rufus 



Third Grade 



Carlisle, Joe 
Carlisle, Earnest 
Carter, Joseph 
Doster, Virginia 
Echols, J. B. 
Edison, Florie 
Fulcher, Irma 
Harlow, Willie Lou 
Marabl.'. Dorothy 



70 



STATE NORMAL SCHOOL 



Martin, Hermine 
Mize, Mamie 
McClure, Janette 
Papa, Mary 
Patten, Carol 
Petty, Marion 



Addison, Joseph 
Bulloch, Bertha 
Christian, Oda Lee 
Collins, Walter 
Couch, Florine 
Drake, Harold 
Edwards, Charles 
Pulcher, Harold 
Hill, Ralph 
Kenney, Helen 
Nicholson, Bertie 
Petty, Frank 



Aycock, Lucile 
Barber, Clarence 
Bulloch, Wyatt 
Daniel, Randolph 
Doster, Louis 
Fields, Pauline 
Kenney, Bertha May 
Lindsay, Mary F. 
Matthews, Henry 
McCaskell, Eldred 
Mitchell, Grace 



Anderson, J. T. 
Bevers, Estelle 
Bowden, Tom 
Brackett, Donald 
Carter, Dorsey 
Chappell, Nell 
Conyers, Ab 
Couch, Kathleen 
Davis, Voncile 
Doster, Curtis 



Shetterley, Fay 
Tyson, Thetus 
Whitehead, Carlton 
Whitehead, Winston 
Winn, Louise 

Fourth Grade 

Pledger, Frank 
Pollard, Ida 
Poss, Hazel 
Prater, William 
Reynolds, Sara 
Saye, Evelyn 
Summerlin, Raymond 
Truett, Evelyn 
Truett, George 
Tyson, Eunice 
Wehunt, Quillian 
Wilson, Harry 



Fifth Grade 



Mize, Addie Sue 
Oldham, Grace 
Oldham, Ruth 
Pridgeon, Mary 
Sanders, Mardell 
Scoggins, James 
Sorrough, Roselyn 
Veal, Odessa 
Whitehead, Eugenia 
Winn, Vivian 
Wortham, Thurmon 



Sixtb Grade 



Dunaway, Alfred 
Fowler, Frances 
Hubert, Douglas 
Huff, Claude 
Joiner, Rosena 
Jones, Vesta 
Kenney, Martha 
Lawrence, Harvey 
Marable, Mallis 
Mize, Wayne 



STATE NORMAL SCHOOL 



Papa, Florice 
Papa, Mildred 
Pound, Stokely 
Ritchie, H. B. 
Slaughter, Nat 



Spratlin, Susie M. 
Upchurch, Mary D. 
Wages, David 
Waters, Frank 



JUNIOR HIGH SCHOOL 



s 



Aaron, Clarence 
Adams, H. T. 
Anderson, Ida Belle 
Anderson, Lois 
Christian, Lawrence 
Davis, Blanche 
Elder, Charles 
Fowler, J. B. 
Henry, Joel 
Huff, Mozelle 
Jarrett, Frances 
Jennings, Walter 

Aycock, Mary 
Aycock, Lessie 
Bennett, Leonora 
Bray, Agnes 
Cagle, Lois 
Carter, Fred 
Conway, Leo 
Copeland, Iva J. 
Crawford, Quilla 
Daniel, Lucile 



Calhoun, Carolyn 
Crawford, Lucy Lee 
Dickerson, Nezzie 
Fisher, Louise 
Gaines, Helen 



Burns, Edna 
Byrd, Stanley 
Calbord, Herchel 



Seventh Grade 

Johnson, Annie Lene 
Nicholson, Louise 
Lindsay, J. B. 
Mitchell, Daisy 
Oldham, Marvin 
Oldham, Raymond 
Peek, Amelia 
Reynolds, Robert 
VanStraaten, Eugene 
Winn, Elizabeth 
Whitehead, James 
Whitehead, Paul 

Eighth Grade 

Eidson, Nellie M. 
Fleming, Felton 
Hale, Eddie 
Hughes, C. D. 
Joiner, Mollie 
Lowe, Effie 
Pope, Mary Jim 
Shetterley, Ruby 
Wehunt, Winnie Lcc 
Walker, J. Y. 

Ninth Grade 

Herbert, Sadie 
Jarrett, Lucile 
Langston, Marguerite 
Logan, Maggie 
Norris, George 

RURAL SCHOOL 
First Grade 

Dellinger, Marshall 
Fowler, Pinkie 
Frix, Annie Laura 



72 



STATE NORMAL SCHOOL 



Lester, Rufus 
Miller, Alfonsa 
Prather, Troy 
Rice, Hope 

Anchors, Jack 
Cleveland, Grover 
Colley, Richard 
Doster, Walter L, 
Eunn, Edward 
Epps, Crawford 
Frix, D. S. 
Graham, Howard 
Hamilton, Billie 
Kenney, Bobbie 
Lester, John Willie 
Lester, Leon 

Burns, Telford 
Brackett, Cornell 
Colvard, Clayton 
Dellinger, Garnett 
Epps, Howard 
Epps, Mattie Lou 

Dellinger, Bethie 
. Driskell, Doyce 
Graham, James 
Kenney, Wilson 
Lester, Oscar 

Burns, Elmer 
Dellinger, Dessie 
Doster, Grace 
Driskell, Velma 
Fowler, Alice Nelle 
Kenney, Hazel 

Johnson, Andrew 
Nelson, Ruby 

Driskell, Dennis 
Rice, Isaac 
Summary by grades: 
0; Fifth, 12; Sixth, 3 



Rumsey, Willie 
Strickland, Grover 
Witcher, Bennie 

Second Grade 

Maynard, Carlton 
Miller, Lillie 
Morrora, Elsie 
Nelson, Alice 
Prather, Odell 
Rumsey, Una 
Sorrough, Billie 
Strickland, Guy 
Threlkeld, Clayton 
Threlkeld, J. B. 
Witcher, Lula Belle 

Third Grade 

Fowler, Louise 
Johnson, Jessie 
Tester, Arthur 
Threlkeld, Frank 
Wallace, Evelyn 

Fourth Grade 

Lester, Sallie Lou 
Nelson, Mary 
Rumsey, Ina 
Witcher, Eula Mae 



Fifth Grade 



Sixth Grade 



Kenney, Susie 
Lester, Ellie 
Lester, Theodore 
Maynard, Nellie Mae 
Payne, Donold 
Rumsey, Ruby 

Wallace, Thomas 





Seventh Grade 

Sorrells, Annie Mae 

First, 13; Second, 23; Third, 11; Four 
Seventh, 3. Total, 74. 



th, 




VN 




Ml -^ 







CALENDAR, 1924-25 



1924 

Sept. 2nd, Tuesday — School Dormitories open. 
Sept. 2nd, Tuesday — Classification of Students.. 
Sept. 3rd, Wednesday— Classification of Students. 
Sept. 4th, Thursday — Fall Term begins. 
Dec. 18th — Christmas Holidays begin. 

(Recitations end Wednesday, December 17th). 

1925 

Jan. 6th, Tuesday — Re-opening of School. 

Apr. 17th, Thursday — Founders Day. 

May 24th, Sunday — Sommencement Sermon, at 11:00 A. M. 

May 25th, Monday — Annual Concert, at 8:00 P. M. 

May 26th, Tuesday — Annual Meeting of Board of Trustees, 10 A. M. 

May 27th, Wednesday — Graduating Exercises, 8:00 P. M. 



New students may enter at any time during the year, but it is 
best for them to enter September 2nd or January 6th. 



BOARD OF TRUSTEES AND OFFICERS 



B. S. MILLER, Columbus, Ga President 

Members ex-officio 

Governor Clifford M. Walker Atlanta, Ga. 

State Superintendent of Schools, N. H. Ballard Atlanta, Ga. 

Chancellor, University of Georgia, David C. Barrow Athens, Ga. 

Members-at-Large 

Mrs. W. W. Stark Commerce, Ga. 

Mrs. J. E. Hayes Montezuma, Ga. 

Members City of Athens 

A. H. Davison Athens, Ga. 

Mrs. Julia Ashton White Athens, Ga. 

Members Representing Trustees of University of Georgia 

Judge Loyd Cleveland Griffin, Ga. 

H. J. Rowe Athens, Ga. 

Howell Erwin Athens, Ga. 

Members Representing Congressional Districts 

First District, Joseph W. Smith Reidsville, Ga. 

Second District, W. V. Custer Bainbridge, Ga. 

Third District, J. M. Collum Americus, Ga. 

Fourth District, B. S. Miller Columbus, Ga. 

Fifth District, Mrs. Howard McCall Atlanta, Ga. 

Sixth District, Frank F. Jones Macon, Ga. 

Seventh District, Mrs. Annie Freeman Johnson Rome, Ga. 

Eighth District, S. B. Yow Lavonia, Ga. 

Ninth District, L. M. Brand Lawrenceville, Ga. 

Tenth District, Mrs. Ira E. Farmer Thomson, Ga. 

Eleventh District, Jerome Crawley Waycross, Ga. 

Twelfth District, Judge W. W. Larsen Dublin, Ga. 

Secretary ami Treasurer 

G. A. Mell Athens, Ga. 



COMMITTEES 



Salaries — Rowe, Barrow, Collum, Brand, Custer, MoCall, Johnson 
Hayes. 

Prudential — Ballard, Barrow, Rowe, Davison, White. 

Legislative — Cleveland, Custer, Stark, Hayes, McCall, Crawley. 

Uniform — Brand, Yow, McCall. 

Teachers and Course of Study — Ballard, Yow, Crawley, Smith, 
Jones, Collum, White, Stark, Hayes. 

Finance — Brand, Davison, Cleveland, Custer, Farmer, Johnson. 

Laws and Regulation — Cleveland, Rowe, Larsen, Jones, Farmer, 
Smith. 

Buildings and Grounds — Barrow, Yow, Smith, Rowe, Collum, White, 
Larsen, Stark. 



STATE NORMAL SCHOOL 

OFFICERS AND FACULTY 



DAVID C. BARROW, LL.D Chancellor Ex-Officio 

Chancellor of the University of Georgia. 

JERE M. POUND, A.B., LL.D President 

A. RHODES Business Manager 

H. B. RITCHIE Dean 

Mrs. H. C. DOOLITTLE Registrar 

MISS EMMIE JONES Bookkeeper 

G. A. MELL Secretary and Treasurer 



MISS ELEANOR ADAMS, 

Critic Teacher. 

MRS. GERTRUDE A. ALEXANDER, A.M., 

Expression; Assistant in English. 

MISS FRANCES RANDOLPH ARCHER, 

Librarian. 

MRS. J. W. BAILEY 

Assistant in Piano Department. 

MISS BESS M. BAIRD, 

Household Arts. 

MISS/ ESTHER BENSON, 

Public School Music. 

MRS. G. A. BROADHURST, 

Critic Teacher. 
PETER F. BROWN, A.M., 

English. 

MISS MaNITA BULLOCH, 

Assistant, Oratory. 

MISS IRIS CALLAWAY, B.S., 

Assistant in Department of Mathematics 

MRS. LENA CHANDLER 

Housekeeper. 

MISS LUCILE CHARLTON, 

Critic Teacher. 

MISS CARRIE CLAY, 

Assistant, English Department. 

MISS NELLIE COLBERT, 

Matron, Gilmer Hall. 

MRS. A. J. CONYERS, 

Trained Nurse. 



STATE NORMAL SCHOOL 

W. L. COOKSEY, 

Farm Superintendent. 

MISS KATIE DOWNS, 

Critic Teacher. 

WILLIAM T. DUMAS, A.M., 

Mathematics. 
DAVID L. EARNEST, A.M., 

Science. 

MRS. AGNES EBERHARDT, 

Piano. 

MISS LAURA ELDER, 

Teacher of Rural School. 

MISS LUCY GRIFFITH, 

Assistant Librarian and Stenographer. 

MISS EDITH GUILL, 

Assistant in Department of Physical Education. 

MISS IRMA HICKS, 

Assistant in Department of Household Arts. 

MISS KATE HICKS, 

Principal Elementary School. 

MISS ROBERTA HODGSON, A.M., 

History. 

SCOTT HOLLAND, 

Assistant, Romance Languages. 

MISS ANNIE MAE HOLLIDAY, 

Assistant in Department of Manual Arts. 

MISS RUTH KLEIST, 

Assistant in Household Arts Department. 

MRS. MAGGIE LAMBDIN, 

Matron, Bradwell Hall. 

MISS ANNIE LINTON, 

Manual Arts. 

JOSEPH LUSTRAT, LL.D., Officer d'Academie, 

Romance Languages. 

MISS ANNIE V, MASSEY, 

Critic Teacher. 

MISS LOUISE McCAMMON, 

Assistant in Science Department. 

MISS MOINA MICHAEL, 

Y. W. C. A. Secretary; Matron, Winnie Davis Hall. 

MRS. FRANK OSTERMANN, 

Critic Teacher. 



8 STATE NORMAL SCHOOL 

H. B. RITCHIE, A.M., 

Education. 

E. S. SELL, M.S.Agr., 

Agriculture and Rural Social Science. 

J. H. SIMS, 

Engineer. 

MISS INEZ SPARKS, 

Critic Teacher. 

MISS HELEN L. SPROUT, 

Latin and Greek. 

Director of Correspondence Course. 

MISS LURA B. STRONG, 

Physical Education. 

J. R. THAXTON, 

Assistant, Romance Languages. 

MISS LILLIE THOMPSON, 

Assistant in Department of Household Arts. 

MISS CAROLYN VANCE, B.L.I. , 

Oratory. 

MISS ALICE WALKER, 

Critic Teacher. 

MISS SARAH WEBB, Ph.B., 

Assistant in Department of Education. 

MISS ESTHER WOLLA, 

Assistant in Household Arts Department. 

MISS MARY M. WOODS, L.B., 

Assistant in Department of Agriculture and Rural Social Science. 

MISS MAY ZEIGLER, A.M., 

Assistant in Department of Education. 



STATE NORMAL SCHOOL 



FACULTY COMMITTEES, 1924-25 

Library: Archer, Hicks, Sprout, Brown, Hodgson, Zeigler. 

Calendar and Entertainments: Linton, Eberhardt, Michael, Rhodes, 
Callaway, Clay. 

Schedule: Alexander, Callaway, Ritchie, Sell, Dumas. 

Promotion and Publicity: Sell, Earnest, Holliday. 

Curriculum: Brown, Ritchie, Alexander, Sell, Linton, Baird, Sprout, 
Dumas, Strong. 

Publication: Sell, Brown, Holliday. 

School Organizations: Ritchie, Strong, Sell, Earnest, Michael, Col- 
bert. 

Classification: Dumas, Brown, Ritchie, Sell, Alexander, Callaway, 
Webb. 

Alumi-ae: Hicks, Callaway, Clay, Guill, Webb, Walker, Downs, 
Adams. 

Welfare: Rhodes, Conyers, Strong, Baird, and Matrons. 

Grounds and Buildings: Rhodes, Sell, Hicks, Lambdin, Colbert. 

Employment: Earnest, Hicks, Ritchie, Baird. 

Records: Dumas, Webb, Linton, Holliday, Sprout. Guill, Wolla, 
Kleist. 

Uniform: Baird, Thompson, Archer, Strong. 

Absence: Earnest, Webb, Dumas. 



10 STATE NORMAL SCHOOL 

HISTORICAL 



The Trustees of the University of Georgia donated to the State 
the building known as Rock College and from six to ten acres of 
land contiguous thereto, together with the late George R. Gilmer 
fund. Under the condition of Governor Gilmer's will, this sum 
must be used to train teachers in the elementary branches of an 
English education only. The condition attached to these gifts of 
the Trustees of the University was that the State should establish 
at Rock College a Normal School for the education and training of 
teachers for the rural schools. 

An Act was passed by the Legislature of Georgia in 1891: 

"To establish, organize and maintain a State Normal School as a 
branch to the University, to appropriate money for the same, and 
for other purposes." This Act received the approval of the Gov- 
ernor, October 21, 1891. By the provision of this Act, the State 
received from the Trustees of the University, as a donation for the 
purpose of establishing a Normal School, the building known as 
Rock College and a tract of land of not less than six nor more 
than ten acres upon which the college building stood, lying just 
outside the limits of the City of Athens, Ga. The Act also pro- 
vided for a Normal School Commission, consisting of the State 
School Commissioner, who should be the Chairman, the Chancellor 
of the University, and "three citizens of Georgia, experienced in 
teaching, to be appointed by the Governor." 

It is interesting to note that the water used by the School came 
from a well, and the water was declared to be pure and wholesome 
and was so cold that no ice was needed. 

The lower floor of Rock College was divided into lecture rooms, 
restaurant, hall and assembly rooms. The second and third floors 
were used as a dormitory. These rooms were furnished by the 
appropriation of $500.00 from the City Council of Athens in 1892, 
with wire cots, tables, chairs, buckets and other necessary articles 
of furniture. 

The Act creating the State Normal School was passed in 1891, 
and short sessions of the school were held during the summer 
months of 1892, 1893 and 1894. The Commission had at its com- 
mand only the interest of the Gilmer fund which was transferred 
for safe keeping to the Trustees of the University by the Trustees 
of the estate of the late George R. Gilmer. The interest on this 
fund amounted to $1,050.00 a year, from which a commission of 
$50.00 a year was deducted for the expenses of administration. In 
1892 there were added to this, the Peabocly Institute fund of 






STATE NORMAL SCHOOL 11 

$800.00, and the County Institute fund of five counties, which met 
at Rock College for one week, and amounted to $125.00. There- 
fore, the School was carried on in 1893 with the sum of $1,923.00. 

The session of 1892 began July 11th, and lasted seven weeks. 
Exclusive of the attendance during the County Institute week, the 
roll of students numbered 112, representing thirty-two counties. 

So far as the resources of the college for the year 189 3 are con- 
cerned, they are best explained by an extract from the minutes of 
the Commission at their meeting in Atlanta, April 1, 1893: 

"The Chairman made a statement of the efforts that had been 
made to induce the Legislature to appropriate a sum of money for 
the permanent establishment of a State Normal School, and stated 
that the Legislature had failed to make an appropriation for the 
purpose named. Dr. William E. Boggs then stated that the net 
interest on the Gilmer fund, amounting to $1,000.00, would be 
available on the first day of July. He said, also that the people of 
Athens were desirous of having the Normal School operated during 
the coming summer, 1893, and that the grand jury of Clarke county 
had, at his request, made an appropriation of $400 for the pur- 
pose. The citizens of Athens had also made up a private subscrip- 
tion of $537 to be added to the fund. These resources, added to- 
gether, made a total of $1,937 for the summer session of 1893." 

The private subscriptions from the citizens of Athens were se- 
cured by Dr. Edwin D. Newton and Mr. T. W. Reed. This must 
have been a tedious undertaking, for many of the subscriptions 
only amounted to fifty cents. 

The session of 1893 began July 5th, and lasted six weeks. There 
were enrolled 116 students from thirty-five counties. These pupils 
were not all present at the same time. Some came for a week, 
others for two weeks, others for a month, while many remained dur- 
ing the entire -session. 

The nature of the work done during the sessions of 1892 and 
1893, the enthusiasm of the students, the apparent demand for an 
enlarged and well-equipped Normal School, induced the Normal 
School Commission to appeal to the Legislature of 1893 for an 
appropriation to remodel, equip, and operate the State Normal 
School. The Legislature, however, ^ took no action in the matter, 
and the Normal School Commission was again left with limited 
means to carry out the provisions of the Act creating the School. 

A meeting of the State Normal School Commission was held in 
Atlanta to take into consideration the work of the School for the 
summer of 18') 1. 

The Chairman of the Commission Btated that the Legislature had 
made no appropriation for the support of the School during the 



12 STATE NORMAL SCHOOL 

year of 1894, and that the only money available was the interest on 
the George R. Gilmer fund. 

After some discussion, the Commission decided to open the col- 
lege for a month during the summer of 1894, and the following 
resolution was passed: 

"Resolved, That the State Normal School at Rock College be 
opened for one month during the summer of 1894, beginning from 
the 17th day of July, and that the interest on the Gilmer fund, 
accruing July 1st, be used for defraying the expenses of the ses- 
sion." 

Another resolution was also passed and was as follows: 

"Resolved, That the Normal School Commission, recognizing the 
generosity of the grand jury of Clarke county, the City Council and 
citizens of Athens in the aid they have hitherto given the Normal 
School, and fully grateful for their past favors, yet in view of the 
urgent necessities of the School, respectfully suggest to the grand 
jury that an appropriation for the year 1894 would greatly aid in 
continuing the prosperity and insuring the success of the Normal 
School." 

"Resolved, That Dr. William E. Boggs, Professor David Barrow, 
Jr., be requested to present this resolution to the next session of 
the grand jury." 

The grand jury received the resolutions, and in their present- 
ments made an appropriation of $750.00 to the State Normal 
School, provided a session of eight weeks was held. This provision 
was cheerfully agreed to by the Commission, and the day of open- 
ing of the Normal School for 1894 was changed from July 17th, 
to July 5th. 

The State Normal School enrolled 175 students during the sum- 
mer of 1894. Fifty-one counties were represented in this student 
body. 

The success of the summer session under the direction of Mr. 
Lawton B. Evans made a permanent Normal School a necessity and 
the Legislature of 1894 gave financial assistance to the School and 
fixed the annual appropriation at ten thousand dollars. 

It was peculiarly fitting that Captain S. D. Bradwell was chosen 
as the first president of the State Normal School, after it was per- 
manently established. Probably no man had done more for the 
teachers of the State, and no one understood their needs better, 
or sympathized with them in their work more. He was possessed 
with a remarkable memory for names and faces, and while State 
School Commissioner, he probably knew more men in Georgia than 
any other man. This fact was an invaluable aid to Captain Bradwell 
in getting the School established. 



STATE NORMAL SCHOOL 13 

The school was opened April 17, 1895. The 17th of April was 
observed as Founder's Day for many years in the school and appro- 
priate exercises were conducted. Miss Mamie Mathews of Ogle- 
thorpe county was the first student to register in the school. The 
attendance during the spring was very small, but the summer 
months brought a much large enrollment. 

Captain S. D. Bradwell tendered his resignation as President of 
the School at a meeting of the Commission held March 7, 1901. 
Mr. E. C. Branson was elected to succeed Captain Bradwell. Cap- 
tain Bradwell had been President since the permanent organization 
of this institution in 1895, during the short period of six years, 
under his administration the School was organized and had grown 
to such an extent that the annual enrollment was well above six 
hundred. 

In 1912 President E. C. Branson resigned to accept the head of 
the department of Rural Economics and Sociology, and Mr. Jere 
M. Pound was elected President. 

1. Gilmer Hall. 

This building was erected in 1860 by the University of Georgia 
and was donated to the State Normal School in 1891. At first the 
Normal School was completely housed in this one building but it is 
now used exclusively as a dormitory. It was named for Governor 
Gilmer, as the income from a fund left by his will was used to help 
found the State Normal School. 

2. Bradwell Hall. 

In 1896 this building was completed as a two-story structure and 
the third floor was added in the following year, and was made pos- 
sible through subscriptions by the teachers in the school. At first, 
part of the lower floor was used as a dining hall and the other part 
of the building was used as a dormitory for young men. It is used 
entirely now as a girls' dormitory- It was named for the first presi- 
dent of the school. 

3. Old Auditorium. 

In 1898 from appropriations of that year, the commission au- 
thorized the erection of this building. It is two stories high, with 
an auditorium on the first floor and class-rooms above. 

4. Winnie Davis Memorial Hall. 

The Daughters of the Confederacy planned this building to per- 
petuate the memory of Winnie Davis, daughter of Jefferson Davis, 
and it was through their efforts that this hall was built. It was 
completed in 1902 and is used as a dormitory. Various Chapters 



14 STATE NORMAL SCHOOL 

of the Daughters of the Confederacy maintain rooms in the build- 
ing and make appointments of the students to occupy the rooms. 
Rooms are secured in the building by applying to Chapters who 
have furnished the different rooms. 

5. Muscogee Elementary Training School. 

George Foster Peabody gave the money to build and equip this 
building and it was completed in 1902. A well organized school of 
seven grades is carried on in this building to give the Senior class 
practice in teaching before they are allowed to graduate. The 
building was so named because Muscogee is Mr. Peabody's native 
county. 

6. Smith Building. 

This building was completed in 1906. It was made possible 
through gifts by James M. Smith, George Foster Peabody, the 
State, Faculty, and a number of small contributors. It contains 
class-rooms and the administrative offices, and was named for the 
late James M. Smith. 

7. Dining Hall. 

The dining hall was also completed in 1906. The first floor of 
this building is used as a dining hall while the second floor is 
known as Senior Hall and is used as a dormitory. 

8. Carnegie Library. 

This building was given by Andrew Carnegie to the State Nor- 
mal School and is of course used as a library. It contains about 
ten thousanad volumes, and was erected in 1910. 

9. The Rural School. 

This is a modern one-room rural school building on the campus 
to give the Seniors practice in teaching in a country school. The 
building is well lighted and heated and complete in every detail. 
The children come from the country, thus making it a rural school 
from every point of view. It was built in 1911. 

10. Dairy Barn. 

This structure is of concrete, modern and sanitary in every way, 
with a large silo made at one end. It was built in 1914 and is 
large enough to accommodate seventy cows. The school farm is 
located on the Oconee river three miles from town. This farm 
was purchased, equipped, and is operated without a cent from the 
State. 



STATE NORMAL SCHOOL 15 

11. Infirmary. 

The infirmary was built in 1916 as a result of the efforts of the 
Elijah Clarke Chapter of the Daughters of the American Revolu- 
tion, although the funds were furnished by this Chapter in co- 
operation with the General Assembly. 

12. Practice Home. 

This building was used as an infirmary until the new one was 
built in 1916. It was converted into the practice home where the 
students get practice in home making, thus putting into practice 
things studied in the class-room. 

13. Miller Hall. 

With an appropriation from the State this dormitory was com- 
pleted in 1917. This is a two-story structure and is modern in 
every respect. It is named in honor of Mr. B. S. Miller, President 
of the Board of Trustees. 

14. Pound Auditorium. 

This building was also finished in 1917, as an appropriation 
amounting to $100,000 from the State was sufficient to build Mil- 
ler Hall and the Pound Auditorium. It has an auditorium that 
will seat 2,500 people; as well as a number of class-rooms and 
offices. This auditorium is named for the President of the School. 



GENERAL CONDITIONS OF ADMISSION 

The purpose of this school is to "educate and train teachers for 
the common schools of Georgia." The terms of admission are as 
follows: 

First: The applicant must be sufficiently mature and sufficiently 
well prepared to undertake the work of the school successfully. All 
students, when admitted are considered upon probation at all times; 
and, when unwilling or unable to do the work required, they will 
be privately counseled to withdraw. 

Second: This institution is a vocational school, not a reforma- 
tory. We have no punishments. All trifling with rules and regu- 
lations or careless, indifferent, and improper conduct will subject 
the offender to the necessity of withdrawing. Only students with 
a serious purpose are desired; and only such will be permitted to 
remain. Students in training are supposed to be mature enough 
to be responsible and our dealings are with them, not with their 
parents. 

Third: Good Moral Character. Every student will be required to 



16 STATE NORMAL SCHOOL 

hand to the President a letter of recommendation from some re- 
sponsible party in the home neighborhood. 

Fourth: Good Health. This school is delightfully situated in the 
Piedmont Hills. The conditions of health here cannot be sur- 
passed. But in order to protect our students as carefully as pos- 
sible we have always on duty nurses of the very highest training, 
whose business will be to constantly inspect the dormitories and 
to examine all the students personally for all evidences of sickness 
and ill health. 

Fifth: Applicants for admission to the school must bring a letter 
from the home physician certifying that the applicant is in sound 
health and has not been exposed to any contagious disease within 
the previous thirty days. See blank for this purpose, next to last 
page. This letter must be presented upon arrival. 

Sixth: Successful vaccination is also another absolutely neces- 
sary condition of entrance. All students upon arrival will have 
their arms examined by a physician; and if they do not have a 
satisfactory scar, they must be vaccinated at once before they can 
be admitted to the school. In all cases it is better for applicants 
to be vaccinated before coming here, provided it can be done with 
fresh, pure vaccine points. 

These last two conditions are so imperative, and will be adhered 
to so rigidly, that the applicant who neglects them will be neces- 
sarily subjected to great trouble in entering the school. Plainly 
and emphatically, these things must not be neglected by any appli- 
cant. 

Registering. 

Upon reaching the school, the student should go at once to the 
office of the Registrar and fill out a registration blank properly. 
This blank is then taken to the Dormitory Manager's office where 
a Dormitory Room Ticket will be obtained. All moneys and fees 
should at once be paid at this office and receipts secured for same. 

The Classification Committee will meet the students in various 
class-rooms for all assignments. A directory of where these com- 
mittees may be! found will be posted in conspicuous places in the 
corridors of the academic buildings. In order to be properly classi- 
fied at once, the student should bring letter of introduction, health 
certificate, and all reports from former schools and teachers. 

Boarding Department. 

All dormitories are steam-heated, with toilet rooms and bath 
on every floor abundantly supplied with hot and cold water. They 
are comfortable, pleasant, and healthful homes for the students. 



STATE NORMAL SCHOOL 17 

All of our dormitories are the equal of the best dormitories in all 
matters of convenience and comfort. Students in each dormitory 
are under the care of a resident matron, who looks after their 
needs and comforts. The dining hall is well equipped. 

Board in the dormitories includes room, table fare, heat, lights, 
and attendants for the rougher work. 

Each student will pay for, and look after her own laundering, 
with the assistance of the matron in charge. 

Each student must bring a pillow, pillow-cases, bed-clothes (in- 
cluding at least one white spread), towels, hair-brush and comb, 
and other personal toilet articles; also a bath-robe, bed-room slip- 
pers, overshoes, wrap and umbrella. 

Each student should bring also one cup and saucer, one dinner 
plate, one knife, fork and teaspoon, for personal use in the dormi- 
tories, when such things are necessary- It is against the rules 
for any student to carry out or borrow dishes and silver from the 
dining-room. 

Male students do not room in the dormitories. Rooms are rented 
for them near the campus and paid for by the school. Such stu- 
dents pay the same rate for board as outlined in the catalogue, 
furnishing bedding, etc., just as the girls do. 

Parents and friends visiting students cannot be accommodated 
in the dormitories, as there is no room for them. They can secure 
board in the city. 

Issignment of Rooms. 

Rooms are not assigned until the opening of school in the fall. 
This work cannot be done during the summer, except the rooms in 
the Winnie Davis Memorial Hall and these are secured through 
various Chapters of the Daughters of the Confederacy. Students 
that arrive on the first day of the opening of school have a better 
chance of securing rooms where they want them. 

Expenses. 

Terms for board (payable in advance, as indicated). 

Sept. 2nd, 1924 — First payment $ 37.50 

Nov. 4th, 1924 — Second Payment __1 37.50 

Jan. 27th, 1925 — Third Payment 37.50 

Mar. 24th, 1925 — Fourth Payment 37.50 

$1 r.o.oo 
Matriculation Fee (to be paid on entrance) 10.00 

Board for students who do not make the quartely payments as 



18 STATE NORMAL SCHOOL 

indicated above, will be at the rate of $4.50 per week, $1.00 per 
day. 

All students entering before September 15th, will be charged 
from date of opening (Sept. 2nd). Those entering on, and after 
Sept. 15th, will be charged from the date they enter school. 

No tuition is paid by Georgia students. Students from outside 
the State are required to pay $40.00 per year; $20.00 upon en- 
trance, and $20.00 at the beginning of the second semester. 

If advisable at any time to raise or lower the rates for board or 
matriculation fee, the right to do so is reserved. 

Money deposited on dormitory account will not be refunded. 

Money deposited on personal account may be withdrawn at any 
time. No part of the Matriculation fee will be refunded for any 
reason. 

Checks for board or tuition should not be made payable to the 
President, but to the student. 

Students must supply their own text-books. Books will be fur- 
nished at publishers' prices with cost of handling added. A second- 
hand book-store is also operated for the benefit of the students, 
who wish to buy or sell second-hand books. 

The school has a farm of 215 acres, which is well equipped to 
furnish supplies for the dining-room. 

Uniforms. 

To promote economy, simplicity, and good taste in dress, every 
young woman in the school, unless especially excused by the Presi- 
dent, is required to purchase and wear the uniform adopted by the 
school. Requests to be excused from wearing the uniform will not 
be considered except for very exceptional and unusual reasons. 

The uniform consists of the following articles: 

For church and street wear — a blue serge suit and cap. white 
waist, tan gloves, black shoes and hose. 

For class room wear — a blue serge suit skirt, uniform waist of 
white poplin, blue Windsor tie. 

For summer and evening wear — a white poplin wash skirt and 
white waist. 

The suit, cap, gloves, white skirts and tie may be ordered by mail 
before the student leaves home. Unless placed in advance, the order 
must be given immediately upon arrival at the school. The white 
waists for school, church, and evening wear must be made of the 
material and according to the patterns designated in the accom- 
panying leaflet giving detailed descriptions. 

The above requirements will be rigidly enforced. There must 
be no attempt at evasion or partial violation of these regulations. 



STATE NORMAL SCHOOL 19 

No other articles, however similar can be substituted for those 
specified. 

Students are expected to wear the uniform at all times both on 
and off the campus. They need not bring to the school dresses of 
other kinds, for it is desired that the uniform be worn on all oc- 
casions. This uniform is pronounced by all experts who have ex- 
amined it as the cheapest, neatest, completest and best uniform 
prescribed by any institution in the South. 

Uniforms must be kept in good condition. The enforcement of 
all regulations with regard to the uniform is within the authority 
of the matrons of the several dormitories. Students may be re- 
quired to buy new garments whenever in the judgment of the Pres- 
ident and the matrons it is deemed necessary. 

Students must not sell or give cast off uniform garments to per- 
sons living in the vicinity of Athens. 

The uniform skirt, cap, and white waist should be worn by for- 
mer students when returning to the school in September. All stu- 
dents must wear the uniform as a traveling dress at all other 
times. 

It is very desirable that uniforms be ordered before leaving home. 
A detailed description and order blank will be furnished upon re- 
quest made to the Registrar. 

JUNIOR HIGH SCHOOL 

The work of this school includes the seventh, eighth, and nintb 
grades, or the last year of the elementary school and the first two 
years of the high school. Only a small amount of election is per- 
mitted. The work is of a high standard. Strong student teachers 
are used to a limited extent in this school. It is also used for ob- 
servation. 

First Year 

English 5 

History 5 

Mathematics 5 

Science 5 

Domestic Science or Shop 1 5 

Physical Education 2 

Second Sear 

English 5 

History 5 

Mathematics 5 

Science 5 



20 STATE NORMAL SCHOOL 

Domestic Science or Latin or Shop 5 

Physical Education ! 2 

Third Year 

English 5 

History 5 

Mathematics 5 

Science 5 

Domestic Science or Latin or Shop 5 

Physical Education ! 2 

COURSE OF STUDY 

Applicants for any of the Academic or Industrial classes may 
offer certificates from accredited high schools for entrance into these 
classes. These certificates will be accepted as evidence of prepara- 
tion in those subjects which are certified to and the holder will be 
allowed to take up any advanced work based upon the certified sub- 
jects. Work in one study cannot be accepted as the equivalent of 
work in a different subject. 

All students from non-accredited schools must pass entrance ex- 
aminations on all subjects required for admission into the class 
applied for. Non-graduates of four-year accredited high schools 
must present fifteen units and stand examinations in at least four 
subjects, including English and Mathematics. 

Freshman Sophomore 

Hours Hours 

Education 1 1 Education 2___-_-_-l 

English 1 3 English 2 3 

Mathematics 1_______3 Mathematics 2 and 3 3 

History 1_________3 Latin 2 or Science 2 3 

Science 1 3 Chemistry l______--3 

Latin 1 or Household Arts or 

2 and Manual Arts 1 _ _ _ 3 Biology 
Physical Education _____ 2 Household Arts 7 and Manual 

Arts 2 and 3 - 3 

History _____.____.--3 
Physical Education _____ 2 

Total 18 Total IS 

The Freshman and Sophomore classes correspond to the third 
and fourth years of a four-year high school. The four classes for 
which the following courses are prescribed are strictly college 
classes. Advanced credit in these classes cannot be obtained by 
presenting high school certificates. 



STATE NORMAL SCHOOL 
Junior 



Academic 



L SCHOOL 



Industrial 



Hours 



21 



Hours 



Education 3 and 5 — 3 

Education 4 _ — _ _- 3 

English 3 3 

Public School Music (1%), 
Manual Arts (1V 2 ) 3 

Economics 1 (l 1 /,), Public 
Speaking 1 (1V 2 ) 3 

History 3 or Latin 3, 4; Math- 
ematics 4 or Physics; 
French 1 or Spanish 1 3 

Physical Education _____ 2 



Education 3 and 5 3 



Education 4 

English 3 

Household Arts 3 and 18 
Household Arts 8 and 11 

-Manual Arts 9 and 10 

or 
Household Arts 11 and 18 
Manual Arts 4 and 5 _ 



Y 9 



Physical Education _____ 2 



Total 20 

Senior 
Academic 



Total 20 



%>\im#<. 



Industrial 



Hours 
Education 7 and 8 _____ 3 

Practice Teaching and Con- 
ference __________ 3 

English ___________ 3 

Agriculture 1 ( 1 % ) , Public 

School Music (1%) 3 

Sociology {IVz) and Public 

Speaking (1%) 3 

History 4 or Latin 5 and 6, 
Mathematics 6 or Chemistry 
5, French 2 or Spanish 2 _ 3 
Physical Education _____ 2 



Total 



20 



Hours 
Practice Teaching and Con- 
ference __________ 3 

English 3 

Agriculture 2, 3______3 

Household Arts 4, 5 and 

15 3 | 

Household Arts 16 and | 

17 3 ] 9 

Household Arts 9 and 

12 3 J 

or 
Manual Arts 7 and 8 _ _ 3 1 
Manual Arts 11 and 12 _ 3 J 9 
Household Arts 16 and 17 3 J 
Physical Education _____ 2 

Total 20 



Junior Degree 



A.B. 



B.S. 



Hours 
_ _ 3 



Education 17 and 18 _ _ . 

English 5 _ 3 

Nine hours to be selected from 
the following groups, not 
more than two subjects 
from each group: 

Group 1: Latin 7 and 8, 
French 3, Spanish 3 _ _ _ 3 

Group 2: Mathematics 7, 
Science 4_________ 3 

Group 3: History 5, Econo- 
mics 3, Education _ 3 

Group 4: Agriculture 4 and 



Hours 

Education 17 and 18 - 3 

Household Chemistry _ _ _ _ 3 
Nine hours to be selected from 
the following groups, not 
more than two subjects 
from each group: 
Group 1: English. 5. Latin 7 
and 8, French 3, Spanish 

3 3 

Group 2: Mathematics 7, 
Science __________ 3 

Group 3: History 5, Econom- 
ics, Education _ — _ 3 



22 



STATE NORMAL SCHOOL 



5 - 3 

Group 5: Physical Education 
and Health, Public School 
Music, Public Speaking, 
Library Methods 3 

Total _________ _15 

Senior 

A.B. 

Hours 
Education 19 and 20 _ _ _ _ 3 

English 6 3 

Nine hours to be selected from 

the following groups, not 

more than two subjects 

from each group: 

Group 1: Latin 9 and 10, 

French 4, Spanish 4 _ _ — 3 
Group 2: Mathematics 8, 
Science _________3 

Group 3: History 6, Econom- 
ics 4, Education 21 3 

Group 4: Agriculture 6 and 
7, Household Arts 13 and 

14 3 

Group 5: Public School Music 3 



Group 4: Agriculture 4 and 
5, Household Arts 1, 6, 
Manual Arts 13 3 

Group 5: Public School Music, 
Physical Education and 
Health, Public Speaking, 
Library Methods _____ 3 

Total 15 

Degree 

B.S. 

Hours 

Education 19 and 20 3 

Bacteriology _______3 

Nine hours to be selected from 
the following groups, not 
more than two subjects 
from each group: 
Group 1: English 6, Latin 9 
and 10, French 4, Spanish 

4 3 

Group 2: Mathematics 8, 
Science 7________3 

Group 3: History 6, Econom- 
ics 4, Education 21 _ _ _ _ 3 

Group 4: Agriculture 6 and 7, 
Household Arts 10 or 13, 

14, Manual Arts 14 3 

Group 5: Public School Music 3 



AGRICULTURE AND RURAL SOCIAL SCIENCE 



1. Agriculture. 

This is a course in general agriculture designed to meet the 
needs of teachers who expect to teach the subject in the public 
schools. The topics studied will be those in a text on general 
agriculture but in addition field trips will be made and laboratory 
work will be required, as well as suggestions given for the best 
methods to be used in teaching this subject. 

Three hours per week, one semester. Senior Academic. Credit: 
1 Vz hours. 

2. Agronomy. 

This course will consist of the study of soils, the importance of 
the conservation of soils, the value of soil water as well as the 
means for the retention of this water. The value of manure and 
fertilizers, and a crop rotation as a factor in permanent agricul- 
ture will be stressed. A number of farm crops will be taken up in 
detail, with regard to varieties, means of improving and the insects 



STATE NORMAL SCHOOL 23 

and diseases of each crop will be studied. Laboratory work will 
be required. 

Three hours per week, one semester. Junior. Credit: 1V 2 hours. 

3. Animal Husbandry. 

The relation of farm animals to permanent agriculture, the prin- 
ciples involved in feeding, the importance of balanced rations to 
secure the proper developments of animals will be the foundation of 
this course. Later a detailed study will be made of the different 
breeds of cattle, swine, horses and poultry. One period per week 
will be devoted to laboratory work in the study of feeds, testing 
milk, working balanced rations and determining the profitableness 
of certain animals. 

Three hours per week, one semester. Junior. Credit: 1 y 2 hours. 

4. Poultry. 

The breeds of poultry, the care and management, the proper 
feeding and the insects and diseases of poultry will form the basis 
for this course. Consideration will be given to the location and 
construction of poultry houses. 

Three hours per week, one semester. Junior Degree Course. 
Credit: 1V 2 hours. 

5. Landscape Gardening. 

In this course a study will be made of the selection of flowers, 
shrubs and trees suitable for different types of homes and school 
buildings. The proper arrangement and grouping of the plants 
will be emphasized. Rural school grounds will be taken up in 
detail. 

Three hours per week, oni^ semester. Junior Degree Course. 
Credit: l x / 2 hours. 



■Lie 

-0^1 



d. Farm Management. 

This is a study of farm plans including size and location of 
buildings; fences, roads, different |^>es of farming, labor, owner- 
ship or rental, market problems, co-Aeration, records and accounts. 

Three hours per week, one semester. Seni or De gree Course. 
Credit: 1V 2 hours. 



7. .Agricultural Education. 

This is a course that deals with the method of teaching agricul- 
ture. Emphasis will be placed on the organization of the teaching 
material: how to teach various topics and how to use illustrative 
material, such as charts and slides. The organization of clubs and 
the home project method will bo discussed. 



24 STATE NORMAL SCHOOL 

Three hours per week, one semester. Senior Degree Course. 
Credit: 1% hours. 

8. Rural Economics. 

This course takes up some of the most salient features of the 
rural problems with emphasis on the rural conditions in Georgia 
and their effects on rural social life. County and community re- 
ports are made. 

Three hours per week, one semester. Junior. Credit: 1V 2 hours. 

9. Rural Sociology. 

This course is designed to give an interest and appreciation in 
rural life and rural life problems with emphasis on present ten- 
dencies and future growth in Georgia. The United States Census 
reports, and all available state house reports, are used in connec- 
tion with the text book. 

Three hours per week, one semester. Senior. Credit: IY2 hours. 

10. Economics. 

This course involves a study of the present economic conditions 
of rural districts, and the necessity of improving these conditions 
as a basis of other rural improvement; the economic development 
of agriculture; the factors of agricultural production; rent and 
present-day rent problems; the farmer's income; rural co-opera- 
tion and credits; the marketing of farm products. 

Three hours per week throughout the year. Junior Degree 
Course. Credit: 3 hours. 



11. Sociology. 

This course takes up a study of tl^ evolution of rural social con- 
ditions, the relation of physical enflnment to the several types of 
communities, economic and other JpFises which underlie changes in 
population, the present condition^pf rural communities, and existing 
rural social organizations, their functions, efficiency and present 
status. The influence of such^Tctors as production, transportation, 
communication, land tenure, Wnitation, and rural social, religious 
and educational organizations upon the general welfare of rural 
communities, the improvement of such influence, and the use of the 
survey to ascertain rural social needs are topics which receive care- 
ful consideration. 

Three hours per week throughout the year. Senior Degree 
Course. Credit: 3 hours. 



STATE NORMAL SCHOOL 2 5 

EDUCATION 



1. Pedagogy. 

A course presenting in simple and concrete form the psycho- 
logical basis of study, the typical methods of instruction, the daily 
problems of school life, and the art of teaching in its most practical 
form. 

One hour per week throughout the year. Freshman. 

2. Introduction to Teaching. 

This course will try to give the student a sympathetic under- 
standing of the problems. It will be practical but based on psy- 
chological principles. 

One hour per week throughout the year. Sophomore. 

3. Psychology. 

A course in Psychology from the point of view of educational 
theory and practice. A brief study is made of physiological psy- 
chology, followed by intensive work on the nature and function of 
the mental processes as revealed in human behavior. Through a 
study of perception, association, memory, imagination, reflective 
thinking, reasoning, judging, attention, interest, feeling, emotion, 
instinct, habit, will and character, the student gains a better un- 
derstanding of the problems involved in the training of children. 

Reading Course Required: Thorndike; James; Dewey; Tichener; 
Angell; Judd, Munsterberg; Breese. 

Three hours per week, one semester. Junior. Credit: 1% hours. 

4. Principles of Teaching. 

The work in this class is intended to be both scientific and prac- 
tical. It is based on the laws of psychology and their use in, the 
actual work of teaching. It makes use of modern scientific psy- 
chology and especially of recent investigations. The pupil is ex- 
pected to get practical control of principles by using them. He is 
expected to have his practices based on well understood reasons 
and to be able to modify his practices when occasion demands. 

References: Dewey, School and Society; James, Talks to Teach- 
ers on Psychology; Bolton's Principles of Education; Bagley, Edu- 
cational Values. 

Three hours per week for year. Junior. Credit: 3 hours. 

5. Child Psychology. 

Attention is given to the foundation of child study in other sci- 
ences, and to the more general, permanent, and practical truths 



26 STATE NORMAL SCHOOL 

thus far revealed by students of children, particularly regarding 
their physical nature, growth, development, abnormalities and de- 
fects with methods of remedy; tests and measurements, meaning 
of infancy; periods of childhood; suggestion, habit, moral develop- 
ment, influences affecting personality. 

References: Kirkpatrick's Fundamentals of Child Study; Rowe's 
Physical Nature of the Child; King's Psychology of Childhood; 
Sully's Studies of Childhood; Hall's Adolescence; Tyler's Growth 
and Education. 

Three hours per week, one semester. Junior. Credit: l 1 /^ hours. 

(i. History of Education. 

A study of the educational ideals, practices and tendencies of the 
past, the great educational reformers, and the princicples derived 
from them, the origin and development of modern educational 
theory and practice. The course embraces a study of oriental, 
classical, mediaeval, and renaissance education, present tendencies 
in education, modern school systems, and the American public 
school. Reading course required. 

References: Parker's History of Modern Elementary Education, 
Hoyt's Studies in the History of Modern Education; Graves' Great 
Educators of Three Centuries. 

Three hours per week, one semester. Senior. Credit: 1% 
hours. 

". School Management and Supervision. 

This course undertakes to prepare the student to understand the 
various problems which will arise in connection with the school 
other than instruction. It deals with routine, daily program, at- 
tendance, hygiene conditions, discipline, incentives, coercives, records 
and grading and the teacher's relations to school officers and the 
community. 

References: Dutton, School Management; Foght, The American 
Rural School; Sears, Classroom Organization and Control. 

Three hours per week, one semester. Senior. Credit: 1% 
hours. 

H. Practice Teaching. 

The members of the Senior class are required to do practice 
teaching throughout the year in the various grades of the Train- 
ing School and to co-operate in the work of the Rural School under 
the supervision and guidance of the head of the Department of 
Pedagogy and the Principal of the Training School, with the sympa- 
thetic and constructive criticism of skilled critic teachers. Before 



STATE NORMAL SCHOOL 27 

teaching, detailed lesson plans are prepared and submitted for 
criticism. 

Two hours per week throughout the year. Senior. Credit: 2 
hours. 

9. Common School Review. 

Provision will be made to give a rapid review of the common 
school branches to those who need the review. 

10. Conferences. 

The officers of the Department of Pedagogy, the officers and 
teachers of the Training School, and all the members of the Senior 
class meet once a week for conference and discussion of the work 
of the Training Schools and vital educational problems in general. 

One hour per week throughout the year. Senior. Credit: 1 hour. 

11. Term Paper. 

Original investigation of some important phase of education, with 
a written report thereon, is required of members of the Senior 
class. 

12. School Law. 

A course of lectures on the salient provisions of the laws relating 
to the common school system of the state. 
Special periods. Junior, Senior. 

13. Reading Course and Current Educational Literature. 

In addition to the regular course of study in this department, 
courses of reading are offered, based upon professional material at 
hand in the pedagogical department of the Carnegie Library of the 
State Normal School. A score or more of current educational peri- 
odicals coming to the Library form the basis of class conferences 
throughout the Junior and Senior years. 

Special periods. Junior, Senior. 

14. Principles of Secondary Education. 

This course is designed to give an intensive study of the mod- 
ern problems in secondary education. It will include a study of 
the ultimate and proximate aims of high school education, selection 
and presentation of subject matter, plans for the economic use of 
the student's time, and classroom management. It will involve the 
psychology of high school subjects, type lessons, solution of prob- 
lems and practical work. 

Three hours per week, one semester. Senior Degree Course. 
Credit: 1 y 2 hours. — - ^^ 

15. Genera] Methods of Teaching in High Schools. 

The course deals with the problems of classroom teaching. It is 



28 STATE NORMAL SCHOOL 

a general methods course for prospective high school teachers and 
supervisors. The following problems are treated: selection and 
arrangement of subject matter, economy in classroom management, 
teaching various subjects, individual differences, supervised study, 
the use of books, laboratory methods, questioning, measuring the 
results of teaching. Reading and practical work required. 

Three hours per week, one semester. Senior Degree Course. 
Credit: 1V 2 hours. 

16. Educational Psychology. 

This course is designed to acquaint the student with the more 
important laws and principles of psychology as they apply to the 
educative process, and to give a survey of the experimental find- 
ings in the learning process. Among the topics considered will be: 
native tendencies, habit formation, memory and association, laws 
of learning, individual differences, transfer of training, interfer- 
ence, fatigue and the mentally defective and the gifted children. 

Three hours per week, one semester. Junior Degree Course. 
Credit: IVz hours. *^*««"^* - 

17. Testing and Measurements. 

This course is planned to give a working knowledge of the more 
important standard tests for measuring the anility and achieve- 
ment of elementary and high school children. Practice in admin- 
istering tests and interpreting results will be an important part of 
this course. Special consideration will be given to the use of stand- 
ard tests in diagnosing, classifying and evaluating the progress of 
children in various school subjects. Intelligence tests, readings, 
laboratory work. 

Three hours per week, one semester. Junior Degree Course. 
Credit: 1V 2 hours. 

18. Primary Methods and Supervision. 

This course is designed to benefit teachers of special classes, 
supervisors and principals. It includes (1) the theory and practice 
of teaching beginners; (2) an analysis and demonstration of the 
principal methods; (3) a resume of recent scientific investigation; 

(4) a sketch of the historical development of primary methods; 

(5) the specific qualities essential to success in this type of work. 
Three hours per week, one semester. Junior Degree Course. 

Credit: 1% hours. * ____^^ 

19. Public School Curriculum. 

An intensive study is made of the curriculum of the Elementary 
and Junior High Schools as they are related to social conditions and 



STATE NORMAL SCHOOL 29 

needs. This study includes: the historical development of the 
course of study; basic principles for the selection, grading, and 
organization of public school subjects; a comparative study of 
curriculums from different sections of the United States. Special 
emphasis is placed upon designing pupil activities to meet voca- 
tional, social, and civic needs. Practical work required. 

Three peirods per week, one semester. J unior Deg ree Course. 
Credit: 1% hours. 

20. City, State and County School Administration. 

This is a study of the principles underlying an efficient state 
school system, both city and county, with special reference to the 
present and future needs of Georgia. Topics studied will include: 
educational surveys; the federal government in public education; 
school funds; school budgets; selection, preparation, certification 
and improvement of teachers; school libraries; buildings and equip- 
ment; consolidation; compulsory attendance; free supplies; retarda- 
tion; economy and efficiency. Field work and practical work re- 
quired. 

Three hours per week, one semester. Senior Degree Course. 
Credit: 1V 2 hours. 

21. School Supervision. 

The purpose of this course is the preparation of supervisors and 
supervising principles. This course considers the problems of the 
superintendents and principles in relation to attendance, organiza- 
tion, classification, marking systems, promotion plans, acceleration, 
retardation, elimination of pupils, records and reports. It will con- 
sider the function of the supervisor, methods of supervision and 
effective devices used by supervisors. Criticism and improvement 
of instruction and standards for judging instruction. Practical 
work. 

Three hours per week, one semester. Senior Degree Coursr 
Credit: 1V 2 hours. 

ELEMENTARY TRAINING SCHOOL 



The Training School is amply equipped with a library, a shop, a 
gymnasium, a kitchen, and a dining room, and the different class 
rooms are well equipped with modern appliances. 

The school is a well organized one of nine grades and the course 
of study is planned to meet present needs in the life of the child 
and to suit the interests of the various periods of child develop- 



30 STATE NORMAL SCHOOL 

ment. The work, so far as practicable, is based upon present day 
industries, and especially the industries which are taught in the 
school: Cooking, Gardening, Sewing and Manual Training. In ad- 
dition to the industries named, the course of study includes Read- 
ing, Writing, Spelling, Drawing, Painting, Language and Grammar, 
Literature, Elementary Science, Geography, Arithmetic, Algebra, 
History, Music, and Physical Training. 

Before any student is permitted to do practice teaching in the 
Training School, the equivalent of academic and professional work 
as given in the Junior class of the State Normal School must be 
satisfactorily completed. 

THE RURAL SCHOOL 



It is our purpose with the model building and modern equipment 
to help in adjusting the rural school to the agricultural and domes- 
tic life of the country; to demonstrate ways in which a rural school 
may be the social center of community life; to adjust the course of 
study to rural conditions and interests; to study the problem of con- 
solidation of schools, to show what may be done by one teacher in 
carrying out a practical course of study; to bring the student-teach- 
ers of the State Normal School in close contact with the actual 
problems of the country school. A schedule is arranged by which 
they may observe the daily work of the school and have practical 
experience in teaching in a country school. 

JUNIOR HIGH SCHOOL 



The Junior High School is organized along the most approved 
lines and includes the seventh, eighth and ninth grades. It is 
designed to give the full equivalent of the first two years of high 
school. It is used for observation, demonstration and teaching 
under supervision. 

ENGLISH 



1. Rhetoric and English Literature. 

A study of the principles of rhetoric and composition with fre- 
quent exercises in theme writing, and a careful study of the follow- 
ing classics: Scott's, The Lay of the Last Minstrel; Dickens's, A Tale 
of Two Cities; Shakespeare's, The Merchant of Venice; Tennyson's, 
The Idyls of the King; and Lamb's, Essays of Elia. 

Three hours per week throughout the year. Freshman. 



STATE NORMAL SCHOOL 31 

2. Literature and Theme-Writing. 

A study of the history of English literature, accompanied by a 
critical study of the masterpieces of some of the leading authors; 
theme-writing will be studied and practiced, the themes being 
based upon the studies in literature. 

Tliree hours per week throughout the year. Sophomore. 

3. Shakespeare. 

A careful study of Shakespeare's plays with attention to forma- 
tion of plot, character delineation, setting, and interpretation of 
thought. Frequent themes will be written and criticised in class. 

Three hours per week throughout the year. Junior. Credit: 
3 hours. 

4. Elements and Kinds of Literature. 

The entire year is given to a study of poetry, a book of se- 
lections from the works of the English poets being used as models. 
This study consists of an analysis of poetry, its elements, scansion, 
and varieties of forms. Occasional exercises in verse writing are 
used for fixing the poetic forms in mind. 

Three hours per week throughout the year. Senior. Credit: 
3 hours. 

5. The English Novel. 

In this course a study is made of the development of the novel 
from the earlier romances and the eighteenth century essay. Rep- 
resentative novels of Richardson, Fielding, Smollet, Austen, Scott, 
Dickens, Thackeray, George Eliot, Stephenson, Reade, Hardy, Kip- 
ling, Cooper, Hawthorne, and Howells, will be read outside of class 
and written reports made to the class from time to time. 

Three hours per week throughout the year. Junior Degree 
Course. Credit: 3 hours. 

H. The Development of the Drama. 

This course includes a study of the History of the Drama: The 
Greek, Drama, Latin Drama, French Drama, English Drama: Dra- 
matic Construction; Study of Masterpieces; Antigone; Everyman: 
Marlowe's plays; Ben Johnson's plays-; The Rivals; The School for 
Scandal; She Stoops to Conquer; Modern Drama of the English 
School, the French School, the German School, the Irish School, 
the Scandinavian School, the American School. 

Three hours per week throughout the year. Senior Degtf 
Course. Credit: 3 hours. 



32 STATE NORMAL SCHOOL 

HISTORY 



1. Medieval History. 

This course includes the study of the religious institutions of the 
Middle Ages, emergence and development of European states; the 
Crusades; effect of Oriental culture on Europe; rise of towns; trade 
and the common people; transition from Medieval to Modern ideals. 

Three hours per week throughout the year. Freshman. 

2. Modern European History. 

In this course the following topics will be studied; political uni- 
fication of European nations; changes in labor, manufactures and 
transportation; capitalism and the factory system; political and 
social reforms; nationalism, imperialism, international relations; 
the outbreak of the World War. 

Three hours per week throughout the year. Sophomore. 

3. Advanced Course in American Government, 

This course includes a study of: principles and functions of Gov- 
ernment; administrative organization in the United States; compari- 
son of Federal, State, and local forms; forms of citizenship and sov- 
ereignty in leading European states and America; methods of pop- 
ular control and expression of public opinion; parties; nature and 
scope of financial and budgetary method; regulation of commercial 
and labor interests; problems of Government reforms. 

Three hours per week throughout the year. Junior. Credit: 3 
hours. 

4. Contemporary American History. 

This course is based on a review of the nineteenth century of 
United States history; forming of the Federal Government; parties; 
the Westward movement; sectionalism; slavery; the Civil War; 
reconstruction; contemporary history and industrial era; growth 
of trusts and labor organizations; United States as a world power; 
international relations; banking, currency, and credit; the charac- 
teristic features of Americanism. i\ J 

Three hours per week throughout the year. Senior. Credit: 3 
hours. 

5. World Politics. 

This course will embrace a study of the causes and conduct of 
leadership in the great war; military and diplomatic causes; co- 
lonial conflicts in Africa; racial and political conflicts in the Bal- 
kans; balance of power, concert of Europe; German egemony and 



STATE NORMAL SCHOOL 33 

pan-German ideals; outbreak of war; modern methods of warfare; 
military movements on all fronts; origin and history of peace move- 
ments; past Peace conferences, aims and results; peace negotia- 
tions; Paris-Versailles conference; claims; attempted political and 
economic settlements; treaties; League of Nations; disarmament 
confrenece; international relations. The course purposes to train 
the students in the proper interpretation of acts and events of our 
own times, to discover and understand history in daily newspapers 
and periodicals, and to form logical and clear conclusions. 

Three hours per week throughout the year. Junior Degree 
Course. Credit: 3 horus. 

6. Problems of Government. 

This course is applied workings of American government and 
citizenship, and includes development of co-operation; growth and 
application of ideals of liberty and law; principles of business and 
industry; city and country life; problems of union; international 
relations; America and other nations; government control of health 
and disease; labor and industry; water and food supply; charity, 
crime and correction; education. 

Three hours per week throughout the year. Senior Degree 
Course. Credit: 3 hours. 

HOUSEHOLD ARTS 



Fees. 

A fee sufficient to cover the necessary expenses is charged in 
classes where laboratory work is done. These fees are due and 
payable in advance — at the beginning of each semester. 

Cooking Uniforms. 

Every girl taking cooking is required to have at least two all 
white cooking aprons, two hand towels three-fourths of a yard long, 
and two navy blue or white denim pot holders six inches square. 
The aprons must be made according to Pictorial Review Pattern 
No. 3786. The material should be firm, of good weight — cotton 
sheeting, "Fruit of the Loom," "Cabot Cotton," Normandy linen or 
Indian Head are suggested. The apron should be made even with 
the skirt of the wearer. These articles should be made and brought 
from home ready for use at the beginning of the term. 

1. Applied Dress Design. 

This course includes a detailed study of fabrics; a survey of the 
individual and social conditions which have influenced the design of 



34 STATE NORMAL SCHOOL 

costume in different centuries; a study of the fundamental princi- 
ples of design; and exercises involving the use of these principles in 
costume. 

Prerequisites: Household Arts 10 and 11. 

Three hours per week, one semester. Junior Degree Course. 
Credit: 1V 2 hours. 

2. Clothing. 

This course gives a general knowledge of garment making. The 
various stitches and processes ordinarily used in sewing are taught 
in the making of simple articles. Hygiene and economics of cloth- 
ing are studied in elementary form. 

Three hours per week, one semester. Freshman. 

3. Clothing. 

This course includes the fundamental processes of elementary 
sewing. Emphasis is placed on selection of materials with relation 
to design, utility, durability, and cost, and the care and repair of 
clothing. Simple garments are made for which both drafter and 
commercial patterns are used. Good technique and high standards 
of workmanship are stressed. 

Three hours per week, one semester. Junior. Credit: 1V 2 hours. 

4. Clothing. 

This course is planned for those who have had instruction in 
elementary sewing. The aims are to give the student a broader 
understanding of the scope and content of the subject matter in 
clothing by including problems which embrace the fundemental 
principles involved in the section and design of clothing, the theory 
and use of color, pattern making, and clothing construction. Pro- 
fessional work is included. 

Prerequisites: Household Arts 1 and 2. 

Three hours per week, one semester. Senior. Credit: 1% hours. 

5. Millinery. 

A course planned to meet the needs of students who are prepar- 
ing to teach. It provides instruction in the designing, selection, 
making and trimming, care, and remodeling of hats. Suggestions 
for teaching millinery are included. 

Two hours per week, one semester. Senior. Credit: 1 hour. 

6. Clothing. 

This course gives advanced practice in dressmaking, without the 
use of patterns. The practical work will be developed largely in 



STATE NORMAL SCHOOL 35 

muslin and tissue paper. The final problem of the course will be 
an afternoon dress. 

Prerequisites: Household Arts 11 and 13. 

Three hours per week, one semester. Junior Degree Course. 
Credit: iy 2 hours. 

7. Cookery. 

An elementary course in cookery designed to give a working 
knowledge of household processes connected with food. Attention 
is given throughout to sanitation, right habits of working, and to 
the care and management of kitchen furnishings. 

Three hours per week, one semester. Sophomore. 

8. Cookery. 

A laboratory course in which food preparation is co-ordinated 
with and based upon a study of the composition and nutritive value 
of foods. It is planned to give a thorough understanding of the 
principles underlying the preparation of different types of food, 
and also, to secure a fair degree of skill in manipulation of ma- 
terials and utensils. Emphasis is placed on neatness and orderli- 
ness and economy in use of materials. Simple home meals are 
planned and served, and the cost of food in relation to the income 
of the home and of the school is studied. 

Three hours per week, one semester. Junior. Credit: 1% hours. 

9. Cookery. 

This course provides opportunity for review of the principles of 
cookery, substitution and variation of recipes, economical use of 
leftovers and adaptation of receipts to school work. Practical prob- 
lems are provided for the planning, purchasing, preparation and 
serving of food for groups under pressure of economy of time, 
money and effort. Class discussions are held on sequence of les- 
sons, management and cost of lessons for public school classes. 

Prerequisites: Household Arts 2 and 3. 

Three hours per week, one semester. Senior. Credit: 1V 2 hours. 

10. Cookery. 

This course consists of an experimental study of special prob- 
lems in food preparation. It includes the study of cookery appa- 
ratus, the uses of different food materials; a qualitative and quan- 
titative study of recipes, of the chemical and physical changes pro- 
duced by heat and in the combination of materia 

Prerequisites: Household Arts 5 and 6. 



36 STATE NORMAL SCHOOL 

Three hours per week, throughout the year. Senior Degree 
Course. Credit: 3 hours. 

11. Foods. 

This course begins with the classification of foods based on their 
chemical composition and a detailed study of the important foods 
under each class. Special emphasis is placed on the nutritive value 
of each food, its place in the diet and its economical value. 

Three hours per week, one semester. Junior. Credit: 1 % hours. 

12. Home Management. 

This course is designed to give the students actual practical ex- 
perience and skill in the organization and management of the home, 
to test the ability of the student, and to set social relations and 
standards. It consists of class discussions and related practical 
work in the Practice House. The problems of the Practice House 
are used as a basis for the class discussion. The Practice House is 
owned by the Institution and is in charge of an instructor of House- 
hold Arts. The house maintains itself, and keeps up its own equip- 
ment. Every senior, majoring in Household Arts, is required to 
live in the house at least thirty days. 

Required of all Seniors majoring in Household Arts. 

Three hours per week, one semester. Senior. Credit: 1% hours. 

13. Home Nursing and Child Care. 

This course deals with the prevention and care of illness in the 
home and the health problems of the mother and child. It includes 
such topics as the proper surroundings for the sick, prevention and 
care of common ailments, food for the sick, first aid treatment for 
common emergencies, the physical care of the infant, the nursery, 
clothing and food for the infant and small children. 

Three hours per week, one semester. Senior Degree Course. 
Credit: 1V 2 hours. 

14. Hygiene. 

This course will consider the principles of personal and general 
hygiene and their application to every day life. 

Open only to degree students. 

Three hours per week, one semester. Senior Degree Course. 
Credit: 1% hours. 

15. Methods of Household Ails. 

A professional course, consisting of lectures and class discussions 
designed to meet the needs of students majoring in Household Art. 
A study is made of the history, organization and promotion of 
Household Arts and its articulation of subject matter, courses of 



STATE NORMAL SCHOOL 37 

study for special types of schools and equipment of laboratories 
are given. Special methods in class organization and management 
are discussed, and reference books, bulletins, and pamphlets are 
reviewed. 

One hour per week, one semester. Senior. Credit: V 2 hour. 

16. Nutrition. 

Lectures, discussions, and laboratory work. This course presents 
the fundamental principles of human nutrition and their applica- 
tion to the feeding of individuals, and families under varying phys- 
iological and economic conditions. A study of the proper diet for 
infants and young children, and of the school lunch, is included. 
The selection of subject matter, the adaptation of material and 
methods of presentation for high school pupils are discussed. 

Prerequisites: Household Arts 3 and 4. 

Three hours per week, one semester. Senior. Credit: 1% hours. 

17. Physiology. 

This course consists of a study of the construction of the human 
body, its ordinary behavior, operations or workings, and its proper 
management, protection and care. Emphasis is placed upon per- 
sonal and public hygiene and individual and general health. Sim- 
ple lessons in home nursing are included. 

Three hours per week, one semester. Senior. Credit: iy 2 hours. 

18. Textiles. 

This course comprises the history and development of textiles, 
the study of fibers, and the identification of fabrics, with emphasis 
on those points which affect the appearance, wearing quality, prices, 
and uses of materials. Suggestions are made for the correlation of 
the subject matter with other clothing subjects. 

Three hours per week, one semester. Junior. Credit: 1V 2 hours. 

LATIN 



1. Cicero. 

Four of Cicero's Orations will be read with special attention to 
their historical setting. The course will also include understanding 
Latin in the Latin order; careful study of vocabulary; the writing 
of a biographical sketch of Cicero. 

Three hours per week throughout the year. Freshman. 

2. Virgil's Aenied. 

Books I, II, and VI will be included in this course. Attention is 



38 STATE NORMAL SCHOOL 

given to Virgil's figures of speech; the declension of Greek nouns; 
review of forms and laws of syntax; the study of important myths. 
Three hours per week throughout the year. Sophomore. 

3. Selections from Horace. 

Papers are required on the Augustan Period. Construction and 
literary values are dwelt on. 

Three hours per week throughout the first semester. Junior 
Credit: 1% hours. 

4: Livy. 

This course involves a study of Livy's style; sight reading; em- 
phasis on translation into choice English. 

Three hours per week throughout the second semester. Junior. 
Credit: 1V 2 hours. 

5. Cornelius Xepos. 

In this course quick reading is encouraged, covering as much 
ground as possible. Sight reading is stressed. 

Three hours per week throughout the first semester. Senior. 
Credit: 1% hours. 

6. Ovid. 

In this course special attention is given to the story of the crea- 
tion. Important myths are studied. Stress is laid on sight reading. 

Three hours per week throughout the second semester. Senior. 
Credit: 1V 2 hours. 

7. Sallust. 

The books studied in this course will be Jugurtha and Cataline. 
Attention will be given the literary quality and the history of the 
literature. Sight translation will be included. 

Three hours per week throughout the first semester. Junior 
Degree Course. Credit: 1% hours. 

8. Tacitus. 

Attention will be given to the study of the Classical Period, the 
language, history, philosophy and law of the Romans. 

Three hours per week throughout the second semester. Junior 
Degree Course. Credit: 1% hours. 

9. Juvenal. 

Satires. Careful and accurate translations are stressed. A paper 
is required. 

Three hours per week throughout the first semester. Senior 
Degree Course. Credit: 1% hours. 



STATE NORMAL SCHOOL 39 



10. Lucretius. 



De Rerum Natura. Emphasis is placed, on accuracy of transla- 
tion. 

Three periods per week throughout the second semester. Senior 
Degree Course. Credit: 1V 2 hours. 

LIBRARY METHODS 



This course will include a study of the classification and cata- 
logue of the Normal School Library, the uses of encyclopedias, in- 
dexes to periodical literature and general reference books during 
the fall term. The spring term will include the organization of a 
school library, simple methods of accessioning, classifying and cat- 
aloguing, selection and buying of books. 

Three hours per week throughout the year. Degree Course. 
Credit: 3 hours. 

MANUAL ARTS 



1. Freshman Drawing. 

This course consists of drawing from objects and includes the 
first principles of composition. 

Three periods per week, one semester. Freshman. 

2. Basketry. 

In this course use is made of native material such as wire grass, 
pine needles, etc., in the making of at least two baskets. Raffia 
and rattan baskets are also taught. 

Three hours per week during one-half of first semester. Sopho- 
more. 

3. Paper and Cardboard Construct ion. 

The purpose of this course is to give students a knowledge of the 
various forms of this suitable for primary grades. The course in- 
cludes paper folding, cutting, and booklet making. 

Three hours per week during one-half of the first semester. 

Credit of one and a half hours is given for the combined 
courses of Basketry and Paper and Cardboard Construction. Fee, 
$2.00 for the combined courses. 

4. I took I) hiding. 

This course gives the processes of case binding and library bind- 
ing. A study of the history of printing and bookmaking is in- 



40 STATE NORMAL SCHOOL 

eluded. Problems in design will be one feature of this course. 
Three hours per week throughout the first semester. Juniors. 
For credits, see the next subject. Fee, $2.00. 

5. Woodwork and Mechanical Drawing. 

These are interdependent courses. Simple projects in shop work 
are introduced through the making of working drawings for the 
same. Good lettering is stressed. 

Three hours throughout the second semester. Juniors. 

College credit of three hours is given for the combined course of 
Bookbinding and Woodwork and Mechanical Drawing. Fee, $2.00. 

6. Blackboard Illustration. 

This course includes the study of characteristic features of 
various countries in landscape sketches; panels for calendars; black- 
board borders; holiday decorations; letters; birds; boats; log cab- 
ins; trees. Mediums used are soft white chalk, charcoal, and col- 
ored chalks. 

Three hours a week during one semester. Juniors. Credit: 1V 2 
hours. Fee, 50c. 

7. Advanced Woodwork. 

The problems of this course are suitable for Junior High Schools, 
and involve the designing and constructing of useful articles for the 
home and for personal use. Wood finishes will be considered. The 
students of this course may teach woodwork to fifth and sixth grade 
boys as part of their professional training. 

Three hours a week during one semester. Seniors. Credit: 1V 2 
hours. Fee, $2.00. 

8. Pottery. 

This is a practical course in work with clay; beginning with the 
"coiled" method of the American Indian and ending with the com- 
mercial method of today. 

Three hours a week during one semester. Seniors. Credit: 1% 
hours. Fee, $2.00. 

9. Drawing. 

In this course a study is made of: (1) Nature study: flowers, 
berries, etc., painted with water colors; decorative uses of plants; 
panels of flowers in temperine; (2) Perspective: practice in draw- 
ing groups of geometric solids; (3) Cast drawings: drawing from 
plaster Paris models; study of shapes size, value, and edges of 
planes; (4) Still life: grouped objects in pencil, pen and ink, water 



STATE NORMAL SCHOOL 41 

color, temperine; (5) Color: various types of color schemes; color 
schemes applied. 

Three hours a week during one semester. Juniors. Credit: 1% 
hours. Fee, $2.00. 

10. House Furnishing. 

The study of the principles of the art of furnishing the home. 
Color and color schemes. Period furniture. Styles of domestic 
architecture. 

One and a half hours a week throughout the year. Juniors. 
Credit: 1% hours. Fee, $2.00. 

11. Drawing in. 

This course embraces a study of: (1) Figure drawing, with 
proportion of the human figure; cast drawing; pose drawing; (2) 
Nature study: trees; outdoor sketches; landscape composition; 
(3) Perspective: interiors; exteriors; (4) Still life: advanced draw- 
ing of groups of objects; (5) Color. 

One and a half hours a week throughout the year. Seniors. 
Credit: 1 V 2 hours. Fee, $2.00. 



12. Design I. 

This course consists of: principles of design; tile; units; borders; 
surface patterns; blotter; panels and corners; lamp shade; book 
rack ends bowl; block prints; historic ornament. 

One and' a half hours a week throughout the year. Seniors. 
Credit: 1% hours. Fee, $2.00. 

13. Drawing III. and Art History. 

This course includes art history through lectures and required 
readings, also practical work in drawing and color, stressing com- 
position and artistic arrangement. Junior Degree. 

Three hours a week throughout the year. Credit: 1% hours. 
Fee, $2.00. 

14. Drawing IV. and Art Appreciation. 

This course consists of advanced work in art history and ad- 
vanced work in drawing and painting. 

Three hours a week throughout the year. Senior Degree. Credit: 
3 hours. Fee, $2.00. 

MATHEMATICS 



1. Plane Geometry. 

This course includes a study of elementary notions; angles; tri- 
angles; quadrilaterals; constructions; properties of circles; pro- 



42 STATE NORMAL SCHOOL 

portion with practical applications; properties, etc., of the regular 
polygon; construction. Reviews and original exercises will be con- 
ducted throughout the course. 

Three hours per week throughout the year. Freshman. 

2. Solid Geometry. 

This course includes a study of the application of plane geometry 
and arithmetic in measurement and construction of the various 
kinds of plane figures; form in the construction and measurement 
of solids; deducing and applying formulas for the measurement of 
the surface and volumes of prisms, cylinders, pyramids, cones, 
frustrums, etc.; the geometry of the sphere. Original propositions 
and exercises will be stressed. 

Three hours per week, one semester. Sophomore. 

3. Advanced Algebra. 

This course will include applications in solving geometric exer- 
cises. Special study will also be given to such topics as are not 
fully treated in an elementary course: (1) Radical quantities; (2) 
Negative, fractional and zero exponents; (3) Simultaneous quad- 
ratic equations; (4) Graphical representation; (5) Determinants; 
(6) Arithmetical and geometrical progressions; (7) Logarithms; 
(8) Reviews. 

Three hours per week, one semester. Sophomore. 

4. Plane and Spherical Trigonometry. 

This subject will deal with Trigonometric functions of an acute 
angle and use of natural functions and logarithms in the solution 
of the right triangle; functions of any angle and the sum differ- 
ence of two angles; the oblique triangle; applications in exercises 
and problems some of which are to be formulated from original 
data gathered by the student himself. 

Three hours per week throughout the year. Junior. Credit: 3 
hours. 

5. College Algebra. 

This course will embrace quadratic, irrational, and higher equa- 
tions; ratio, proportion, and variation; the progressions; the bi- 
nominal theorem; permutations and combinations; limits; infinite 
series; exponential and logarithmic series; determinants; and the- 
ory of equations. 

Three hours per week throughout the year. Junio r De gree 
Course. Credit: 3 hours. 



STATE NORMAL SCHOOL 43 

6. Elementary Analysis. 

This course consists of one semester's work in elementary ana- 
lytic geometry and one in elementary calculus. 

The analytic geometry involves co-ordinate systems; the curve 
and equation; the straight line and circle; curve plotting; functions 
and graphs, etc. 

The calculus involves differentiation and formulas for differen- 
tiation; slope tangent and normal; maxima and minima; rates; 
differentials; and a brief study of integration. 

Three hours per week throughout the year. Senior. Credit: 3 
hours. 5 , '^ 

7. Advanced Analytic Geometry. 

In addition to topics embraced in 6, this course will include polar 
co-ordinates; the transformation of co-ordinates; the properties of 
the parabola; ellipse, hyperbola; tangents and normals; and the 
analytic geometry of space. 

Three hours per week throughout the year. Junior Degree 
Course. Credit: 3 hours. 

8. Differential and Integral Calculus. 

In this course a careful study will be made of differentiation; 
limits; analytic and geometric applications; curvature; application 
of the derivative in mechanics; curve tracing in Cartesian and polar 
co-ordinates. 

The work in the integral calculus will embrace the indefinite in- 
tegral; the definite integral; formulas for integration; rational and 
irrational fractions; binominal differentials; trigonometric and defi- 
nite integrals; geometric applications; differental equatons; me- 
chanical applications. 

Three hours per week throughout the year. Senior Degree 
Course. Credit: 3 hours. 

MUSIC 



1. Public School Music. 

The teaching of sight reading and the fundamentals of the theory 
involved is the aim of the work of this year. The first part of the 
year's work is devoted to correct singing tone and the reading of 
simple one part melodies. Later, two part and three part music 
is taken. A frequent division of a large class is made on the basis 
of the rapidity with which the students read. This affords the in- 
centive of competititive work and makes it possible for the more 
musically inclined to advance according to ability and effort. Dur- 



44 STATE NORMAL SCHOOL 

ing both Junior and Senior years all are encouraged to collect ma- 
terial of current musical events. Occasional four minute talks and 
illustrations on subjects relative to increasing appreciation and un- 
derstanding of the best music and composers varies the usual and 
the more technical character of the class work. 

Three hours per week, one semester. Junior. Credit: iy 2 hours. 

2. Public School Music. 

Application of correct! teaching methods of music to children is 
the main purpose of this year's work. A general consideration of 
problems in music encountered by the ordinary grade teacher i3 
made with a view of a complete survey of the attainments in a 
course of study expected for each grade as a standard of accom- 
plishment. The child voice and help for the vocally deficient is 
studied and song material acquired. Work in more advanced sight 
reading is continued. The privilege of electing music for a prac- 
tise teaching subject and observation of lessons taught in the 
Elementary Practice School is a great aid in this year's work. 

Three hours per week, one semester. Senior. Credit: 1% hours. 

3. Public School Music. 

Advanced sight reading; methods for primary and intermediate 
grades including the explicit problems of each grade, song material 
and appreciation of listening lessons. A course of study by the 
year, months and weeks with material used is made for each grade. 
Organization and conducting of school bands and orchestras is also 
given. 

Three hours per week throughout the year. Junior Degree 
Course. Credit: 3 hours. 

4. Public School Music. 

Advanced sight reading and fundamentals of harmony. Methods 
for the upper grammar grades and high school with the accompany- 
ing detailed course of study and explicit material to be used in each 
grade is studied. Type demonstration lessons suitable for the use 
of supervisors in instruction of grade teachers are also planned. 
Principles involved in choral work and their direction are applied 
practically in the Senior chorus organization as described elsewhere. 
The disposition of changing boys' and girls' voices and other char- 
acteristics of adolescence as bearing on the music course of those 
grades is a matter of particular importance and receives the study 
due it as such. 

Three hours per week throughout the year. Senior Degree 
Course. Credit: 3 hours. 



STATE NORMAL SCHOOL 45 



5. Senior Chorus. 



The entire Senior class is organized for chorus at which practical 
application is made of methods for conducting community singing 
or grade and high school chorus songs. The chorus affords an ex- 
cellent opportunity for those studying public school music with an 
idea of specialization to have a laboratory for experiment and 
practice in choral work. This is found of invaluable aid as the 
teachers of today are expected to take active community interests 
outside the school or in it as community center. One formal con- 
cert is given annually by the chorus which includes selections from 
the best classics. 



Piano. 

Realizing the demands for better equipped Instrumental Music 
Teachers, the State Normal School has added Special Normal 
Course, the object of which is to fit the student (at very little cost) 
to teach Instrumental Music. 

Students are not only required to be acquainted with the repre- 
sentative works of the best composers, but must study the theory of 
music, harmony, history and pedagogy, and be able to analyze 
and criticise a musical composition intelligently. 

The standard has been raised, the course carefully planned, and 
the department is well qualified to carry on the work. The advan- 
tages are equal to any music school in the south. 

Students are graded and classified according to their technical 
skill, and their general musical knowledge. They are required to 
bring with them a complete list of studies and pieces, that they 
may be given credit for same. 

Especial attention is given to ensemble playing. The year is 
divided into four terms, nine weeks each. Tuition payable in ad- 
vance at time dormitory fee is due. Piano practice included. Tui- 
tion when once paid will not be refunded. 

Piano, two hours each week, $12.75 per term. 

Harmony, two hours each week, $9.00 per term. 

Voice. 

This course is divided into four terms of nine weeks each. A 
small fee of $12.75 per term is charged. This includes use of piano 
for practice. This takes up the proper placing of the voice, breath 
control, relaxation, phrasing, and song interpretation. Songs of 
the best known composers and study of arias of well known operas 
will be studied. 



4 6 STATE NORMAL SCHOOL 

Violin. 

Instruction in violin consists of a graded coursei embracing ele- 
mentary exercises and studies by Hohmann, Wolfhart, and others, 
progressing through Kayser, Books I and II, Mazas, Kreutzer, 
Schradieck Scale Studies Rode, Fiorillo Gavinies and others, with 
pieces by classic and modern composers, according to the profi- 
ciency of pupil. A candidate for diplioma in violin must have 
studied Kreutzer and Rode, and some of the easier concertos and 
sonatos, have a reasonable repertoire of solos suitable for recital 
purposes, and be able to play easy accompaniments on the piano. 
Requirements for Harmony, History of Music and Ensemble are the 
same as in piano. Post graduate courses will be given on appli- 
cation. 

ORATORY 



The course in Oratory are designed to develop the students in 
the art of expression through gesture, speech and presence, with 
the special idea of helping those who are to become teachers. 

The methods employed overcome the effects of repression, stim- 
ulate free endeavor, increase "the joy of the working" and develop 
creative power. Each student is trained to express herself in many 
ways — in story telling, in dramatic personations, in oral composi- 
tion, in platform reading and in literary interpretation. The stu- 
dent is taught to think and feel before an audience and to express 
these thoughts and emotions through her own individuality. 

This results in a natural style, cultivates and refines literary 
taste, strengthens the imagination and develops personal power. 
Any student will find this study invaluable in teaching any other 
subject, because oratory tends to bring poise, freedom from self- 
consciousness, a responsive voice and body, a keener imagination, 
emotions aroused and directed to the expression of the best in 
one's nature. The following courses are offered to those desiring 
special study in Oratory, and will be given in one private lesson 
and three class lessons per week. The work is designed to cover 
a period of two years of study. 

A certificate in Oratory will be given to students completing the 
courses as outlined below and also the following subjects: Psychol- 
ogy; History of Education; Principles of Education; Methods; Eng- 
lish; Junior Literature; Psysiology; Modern Language; Common 
School Music; Art History; Physical Culture. 

A fee of $9.00 for nine weeks will be charged students of this 
department. 



STATE NORMAL SCHOOL 47 

1. Literary Interpretation. 

This course involves Evolution of Expression or the fundamental 
principles through which a student develops her powers of expres- 
sion; selections from literature; platform deportment; recitals. 

One hour per week throughout the year. Junior. 

2. Vocal Technique. 

This course deals with articulation: phonetics, speech formation, 
pronunciation, impediments of speech; technique; study and use of 
voice instrument, control of breath, reasonance, flexibility, power, 
freedom; expressive voice culture; tone language, exercises empha- 
sizing the cultivation of the imagination to produce strong, bril- 
liant and expressive voices. 

One hour per week throughout the year. Junior. 

3. Bodily Expression. 

The aim of Bodily Expression is to train the body to become the 
free responsive agent of the soul's expression. The course deals 
with physiology and psychology of gesture; harmony of action — 
hand exercises; pantomime. 

One hour per week throughout the year. Junior. 

4. Educational Dramatics. 

The great dynamic force, the drama, plays such an important 
part today in the development of the child that serious thought 
must be given to it. We believe, with President Eliot of Harvard, 
that dramatic instinct is a tremendous power over children that 
ought to be utilized for their good. It is the purpose of this course 
to give the student a working knowledge of directing children's 
plays. Plays are studied from the view of a reading lesson to the 
actual public presentation. Several Seniors during the year will 
have complete direction of a play, training children of the Ele- 
mentary School. This includes planning and making of scenery 
and costumes. 

One hour per week throughout the year. Senior. 

5. Story-telling. 

The most universal method of imparting knowledge and of im- 
pressing moral and spiritual truths is through story-telling. Here 
all knowledge of child psychology is applied and students become 
familiar with every type of story. A "Story Hour" is conducted by 
Oratory students every Monday. 

One hour per week throughout the year. Senior. 



4 8 STATE NORMAL SCHOOL 

6. Advanced Interpretation. 

This course involves a study of one act plays, the short story, 
and modern poetry. Recitals are given. 

One hour per week throughout the year. Senior. 

PHYSICAL EDUCATION 



Physical education aims at the highest possible condition of 
health, through proper physical development. The mind and spirit 
are largely dependent upon the condition and cultivation of the 
physical nature. Only through harmony of body, mind and spirit 
can the highest degree of efficiency be attained. 

Requirements. 

Every student in the school is required to take work in this de- 
partment. It is a law of the state that no student may graduate 
without work in Physical Education. Those who are not able to 
take the regular work are given a course in theory. 

Before graduation each student must complete at least two years 
of work in Physical Education. 

Gymnasium Work. 

Work in this department includes free exercises, tactics, light 
apparatus, folk dancing, and games. The work is carefully graded 
to suit the needs of the various classes. In the Senior year normal 
training in regular class work is given. A fund of material for 
teaching purposes is accumulated and courses are given in the 
theory and practice of games and dances suitable for school room 
and playground. Special stress is placed upon a study of the 
health manual prescribed by the State Board of Education. 

Degree Course. 

This course will include work in the theory and practice of phys- 
ical education, such as hygiene, first? aid, methods, practice teach- 
ing, a study of the different systems of gymnastics, corrective work, 
advanced appartus, dancing and games. 

Three hours per week throughout the year. Degree Course. 

Athletics. 

The work of this department includes, in addition to the regular 
gymnastics, careful instruction in outdoor games and sports. A 
well equipped athletic field is provided for the use of the students. 
A number of Field Days are given during each year, and the vic- 
torious class is awarded the possession of a beautiful loving cup. 



STATE NORMAL SCHOOL 4 9 

Gymnasium Suit. 

The gymnasium suit adopted by the school consists of white 
middy blouse, black bloomers and black tennis slippers. These 
articles are part of the school uniform and must be purchased 
after reaching Athens. 

PUBLIC SPEAKING 



1. Public Speaking. 

This course includes lessons in articulation which involves free- 
dom of organs of speech; placement; accurate moulding of the 
elements of speech; pronunciation; also vocal technique which 
means breath control; development of resonance; placing of tones; 
purity, tone, projection, flexibility; compass; smoothness; power, 
and brilliancy of tones; freedom. Evolution of expression is the 
basal text. 

Three hours per week, one semester. Junior. Credit: 1% hours. 

2. Public Speaking. 

To some extent, time during this course must be given to meth- 
ods, in order to prepare the students for teaching. This part of the 
work will consist in methods for Primary and Grammar grades, 
and will include lectures, discussions, and practical illustrative 
exercises. Some of the phases of reading studied are: the relation 
of reading to other studies in the curriculum; methods of getting 
good reading; enunciation and pronunciation; phonics; pitch, in- 
flection, modulation, model work; the development lesson; conduct 
of the reading lesson; emphasis of the importance of good oral 
reading on the part of the teacher. 

Three hours per week, one semester. Senior. Credit: 1 V 2 hours. 

8. Public Speaking. 

The work in this course will consist in: Whatever pertains to 
preparing and delivering one's own speeches. Interpretation of 
great speeches, to train practical public, speakers. A comprehensive 
study of principles, using masterpieces of oratory, and illustrative 
matter from current affairs, politics, reforms, advertisement, and 
any other subjects of interest. Impromptu and prepared speeches. 
Each student must select a major topic on which he will write 
several speeches. Each student will be required to prepare and 
deliver lectures on specified teaching problems or subjects. 

Three hours per week through-out the year. Junior D 
Course. Credit: ?> hour-. 



50 STATE NORMAL SCHOOL 

ROMANCE LANGUAGES 



1. French. 

Optional with Latin and Spanish for State Normal School diploma. 
A course for beginners which consists of careful drill in pronuncia- 
tion, translation, conversation, dictation and the reading of easy- 
French texts. No prerequisite. 

Three hours per week throughout the year. Junior. Credit: 3 
hours. 

2. French. 

Optional with Latin and Spanish for State Normal School diploma. 
Prerequisite: French 1 or its equivalent. This course is a con- 
tinuation of French 1. It consists of a thorough review of grammar 
and syntax, constant practice in translating English into French, 
conversation and extensive reading. 

Three hours per week throughout the year. Senior. Credit: 3 
hours. 

3. French. 

Optional to students who have had French 2 or its equivalent. 
This course consists of advanced work in French. Extensive read- 
ing in and out of the class room. Explanation of texts. Rhetoric, 
compositions and essays in French. Conversation, lectures in 
French on literary topics. 

Three hours per week throughout the year. Junior Degree. 
Credit: 3 hours. 

4. French. 

Prerequisite: French 3 or its equivalent. This is especially a 
course of practice in teaching and is open only to students who 
have had the three courses as outlined above, or their equivalent. 
Of the three hours scheduled, two will be given to practice in teach- 
ing and the other to lectures in French by the Professor. Besides, 
extensive outside reading and reports in French on the books read 
will be required. 

French 3 and French 4 will be required for a Baccalaureat de- 
gree of the State Normal School, if French is elected. 

Three hours per week. Senior Degree. Credit: 3 hours. 

1. Spanish. 

Optional with Latin and French for State Normal School diploma. 
A course for beginners which consists of careful drill in pronuncia- 
tion, translation, conversation, dictation and the reading of easy 
Spanish texts. No prerequisite. 



STATE NORMAL SCHOOL 51 

Three hours per week throughout the year. Junior. Credit: 3 
hours. 

2. Spanish. 

Optional with Latin and French for State Normal School diploma. 
Prerequisite: Spanish 1 or its equivalent. This course is a con- 
tinuation of Spanish 1. It consists of a thorough review of gram- 
mar and syntax, constant practice in translating English into 
Spanish, conversation and extensive reading. 

Three hours per week throughout the year. Senior. Credit: 3 
hours. 

3. Spanish. 

Optional to students who have had Spanish 2 or its equivalent. 
This course consists of advanced work in Spanish. Extensive read- 
ing in and out of the class room. Explanation of texts. Rhetoric, 
compositions and essays in Spanish. Conversation, lectures in 
Spanish on literary topics. 

Three hours per week throughout the year. Junior Degree. 
Credit: 3 hours. 

4. Spanish. 

Prerequisite: Spanish 3 or its equivalent. This is especially a 
course of practice in teaching and is open only to students who have 
had the three courses as outlined above, or their equivalent. Of 
the three hours scheduled, two will be given to practice in teaching 
and the other to lectures in Spanish by the Professor. Besides, 
extensive outside reading and reports in Spanish on the books read 
will be required. 

Spanish 3 and Spanish 4 will be required for a Baccalaureat de- 
gree of the State Normal School, if Spanish is elected. 

Three hours per week throughout the year. Senior Degree. 
Credit: 3 hours. 






SCIENCE 

1. Physics. 

This course deals with a study of matter and force and the rela- 
tion of these to life and progress. The students are trained to get 
acquainted with the forms and forces around them and they also 
learn to make simple devices to use in the schools where no appa- 
ratus can be bought. Laboratory work is required. 

Three hours per week throughout the year. Freshman. 

2. Physics. 

This course treats of life and civilization as aided by fori 



52 STATE NORMAL SCHOOL 

energy, studied in connection with mechanics, heat, sound, light, 
magnetism, electricity, principles and applications of devices using 
energy. Laboratory work will be required. 

Three hours per week throughout the year. Junior Degree 
Course. Credit: 3 hours. 

3. Physics. 

This course will be a continuation of Physics 2. Special emphasis 
will be placed on the principles and applications of devices using 
energy. Laboratory work will be required. 

Three hours per week throughout the year. Senior Degree 
Course. Credit: 3 hours. 

1. Chemistry. 

Elements and inorganic compounds are studied. These subjects 
are taken up with the connection they bear to comfort and civiliza- 
tion. The relation of chemistry to the saving of many by-products 
of the home and farm will be considered. Laboratory work will 
be required. 

Three periods per week throughout the year. Sophomore. 

2. Organic Chemistry. 

This course will embrace a study of the compounds, relations, 
uses, and properties of carbon, and will include laboratory work. 

Three hours per week throughout the year. Junior Degree 
Course. Credit: 3 hours. 

3. Household Chemistry. 

This course embraces a study of composition, uses, sources, prop- 
erties, and economics of compounds relating to life in the home. 

Three hours per week throughout the year. Senior Degree 
Course. Credit: 3 hours. 

Biology. 

The plan in this course is to study typical plants and animals, 
leading up to a more detailed study of human physiology, anatomy 
and hygiene. This includes the study of protoplasm, metabolism, 
growth, reproduction, heredity and evolution. Instruction is given 
in the use of a microscope, the preservation of specimens and the 
making of collections. The living organisms are studied when pos- 
sible; otherwise preserved specimens, models, microscopic sections, 
the stereoptican will be used. 

Three hours per week throughout the year. Freshman. 



STATE NORMAL SCHOOL 53 

Botany. 

In this course the structure, functions, classes and uses of plants 
will be studied. 

Three hours per week throughout the year. Junior Degree 
Course. Credit: 3 hours. 

Zoology. 

This is a study of functions, habitat, relations, comparisons of 
animal life. 

Three hours per week throughout the year. Senior Degree 
Course. Credit: 3 hours. 



CARNEGIE LIBRARY 



This building, as indicated by its name, was the gift of Mr. 
Andrew Carnegie. It is well equipped with Library Bureau furni- 
ture and contains about ten thousand volumes with something like 
three thousand pamphlets. The faculty and registered students of 
the school have free access to the library and may draw books for 
home reading. To the general public it is for reference only. 

The Reading Room is of infinite value to the students both for 
general reading and reference work. The following magazines are 
one file: American Cookery, American Journal of Education, Ameri- 
can Magazine, American School Board Journal, Atlantic Monthly, 
Bookman, Century, Country Life, Current History, New York Times:, 
Current Opinion, Delineator, Education, Educational Review, Ele- 
mentary School Journal, Good Housekeeping, Independent, Industrial 
Arts Magazine, Journal of Education, Journal of Home Economics, 
Journal of Psychology, Kindergarten and First Grade, Ladies' 
Home Journal, Literary Digest, Manual Training Magazine, Mis- 
sionary Review, Musical America, Nation, National Geographic, 
Nature Study Review, New Republic, North American Review, Nor- 
mal Instructor, Outlook, Playground, Progressive Farmer, Readers' 
Guide to Periodical Literature, Review of Reviews, Saturday Even- 
ning Post, School Arts Magazine, School Century, School and Home 
Education, School and Society, School Review, Survey, Teachers' 
College Record, Textile World, Travel, Woman's Home Companion, 
Worlds' Work, Yale Review, Harper's Monthly, Mentor, Hibbert's 
Journal, American City, Woman Citizen. These magazines are 
bound at the end of each school year and prove a most valuable 
aid in the Reference Department. 

The library is open daily (except Sunday) from 8:45 A. M. until 
5:30 P. M., closing for the dinner hour. Books other than "Re- 



54 STATE NORMAL SCHOOL 

serves" may be borrowed from the library for two weeks. Reserved 
books are issued overnight only. 

It is the main purpose of the library to both create and stimulate 
a taste for good literature as well as serve the various departments 
in their reference work. It is our ambition to give every student 
of every department a working knowledge of the institution and 
thereby double its value to the student body. 



CORRESPONDENCE COURSE 



Teaching by mail is becoming more popular every day, and the 
facilities have now been so perfected that there is no method of 
study which equals that of the correspondence plan for giving depth 
of scholarship and accurate knowledge of the subject studied. The 
State Normal School has so arranged its courses of study that all 
correspondence students will secure full credit for the work which 
they do at home should they decide eventually to attend the Normal 
School at Athens. 

These courses are prepared by the heads of departments who are 
specialists in these branches. Directions as to text-books and les- 
sons, and lists of review questions, will be sent to the student. 
When the student writes out the answers to these questions and 
sends in her papers these will be corrected and graded and again 
returned to the student. Credit will be entered upon the records of 
the State Normal School for the work done, and this credit will help 
the student, who can come to the school later and take resident 
work, to obtain the diploma offered by this institution. 

The charges for the courses are as follows: 

Common School Review Courses General Cultural Courses 

Arithmetic $5.00 Algebra $6.00 

Grammar 5.00 Geometry 6.00 

History, American _ _ _ _ 5.00 Latin __________ 6.00 

Physiology 5.00 Rhetoric 6.00 

Geography 5.00 Literature 6.00 

Agriculture _______ 5.00 Civil Government 6.00 

Reading 5.00 

Spelling 5.00 

Genera] Pedagogical Course 

Dutton's "School Management." and Georgia School Law $5.00 

For full particulars in regard to any of these courses of study, 
address the President, State Normal School, Athens, Georgia. 



STATE NORMAL SCHOOL 55 

LECTURE COURSE 



The school maintains a Lyceum Course which is free to all the 
students of the school and in which are engaged the best platform 
performers we can procure. In addition to this, a series of lectures 
by prominent men and women in the state, who have accomplished 
things in the special line of work in which each is interested, is kept 
up throughout the year. 

Moreover, Athens affords the school wonderful opportunity of 
seeing and hearing those who have attained distinction along many 
lines of endeavor. The school, in fact, is at times embarrassed with 
the richness of its opportunities of this kind. From time to time 
such men as Dr. Campbell Morgan, Mr. George Foster Peabody and 
others of national reputation speak in the auditorium. But they 
are invaluable aids in giving finishing touches to the education 
which the school is striving to impart to its student body. 

MOTION PICTURES 



Motion pictures are frequently used by the various teachers to 
supplement their class-room instruction. This method of teaching 
has proven to be both interesting and instructive. 

The moving picture machine is also used by lecturers who visit 
the school and at such times when the students are not otherwise 
engaged some of the best popular films are shown. 

STUDENT ORGANIZATIONS 



1. The Young Women's Christian Association. 

The Young Women's Christian Association, through its social life, 
Bible study, mission study, church attendance and intercollegiate 
relationships, seeks to promote the spirit of Christian thinking and 
Christian living among students and to train them for Christian 
work. 

The Social Work consists in aiding new students to harmonious 
adjustment to the school life and its activities. 

The Course in Student Fellowship is carefully planned and the 
text books used are the newest and best, treating both home and 
foreign mission problems. 

Intercollegiate relationships have been established by delegations 
to the Georgia Student Volunteer Union, the Southern Conference 
of the Young Men's Christian Association, by visits of traveling 



56 STATE NORMAL SCHOOL 

student secretaries, delegates to the National Student Volunteer 
Convention, Cabinet training councils, visiting Secretaries of the 
churches and' W. C. T. U., and by the interchange of reports and 
methods with other associations. 

Church attendance is emphasized in order that the students may 
derive all the spiritual benefits possible from the excellent church 
facilities of Athens. 

2. Bible Study. 

The purpose of this course is to give such a general knowledge 
of the Bible as will furnish to the students a background for future 
work in detail. 

The lessons are arranged for systematic daily readings through 
the Bible, beginning with Genesis. Weekly reviews are held on 
these readings, bringing out such points about the great Book as 
every person ought to know. 

The aim of the teachers in presenting these lessons is to bring 
the students into loving acquaintance with God's Word. This course 
covers four years. 

The First Year's Course embraces the Law and History of the 
Hebrew Nation as found in the Bible from Genesis to Esther in- 
clusive. 

The Second Year's Course is a study of the Poetry and Prophecy 
of the Bible, beginning with the book of Job and extending through 
the Old Testament. 

The Third Year's Course is the Life of Christ, or the historical 
study of the four Gospels. The lessons are so arranged as to bring 
together the corresponding parts of the four Gospels for comparison. 
There is no attempt made to study these parts critically, but simply 
to present the facts as given by the four writers. 

The Fourth Year's Course is a study of the Acts of the Apostles, 
of the Epistles, and of Revelation. 

This course is entirely optional, but all students are encouraged 
to join one of these classes, and due recognition is given their work 
in the permanent records of the school. 

The Bible classes are taught by members of the Faculty. 

The State Normal School won second honor in this work in the 
United States at the Panama Exposition Young Women's Christian 
Associational National Contest in 1915. 

There has been an interest in the memorizing of Scripture pre- 
scribed by Helen Gould Shepherd, for which she presents a Student's 
Bible. The school has won 246 of these Bibles. 

Since 1922 Mrs. Gertrude Alexander has been giving the Campbell 
Morgan edition of the Bible. Last year eight were won. Bringing 
our number to 256. 



STATE NORMAL SCHOOL 57 

Students are urged to keep in their respective classes in Bible 
work as in other studies. 

The State Normal School won first honor in the United States on 
the Student Association Honor Roll at the Panama Exposition for 
the largest average in production to total enrollment in Mission 
Study and Social Welfare classes in 1915. The School won second 
honor places in the two subjects that follow: volunteer Bible Study 
classes and attendance on religious services. 

3. Woman's Christian Temperance Union. 

In conjunction with the Young Woman's Christian Association 
work of the school, there is an organized Woman's Christian Tem- 
perance Union which holds regular meetings once per month and 
endeavors to further the study and interest in the Temperance 
Cause. 

4. Altioria Literary Society. 

At one time there was only one society in the State Normal School. 
On account of the overwhelming number of members it was advised 
that two societies be formed. In 1905 the two literary societies, 
under their new names, Mildred Rutherford and Altioria. began 
their work anew. Professor Earnest gave us our name "Altioria." 
meaning higher and better. Since the date of our birth, under the 
aim and excellent prevailing spirit of our motto, "Excelsior," we have 
been growing each year, striving for the supernal and superior 
things in our school life. The aim of the Altioria Society is the 
advancement of scholarship by enjoying together the best to be 
found in literature and the development of "Ideal Womanhood" 
through faithfulness and usefulness to our school and to our fellows. 

5. The Mildred Rutherford Literary Society. 

The aim of this society is to develop the literary phase of the 
student life through the creation of an interest in and appreciation 
for literature, music and art. The betterment of the social life of 
the school is the result of the activities of this organization and it 
is in this connection that some of the closest friendships are formed 
which exist not only while in attendance here but the influence of 
which will be felt into the future. 

An example of the highest type of womanhood is set before the 
girls in the sponsor of the organization, Miss Mildred Rutherford, 
whose fine and noble character and the ideals for which she stands 
are ever a beacon light to those who know her. 

6. L' Alliance Francaise. 

One of the distinctive features of the French course is the oppor- 
tunity of the students to affiliate with the L'Alliance Francaise, an 
organization composed of those familiar with and interested in the 



58 STATE NORMAL SCHOOL 

French language both in this school and the other educational in- 
stitutions of the city. Meetings are held once a month, at which 
time prominent French scholars address the organization on some 
topic of general interest. This organization has been a means of 
creating a greater interest in and a wider knowledge for the French 
language. 

The Honorary President of the L' Alliance Francaise (Athens 
group) is Chancellor D. C. Barrow of the University, and the Pres- 
ident, Professor J. Lustrat, head of the department of Romance 
Languages at the University and at the Normal School. 

7. Glee Club. 

The purpose of this organization is recreative choral work as well 
as to afford an opportunity for the study of classical compositions. 
Membership is open to any member of the student body. The or- 
ganization gives two concerts annually and assists at other functions 
of the school. 

8. County dubs. 

Nearly every county in Georgia is represented at the State Normal. 
Many of these counties have enough students to organize and there 
are more than twenty county clubs. There are a number of benefits 
to be derived from these clubs. Among the most important are — a 
definite way to study home county and home conditions; a united 
band to ai din the development of county affairs; a splendid way for 
those from home to get together; a medium to interest other students 
in the school; a source of great pleasure and leisure. These clubs are 
doing splendid, constructive work. More counties are to be orga- 
nized and it is the aim of all of them to keep up the supply of mem- 
bers from year to year and to be of real SERVICE to the people at 
home. 

9. The Round Table. 

The Round Table is a gathering of all students who desire to at- 
tend at a regular meeting every Saturday night just when supper 
is over. The organization is nine years old and its aim is to furnish 
wholesome recreation and to develop a love for and a power to tell 
the best stories to be found in our literature. Current topics are 
discussed, songs rendered and some pleasing story told and com- 
mented on. This organization started with but six members at its 
inception, and now has increased in size until there is no room on 
the school campus that will hold the attendance without crowding. 

10. Athletic Association. 

The Athletic Association is an organization of the students to pro- 



STATE NORMAL SCHOOL 59 

mote and encourage outdoor sports and athletics and is under the 
direct supervision of the Department of Physical Education. 

The Association has a well-equipped athletic field, with courts for 
tennis, basketball, volley ball and other games. Field Days and 
various athletic contests stimulate interest in outdoor activities and 
provide sane, wholesome recreation. 

11. Alumni-ae Association. 

The Alumni-ae Association of the State Normal School is an or- 
ganization concerned with the welfare of the school and its alumni- 
ae, and with the professional advancement of education. It is the 
channel through which the school and its alumni-ae can be of mutual 
help to each other. Its purpose is to provide a scholarship fund, to 
promote loyalty to the school, and to disseminate the ideals for 
which the school stands. 

All graduates of the school are active members of the Association 
and all persons, who have at any time been students of the school, 
are associate members. 

The officers of the Association are as follows: President, Kate E. 
Hicks; Secretary, Iris Callaway; Treasurer, Mrs. H. C. Doolittle. 

12. Normal Light. 

The Normal Light is the student paper. It is issued in newspaper 
style. It is printed twice a month. All general school news; society 
dots; editorials; literary society pages; Y. W. C. A. notes and jokes 
form the basis of its development. The editors are elected from 
the student body. They do all the writing for the paper under the 
supervision of a faculty member. 

13. Crystal. 

The Crystal is the Senior Annual. Every Senior class publishes a 
Crystal. The book appears at the end of the year. It is a memory 
book in printed form. The editors are elected from the Senior class. 

STATISTICS FOR 1923-24 

Registered students to date (March 5, 1924), J361; students 
registered during Summer School, 4 69; pupils in Muscogee Ele- 
mentary School and Country School, 295; students registered for 
Correspondence Courses, 50; total, 1,475. 

Teachers and officers, 55. Counties represented by students, 130. 
Students holding diplomas from other schools, 444; students hold- 
ing first grade license, 65; second grade license, 43; students hav- 
ing experience in teaching, 69. Fifty percent of all our students are 
the sons and daughters of farmers. 

The total registration since the foundation of the school, 15,269, 



60 STATE NORMAL SCHOOL 

more than 90 percent of whom have since taught in our common 
schools. Total graduates to June, 1923, 2,128. Graduating class 
this year numbers, 232. 

Buildings: Academic buildings, 4; Dormitory buildings, 4; Din- 
ing Hall and Senior Hall building, 1; Rural School, 1; Carnegie 
Library, 1; Infirmary, 1; Practice Home, 1; Dairy barn, 1; Stock 
barn, 1. Total, 15. 



STATE NORMAL SCHOOL 

ROLL OF STUDENTS 1923-24 



61 



Senior Degree 



Name County 

Bailey, Flora Clarke 

Carson, Mabel Jackson 

Corley, Lucy Belle Early 

Drake, Daisy ______ Clarke 

Echols, Katie Sue _ Orange, S. C. 
Harvey, Josephine _ _ _ Sumter 
Hubert, Blanche Clarke 



Name 

Hughes, Mildred _ _ 
Kelley, Lillie Mae _ 
Mears, Annylu _ _ _ 
Pentecost, Mary _ . 
Sammon, Florence _ 
Younge, Augusta _ _ 



County 

_ Clarke 
_ Upson 
. Decatur 
Gwinnett 
Gwinnett 
_ _ Polk 



Junior Degree 

Hall, Mary ____ _ _ Richmond 



«6- 









Abercrombie, Ethel 

Adams, Fanibel _ Fulton 

Anderson, Sadie Mae _ _ Jasper 

Artau, Delores Glynn 

Bailey, Annie _____ Clarke 
Bailey, Mary Lou _ _ Sumpter 

Baker, Julia Madison 

Baldwin, Myrtle _ _ _ Sumpter 
Barnett, Labassare _ _ Madison 

Barnwell, Edna Hall 

Barnwell, Martha _ Hall 

Barrett, Lerlin _ _ _ _ Madison 
Benton, Frances _ _ Meriwether 

Bell, Jewel Clarke 

Bittick, Estelle Bibb 

Bloodworth, Lillie Bibb 

Boiling, Naomi _ _ Chattooga 
Bowen, Ruth ______ Milton 

Boykin, Elizabeth _ _ _ Carroll 

Brackett, Pauline Clarke 

Brady, Cora ______ Elbert 

Braselton, Thelma _ _ Jackson 
Braswell, LaRhue _ Meriwether 

Breedlove, Louise Coffee 

Brewton, Ida _____ Evans 
Bridges, Birdie _ _ _ _ Twiggs 
Bridges, Bruna _ _ _ _ T 



Senior ? *7 
_ Monroe Bridges, Lucy _____ Terrell 

Brown, Jessie Washington 

Brown, Edith _ _ _ _ Pulaski 

Brunson, Dorothy Houston 

Burnett, Mamie _ _ _ _ Sumter 



Burroughs, Lucile _ _ Madison 

Burt, Ada Mott - Sumter 

Calhoun, Nina Crisp 

Camp, Jonnie _____ Fulton 

Carroll, Grace Washington 

Cartledge, Sara Lincoln 

Chapman, Willie Maude.Screven 

Chastain, Lila Thomas 

Cheney, Beth Randolph 

Clark, Ruth Muscogee 

Collins, Dorothy _ Schley 

Collins, Lillie _ _ _ - - Grady 
Colvin, Elizabeth _ _ _ Henry 

Combs, Gladys Henry 

Cooper, Sara Taylor 

Conyers, Ruth Bartow 

Copeland, Edith Thomas 

Coulter, Marjorie _ _ Muscogee 

Cross, Florence Dougherty 

Cubbedge, Victoria — Chatham 

Daniel, Mary _ _ — Heard 

Davis, Bessie Mae Brooks 



/ 



62 



STATE NORMAL SCHOOL 



Name County 

Davis, Vera Mae _ _ _ _ Gilmer 

Digby, Mary _______ Pike 

Dillard, Frances _ _ _ _ Wilkes 

Dillard, Mildred _ _ Oglethorpe 

Dolvin, Margaret Newton 

Duggan, Georgia _ _ _ Pulaski 

Dumas, Ruth Taylor 

Duncan, Bess Oglethorpe 

Dunson, Jennie _____ Troup 
Edwards, Lillian _ _ _ _ Clarke 
Ethridge, Adele _ _ _ _ Sumter 

Ethridge, Clara Sumter 

Fanning, Annie Sue McDuffie 

Farmer, Sara Jefferson 

Frazier, Anne _ Jeff Davis 

Garrett, Jewell _ _ _ _ Walton 
Gaylord, Alberta _ _ Muscogee 
Gerkin, Addie _ _ _ _ Chatham 
George, Elizabeth _ _ _ Fulton 
Gibson, Florence _ _ _ _ Troup 

Gibbs, Elizabeth Tift 

Gnann, Rebecca _ _ _ Effingham 

Godwin, Ila _ Meriwether 

Gorden, Sarah _____ Gordon 
Gregors, Ruth _ _ _ _ Mitchell 
Gresham, Jessie _ _ _ _ Fulton 
Griner, Louise _ _ _ _ Mitchell 

Guest, Ethel Sumter 

Hale, Ruth ______ Clarke 

Hamrick, May Belle _ _ Pickens 

Hancock, Ethel _ _ Clarke 

Hardeman, Mildred _ _ _ Clarke 
Harris, Lena Mae _ _ _ Catoosa 
Harvey, Jimmie _ _ _ _ Sumter 
Hawes, Ava ______ Lincoln 

Hays, Olivia Lee 

Hays, Helen _______ Lee 

Hembree, Ozella _ _ _ _ Cobb 

Hemrick, Era _ _ _ _ Oconee 

Hester, Wyoline _ _ _ Douglas 
Hicks, Annie Marlin _ _ Macon 
Hill, Bernice ______ Banks 

Hill, LaTrelle Jackson 



Name County 

Hind, Minnie _ _ _ Dougherty 

Hipp, Bertha Gilmer 

Hirsch, Josephine _ _ Chatham 
Holliday, Edith _ _ _ _ Jackson 
Hooten, Eleanor _ _ Meriwether 

Howard, Alice Houston 

Hughes, Roxane _ _ _ _ Tattnal 
Hunter, Lucy Lowe _ Oglethorpe 

Hutchins, Myrtice _ Clarke 

Ingram, Eugenia _ _ _ Carroll 
Johnson, Mrs. Hollis _ _ Clarke 
Joiner, Frances _ _ _ Laurens 
Johnson, Bernice _ _ _ _ Sumter 
Johnson, Carrie _ _ Meriwether 
Johnson, Elsa Ann _ _ Clarke 
Jones, Lucy _____ Laurens 
Jones, Lorena _ _ _ _ Morgan 
Jones, Maude _____ Walton 
Jordon, Elizabeth _ _ _ Jasper 
Jordan, Lucile _ _ Washington 
Jordon, Louise _____ Wilkes 

Kerlin, Myra Lee Clarke 

Keese, Catherine Randolph 

Keese, Mary Lou _ _ Randolph 
Kehrer, Mary Grace _ Gwinnett 
Reiser, Martha ______ Bibb 

Kelley, Grace Lee _ _ _ _ Upson 

Kelley, Louise _ _ _ Gwinnett 
Kenney, James Paul _ _ Lincoln 
Kerlin, Myra Lee _ _ _ Clarke 
Kicklighter, Lothare _ Tattnall 
King, Syvie _____ Webster 

Kitchens, Christine Terrell 

Lane, Beulah ______ Evans 

Lenneau, Gracie _ _ _ Chatham 
Lewis, Eula ______ Lincoln 

Lindsey, Ruth _ _ _ _ Walton 

Littlejohn, Annie _ _ _ Walker 
Lovett, Etta _ _ _ _ Meriwether 

McDonald, Sara _ _ _ Jackson 
McGahee, Earline _ _ _ Warren 
McGee, Montine _ _ _ Gwinnett 
McRee, Mavis _____ Oconee 



STATE NORMAL SCHOOL 



63 



Name County 

Maddox, Ermine _ _ Gwinnett 

Mathis, Ethel Floyd 

Matthews, Nora _ Paulding 

Martin, Agnes _____ Carroll 
May, Agnes _ _ _ Washington 
Meadows, Nell _____ Carroll 
Means, Mary _____ Decatur 

Millton, Lillian Chatham 

Mitchell, Annie _ _ Rabun 

Mitchell, Ruth Clare _ _ Rabun 
Mitchell, Irene ______ Bibb 

Moon, Pearl _____ Campbell 

Moore, Elizabeth _ _ _ Wilkes 
Morton, Elizabeth _ _ _ Stewart 
Myers, Sallie Mae _ _ _ Clarke 

Neal, Rebecca Harris 

Nelson, Myra _____ Jasper 

Newberry, Doris _____ Bibb 

Norman, Ruby _ _ _ _ Wilkes 

Northcutt, Sara Frances _ Cobb 
Nussbaun, Lillian _ _ Chatham 
Oakes, Gladys _ _ _ Gwinnett 
O'Kelley, Lillian _ _ _ _ Clarke 

Orr, Agnes _ _ _ _ Washington 

Orr, Evelyn _____ Coweta 

Overby, Clara _ _ _ _ Stewart 

Paris, Kate ______ Rabun 

Parsons, Lucy Grace _ _ Banks 
Patterson, Mae _____ Banks 

Patterson, Mary _ _ _ Jefferson 

Pennington, Gussie Jefferson 

Pickett, Violet _____ Tift 
Pittman, Agnes _____ Bibb 
Powell, Mattie Belle _ _ Mitchell 
Prater, Clara Mae _ _ Gwinnett 
Pullen, Effie _____ Early 
Rankin, Elizabeth _ _ DeKalb 
Ray, Camille _ _ _ _ Wilkes 
Rish, Elise _______ Clay 

Roberts, Helen Jen 

Robinson, Willie Maude _ Troup 
Sanford, Lois _ _ _ _ Crawford 
Scott, Nell Miller 



Name County 

Shackleford, Louise _ _ Wilcox 
Shell, Flossie _ _ _ _ Campbell 

Sherrer, Edith Wilkes 

Shiflett, Nellie Marie Chattooga 
Sims, Clifford _____ Lamar 

Smith, Lena _ _ _ _ Oglethorpe 

Smith, Mattie Ree _ _ _ _ Clay 

Smith, Nettie _____ Houston 

Spratling, Susie Mae _ _ Coweta 
Stallings, Sara _ _ _ _ Coweta 

Stalworth, Blannie _ _ Laurens 
Story, Lucia ______ Harris 

Sturdivant, Alma _ _ _ Burke 
Swilling, Evelyn _ _ _ _ Clarke 

Taylor, Eva ______ Lamar 

Taylor, Ruby _ _ Lamar 

Templeton, Ruby _ _ _ _ Burke 
Tillman, Eva _____ Clinch 

Thomas, Jewell _ Franklin 

Thomas, Ruby _ _ _ _ Franklin 

Thompson, Virginia _ Gwinnett 
Toole, Willie ______ Miller 

Tucker, Lucile ______ Jones 

Turner, Dorothy _ _ _ _ Terrell 

Vaughn, Pearl _____ Wilkes 

Vining, Mary _____ Upson 

Walden, Lois _ _ _ _ Chatham 

Walker, Jane ______ Clarke 

Walker, Lyle Rockdale 

Wallace, Anne _ _ _ _ Houston 

Wallace, Mary _____ Harris 

Walters, Inez _ _ _ _ Stephens 

Walters, Louise _ _ _ Sumter 
Wehunt, Lois _____ Clarke 

Wells, Edna _____ Laurens 

Wells, Grace _____ Oconee 

West, Marion ______ Hall 

Whitaker, Marion _ _ Richmond 
Wilkins, Mildred _ _ _ Madison 
Wilkins, Helen _ _ _ Chatham 
Williams, Mary _____ Harris 

Williams, Sara Lee Meriwether 
Wills, Lillian _____ Jackson 



64 



STATE NORMAL SCHOOL 



Name 



County 



Xanie 



County 



Wilson, Dessa _ _ _ _ Newton 

Whitmire, Massie Mae Hall 

Wolf, Gladys _ _ _ _ Chatham 






Woodward, Mary _____ Tift 

Wright, Addie Dekalb 

Zeagler ,Iree _ _ _ _ Screven 

- 



Junior 



r 



Adams, Annie _ _ Meriwether 
Adams, Grace _ _ Meriwether 

Aderholt, Edna Franklin 

Alexander, Chelma Thomas 

Almon, Nellie _ _ _ Meriwether 
Arnold, Caroline _ _ _ Coweta 
Atkinson, Agnes _ _ _ _ Clarke 
Bagley, Ethel _ _ _ Muscogee 
Bailey, Bobbie _____ Troup 

Ballard, Ruby . Pike 

Banks, Evelyn _ _ Meriwether 

Barnett, Jewell Oconee 

Barnett, Nellie _ _ Taliaferro 

Brown, Jessie Washington 

Beckam, Lucile _ Houston 

Beddingfield, Louise _ _ Dooley 
Vivins, Sara ______ Jones 

Blanchett, Willie Mae _ Walton 
Boatner, Sara Lillie _ _ Clarke 

Bond, Lera Maud Madison 

Bond, Rena _____ Madison 
Bonner, Macy _ _ _ _ Lincoln 

Bowen, Ella Mae Franklin 

Bradfield, Avy _____ Henry 
Breedlove, Lula _____ Coffee 
Brown, Clyde _____ Dodge 

Brown, Eurilla Franklin 

Brown, Ruby _ _ _ Fulton 

Burgess, Grace _____ Wilkes 
Burrell, Willie _____ Rabun 
Burson, Mary _____ Carroll 
Caldwell, Lizabeth _ _ _ Harris 
Callier, Mattimae _ _ _ Talbot 

Cantrell, Agnes Gordon 

Cash, Montine _ _ _ _ Gwinnett 
Castlen, Marianne _ _ _ Monroe 

Chance, Florence Chatham 

Chandler, Tullie _ _ _ Oconee 



Chastain, Lota _ _ _ _ Thomas 
Cheney, Mary _ _ _ _ Randolph 
Christian, Mary _ _ _ _ Newton 
Chunn, Mae _ _ _ Meriwether 
Clenney, Inez _ _ _ _ Calhoun 

Cliett, Ruth Mitchell 

Coachman, Fannie Mae Seminole 
Cochran, Lucile _____ Cobb 

Coile, Florence _ _ _ _ Clarke 

Collins, Dessie _ _ _ _ Barrow 

Collins, Louise _ _ _ _ Clarke 

Combs, Pauline _____ Troup 

Conaway, Clarice _ _ _ Clarke 
Cook, Mary ______ Walton 

Cooper, Jeanette _ _ Gwinnett 

Cowan, Grace Clayton 

Cox, Johnny _____ Clarke 

Cox, Lila Clarke 

Cox, Thelma Taylor 

Craig, Gippie _ _ _ _ Gwinnett 
Craven, Helen _ _ _ _ Haraloon 
Crawford, Helen _ _ _ _ Harris 

Crawford, Mamie Bibb 

Crosby, A. G. Wilkinson 

Crow, Fay ______ Mitchell 

Crowley, Edith McDuffie 

Culpepper, Virginia Meriwether 
Dallas, Kathryn _ _ _ _ Upson 
Davis, Belle _ _ _ _ Gwinnett 
Dickerson, Adel _ _ _ Sumter 
Dickinson, Mattye _ _ _ Sumter 
Downs, Blanche _ _ _ _ Oconee 

Drewry, Ethel Mae _ Pike 

Drewry, Josephine _ _ _ _ Pike 

Driskell, Chas. M. Clarke 

Duggan, Mary Wyl Pulaski 

Dunahoo, Julia _ _ _ _ Barrow 
Dunson, Jennie _____ Troup 



STATE NORMAL SCHOOL 



65 



Name County 

Eaves, Celeste _ _ _ _ Haralson 
Eberhardt, Ruth _ _ _ Jackson 
Edwards, Carolyne _ _ _ Fulton 
Edwards, Grace _ _ _ _ Clarke 

Ellerbee, Dunnie Randolph 

Evans, Elizabeth _ _ Jefferson 
Everett, Cora Mae _ _ _ Bulloch 
Eyler, Mary _____ Chatham 

Flanigan, Mamie Lou _ Lincoln 
Flannery, Virginia _ _ Coweta 
Forrest, Reina Mae _ _ Sumter 
Gardner, Susan _ _ _ _ DeKalb 

Garrett, Mary _____ Walton 

Garrett, Sarah _ _ _ _ Wilkes 

Gartleman, Josephine Chatham 
Gates, Vivian _____ Troup 

Gholston, Mary Lucy _ _ Clarke 
Gibson, Helen _ _ _ _ Laurens 

Gilmore, Mildred _ _ _ Turner 
Gleaton, Gladys _ _ _ _ Worth 

Glenn, Florrie _ _ _ _ Oconee 

Glisson, Louise _ _ _ _ Thomas 

Goodwin, Lucy _____ Macon 

Green, Ruby ______ Jones 

Griffith, Ruby Lee _ _ Madison 
Grimes, Lois _____ Clarke 

Guest, Irlene _____ Sumter 

Guillebeau, Ina _ _ _ _ Lincoln 

Gunnels, Lynda _ _ _ _ Screven 

Haddock, Claudie Clarke 

Halliday, Josephine _ _ Stewart 
Halman, Lois ______ Troup 

Hammock, Frances _ _ _ Jones 
Hamrick, Laura Mae _ Haralson 

Hampton, Anne Mae Madison 

Hardman, Annie Lee _ _ Clarke 
Harman, Mildred _ _ _ Carroll 
Harris, Daisy _____ Terrell 
Harrison, Maymelu _ _ Johnson 
Hay, Annie Mary _____ Lee 
Hayes, Urania _____ Barrow 
Hellman, Rosalyn _ _ Chatham 
Henderson, Lucile _ Jasper 



Name County 

Henley, Kathryn _ _ Chattooga 
Henry, Martha _ _ _ _ Walker 

Hewell, Frances Wilkes 

Hinley, Pearl Effingham 

Holbrook, Esther Franklin 

Hollowell, Dorothy _ _ Chatham 
Holman, Lois _____ Troup 
Holman, Vesta _ _ _ _ Sumter 
Holt, Sara _____ Chatham 
Howard, Patsy _ Chattahoochee 
Howell, Alberta _ _ _ _ Dooley 
Hubbart, Annie _ _ _ _ Troup 

Hubbard, Evelyn Franklin 

Hudson, Elizabeth _ Dougherty 

Humphreys, Ruth Pulaski 

Hubert, Virginia Clarke 

Jackson, Cleo Jones 

James, Emeline _ _ _ _ Taylor 
Jenkins, Mrs. W. E. _ _ Clarke 

Jennings, Margaret Clarke 

Johnson, Essie Mae _ _ Muscogee 
Johnson, Fay _ _ _ Franklin 
Johnson, Lois _ _ _ _ Madison 
Johnson, Vivian _ _ _ _ Early 
Jones, Emily ______ Jones 

Jordan, Helen Terrell 

Jordan, Opal _ Muscogee 

Kidd, Agnes _____ Baker 

King, Mattie Jefferson 

Kinney, B. C. Lincoln 

Lackerman, Jessie _ _ _ Dooly 

Lane, Dorothy Jasper 

Lanier, Ruth _ _ _ _ DeKalb 

Lanier, Thelma _ _ Screven 

Lattay, Johnnie _ _ Oglethorpe 

Lathan, Helen Fulton 

Lazarus, Daisy _ _ _ _ Glynn 

Leybourne, Eloise _ _ _ Glynn 
Lifsey, Eliza _____ Taylor 

Lindsey. Flossie _ _ _ _ Clay 

Lively, lone _ _ _ _ Oglethorpe 

Long, Sara ________ Lee 

Loyd, Martha _ _ _ _ _ Troup 



66 



STATE NORMAL SCHOOL 



Name County 

McElwaney, Louna Coweta 

McLellan, Hazel Mitchell 

Mallard, Maggie Lee _ Chatham 
Mallery, Louise _ _ _ Chatham 
Mann, Allene _____ Fulton 
Mann, Martha, _ _ Meriwether 
Manry, Alice _____ Mitchell 
Mansfield, Nellie _ _ _ _ Wilkes 
Mapp, Gladys _____ Clarke 
Maxwell, Martha _ _ _ _ Talbot 
Meadows, Louise _ _ Taliaferro 
Meadows, Reba _ _ _ _ Tatnall 
Merritt, Jewell _ _ _ _ Webster 
Michels, Betty _ _ _ _ Chatham 

Miller, Florence Jackson 

Miller, Margaret _ _ _ _ Bibb 

Mills, Gladys _ _ _ _ Randolph 

Milton, Ellmore _ _ _ Jefferson 
Milton, Marie _____ Gilmer 

Moncrief, Elizabeth _ _ Coweta 
Moon, Louise _____ Walton 

Morcock, Orlena _ _ _ Chatham 
Murrah, Helen _ _ _ _ Carroll 

Nelson, Frances _____ Bibb 

Newby, Alice _____ Dooly 

Nicholson, Mabel _ _ _ Oconee 
Norwood, Susie _ _ _ Chatham 
Pace, Leila Maude _ _ _ Terrell 
Parker, Emma Lula _ Franklin 
Parks, Beatrice _____ Henry 

Partridge, Virginia _ _ Lincoln 
Pearce, Mabel _ _ _ _ Randolph 

Peacock, Evelyn _ _ _ _ Dodge 

Peek, Annie Laurie _ _ Newton 
Pennington, Hattie _ _ Jefferson 
Pennington, Maude _ _ McDuffie 
Perryman, Mildred _ _ Randolph 
Persons, Elsie _____ Upson 

Petrie, Idelle ______ Cobb 

Pickett, Mary Frances Newton 
Poindexter, Anna _ _ Calhoun 
Polk, Vivian _ _ _ _ Effingham 

Poole, Ruby _____ Gwinnett 



Name County 

Porterfield, Ruth Clarke 

Price, Louise _ _ _ Clarke 

Price, Minnie Mae _ _ Johnson 
Prince, Ruth _ _ _ _ Crawford 
Quattlebaum, Fay _ _ _ Barrow 
Read, Tillie Azile _ _ _ Oconee 
Redding, Louise Chattahoochee 
Richards, Leola _____ Hall 

Robinson, Sophie _ Glynn 

Rountree, Edyth _ _ Richmond 
Rowe, Myrtle _ _ _ _ Gwinnett 
Ruddell, Lois _____ Gordon 
Russell, Willie Mae _ _ Jones 
Rutherford, Fay _ _ _ _ Greene 
Sanders, Frances _ _ _ Jackson 
Satterwhite, Mildred _ _ Fulton 
Saunders, Margaret _ _ _ Taylor 
Scales, Mary _____ Banks 
Scott, Mary Frances _ Madison 
Scott, Janie _____ Calhoun 
Shelton, Ruby _ _ _ _ Warren 
Shepard, Hazel _ _ _ _ Miller 

Shockley, Edna Morgan 

Scholar, Alice ______ Hall 

Sims, Louise _____ Clarke 

Smith, Bessie _____ Greene 

Smith, Dorothy _ _ _ _ Dodge 

Smith, Grace _ _ _ _ Houston 

Smith, Harriet Grace _ _ Fulton 
Smith, Hazel _____ Talbot 

Smith, Louise _____ Oconee 

Smith, Mildred _ _ Harris 

Smith, Miriam _____ Talbot 
Smith, Ovida _ _ _ _ Calhoun 

Smith, Sara Wilkes 

Sockwell, Mary _ _ _ _ Newton 
Spears, Annie _ _ _ _ Newton 
Stanfield, Nona Mae _ _ Tatnall 
Stephens, Mary Frances DeKalb 
Stevens, Thelma _ _ _ Mitchell 
Stewart, Mollie _ _ _ _ Terrell 
Still, Mary _____ Rockdale 
Stokes, Grace ______ Bibb 



STATE NORMAL SCHOOL 



67 



Name County 

Stone, Myrtle _____ Clarke 
Stovall, Janie Lee _ _ Madison 
Stovall, Ruth _____ Elbert 

Strickland, Hallie Sue 

________ Oglethorpe 

Stripline, Elizabeth Harris 

Stripline, Mary Talbot 

Sutlive, Josephine _ _ Chatham 
Tabor, Elizabeth _ _ _ Madison 
Taylor, Furlow _ _ _ _ Macon 

Taylor, Pauline Dooly 

Templeton, Beatrice _ Richmond 
Templeton, Lillian _ Richmond 
Tharpe, Julia Drane _ _ Turner 
Thaxton, Mrs. J. R. _ _ Clarke 
Thompson, Annelea _ Chatooga 

Thompson, Blannie Harris 

Thompson, Lorena _ _ Walton 
Thornton, Virginia _ _ _ Clarke 
Thrasher, Louise _ _ _ Turner 
Thrasher, Sara _ _ _ Rockdale 
Tiller, Mary _____ Berrien 
Tucker, Fannie Lou _ _ Barrow 
Turner, Biby _ _ _ Meriwether 
Vance, Adelaide _ _ _ Gwinnett 
Verner, Ina _____ Walton 
Verner, Sarah _ _ Oconee, S. C. 



Name 
Wasdin, Julia _ _ _ 
Waters, Ida Mae _ _ 
Waters, Lois _ _ _ . 
Watkins, Christine _ 
Watkins, Lura Almari 
Watts, Mary _ _ _ _ 
Weaver, Lola _ _ _ . 
Welch, Emma _ _ _ 
Westbrook, Ethel _ _ 
Whatley, Victoria _ 

White, Helen 

Whittington, Edna _ 
Wiley, Myrtie Marie 
Wilhite, Helena _ _ 
Wilkins, Helen _ _ _ 
Williams, Mary E. _ 
Williams, Nelle _ _ 
Williamson, Odessa _ 
Wilson, Cortez _ _ _ 
Wilson, Jewel Mae _ 

Wilson, Thelma . 

Wood, Christine _ _ 
Wood, Memphis _ _ 
Wood, Mozelle _ _ . 
Worsham, Ruth _ .. . 
Wynn, Edith _ _ _ 
Wynne, Mattie _ _ _ 



County 

_ _ Bibb 

Hall 

Hall 

Talbot 

ne Douglas 
_ _ Rabun 
. _ Walker 

_ _ Butts 

_ Stewart 
_ _ Macon 
_ Spalding 
_ _ Taylor 
_ Stephens 
_ _ Clarke 

_ Fayette 
_ Gwinnett 
Meriwether 
_ _ Clarke 

_ Jackson 
_ _ Harris 
_ _ Coweta 

_ Coweta 
_ Gwinnett 
. _ Greene 
. _ DeKalb 

_ _ Bibb 
Oglethorpe 



Sophomore 






Adams, Sylvia _____ Fulton 
Banks, Bertie Violina _ Stephens 
Barlowe, Ethel _____ Dooly 
Baston, Lucile _____ Wilkes 
Bennett, Sara _ _ _ _ Clarke 
Berry, Elizabeth _ _ _ _ Lamar 
Bostwick, Alice _ _ _ _ Morgan 
Boyett, Maude _ _ _ Randolph 
Camp, Ella _____ Coweta 
Chandler, Molene _ _ _ Madison 
Cocraft, Louise _____ Bibb 
Crawford, Mabry _ _ _ _ Clarke 
Crowley, Lucile _ _ _ _ Clarke 
Culpepper, Florence Meriwether 



Culpepper, Margaret 
Dunstan, Grace _ _ 

Darnell, Otee 

Flemming, Paul _ _ 
Fowler, Carrie _ _ 
Glass, Annie Mae _ 
Gorham, Marion _ _ 

Hardin, Ruth 

Harrison, Thelma _ 
Haygood, Vera _ _ _ 
Hearn, Mildred _ _ 
Henry, Frances _ _ 
Hill, Mary Catherine 
Hodges, Bessie _ _ . 



Meriwether 

_ _ Clarke 

_ _ Rabun 

_ _ Clarke 

_ _ Clarke 

_ _ Walton 

_ _ Wilkes 

_ _ Monroe 

_ _ _ Clay 

_ _ Lamar 

_ _ Evans 

_ _ Walker 

_ _ Sumter 

. _ Screven 



68 



STATE NORMAL SCHOOL 



Hurst, Jennie Belle _ Seminole 
Jackson, Ollilu _____ Butts 

Joiner, Jewel Mae Dooly 

Jones, Nora ______ Jasper 

Keese, Leola Randolph 

Kilpatrick, Annie Mae _ Morgan 
Lane, Louise ______ Jasper 

Lee, Sara _ _ _ _ Meriwether 

Laurence, Frances _ _ _ Upson 
McKinnon, Susie _ _ _ _ Clay 

Mable, Sue _______ Cobb 

Maples, Rebecca Mitchell 

Martin, Cornelia _ _ _ _ Wilkes 
Miller, Edith _____ Terrell 

Miller, Elizabeth Terrell 

Nix, Beatrice ______ Bibb 

Page, Frances Clyde _ _ _ Bibb 



Parker, Eloise _ _ _ _ Screven 

Porterfield, Ollie Mae Clarke 

Read, Lucia _____ Oconee 

Rish, Cecelia _ _ Calhoun 

Sams, Caroline _ _ _ _ Newton 
Sanders, Mabel _ _ _ _ Calhoun 
Sims, Annie ______ Clarke 

Stephens, Eugenia Banks 

Thompson, Mattie Bell _ Harris 
Turner, Ruth _ _ _ Meriwether 
Waits, Hah ______ Jasper 

Walker, Clara Maude _ Screven 

Wallis, Ruth _ Forsyth 

Walters, Josephine Sumter 

Wasdin, Pauline _ _ _ Screven 

Wilkes, Mainee Louise Dooly 

Womble, Lucile _ _ Dougherty 



Freshman 



Bell, Lucile _____ Stephens 

Brackett, Delia Lee _ _ Clarke 
Castlen, Ida ______ Monroe 

Christian, Iris _____ Clarke 

Curston, Marion _ _ _ _ Dade 

Dellingar, Oliu _ _ _ _ Oconee 

Drake, Sara ______ Clarke 

Dye, Nona Aiken, S. C. 

Harris, Eleanor ______ 

_ _ _ _ St. Augustine, Fla. 

Huff, Alberta _____ Clarke 

Jones, Nelle _____ Madison 

King, Mary ______ Putnam 

Special and Ir 

Bell, Zealure Mae Clarke 

Boatner, Louise _ _ _ _ Clarke 
Carmichael, Mary Florence _ 

_ Morgan 

Cash, Elizabeth _ _ _ Gwinnett 
Christain, Curtis _ _ _ _ Clarke 
Flannigan, Jean _ _ _ _ Clarke 
Florence, Mrs. Marie _ _ Clarke 
Gerken, Addie _ _ _ Chatham 
Hodges, Lucile _____ Clay 



Mashbourn, Laurence Clarke 

Medlock, Lurline _ _ _ Dekalb 
Moody, Emily _ _ _ _ Whitfield 

Moore, Kathryne Whitfield 

Moss, Caleria Franklin 

Millikin, Mildred Clarke 

Pope, Ava _______ Clarke 

Robinson, Frances _ _ DeKalb 
Shivers, Evelyn _ _ _ Randolph 
Stovall, Mary Frances _ Morgan 
Strickland, Vivian _ _ _ Clarke 
Woodham, Martha Pulaski 



regular Students 

Lanneau, Grace _ 
McWhirter, Callie 
Morgan, Eunice _ 
Roberts, Kathryn 
Sanders, Nellie _ _ 
Shelton, Eleanor _ 
Strickland, Ethel _ 
Thompson, Louise 
Wehunt, Clyde _ _ 
Wehunt, Meerenie 



_ _ Chatham 
_ _ _ Clarke 
_ _ _ Clarke 
. _ _ Terrell 

_ _ Calhoun 
Buffalo, S. C. 

Seminole 

_ _ _ Screven 

_ Clarke 

Clarke 



STATE NORMAL SCHOOL 



69 



TRAINING SCHOOL ROLL 



First Grade 



Allen, Alban 
Barber, Henry- 
Booth, Florence 
Broyles, Bertha 
Bulloch, Felton 
Cagle, Harold 
Callaway, Lucy 
Cooksey, Wilbur 
Couch, Calvin 
Couch, Earnest 
Davie, Marion 
Davis, Harry 
Delaney, Virginia 
Doster, Frances 
Drake, Martha 
Fields, Eugene 
Hayes, Walter 
Hill, Reba 
Huff, Thomas 



Aaron, Charles 
Booth, Frances 
Brackett, Carnell 
Bulloch, Millie 
Cagle, Mildred 
Daniel, Gunter 
Christain, Felton 
Dunaway, Bertha 
Hardy, Harold 
Huntington, Hazel 

Anderson, Catherine 
Barber, Mary Lou 
Barber, Corinne 
Barber, Otho 
Bishop, Elmer 
Booth, Russell 
Bulloch, Pansy 
Bryan, Lona May 
Camp, T. C. 



Jarrett, J. D. 
King, Alice 
Lawrence, Allen T 
Mize, Louise 
McClure, Mary F. 
McLeroy, Henry 
Norton, Carolyn 
Poss, Wilsie 
Papa, Tresa 
Sanders, Marie 
Simms, Rosa 
Seagraves, Robert 
Sell, Edward 
Truett, Margarett 
Tyson, Willa May 
Upchurch, Herman 
Winn, David 
Yearwood, Nell 



Second Grade 



Jarrett, Ostell 
Jarrett, Odell 
Jarrett, Robins 
Matthews, Dwight 
Oldham, Doris 
Oldham, Frances 
Pridgeon, Lucy 
Reed, Clayton 
Warwick, Ila May 
Wortham, Rufus 



Third Grade 



Carlisle, Joe 
Carlisle, Earnest 
Carter, Joseph 
Doster, Virginia 
Echols, J. B. 
Edison, Florie 
Fulcher, Irma 
Harlow. Willie Lou 
Marable, Dorothy 



70 



STATE NORMAL SCHOOL 



Martin, Hermine 
Mize, Mamie 
McClure, Janette 
Papa, Mary 
Patten, Carol 
Petty, Marion 



Addison, Joseph 
Bulloch, Bertha 
Christian, Oda Lee 
Collins, Walter 
Couch, Florine 
Drake, Harold 
Edwards, Charles 
Fulcher, Harold 
Hill, Ralph 
Kenney, Helen 
Nicholson, Bertie 
Petty, Frank 



Aycock, Lucile 
Barber, Clarence 
Bulloch, Wyatt 
Daniel, Randolph 
Doster, Louis 
Fields, Pauline 
Kenney, Bertha May 
Lindsay, Mary F. 
Matthews, Henry 
McCaskell, Eldred 
Mitchell, Grace 



Anderson, J. T. 
Bevers, Estelle 
Bowden, Tom 
Brackett, Donald 
Carter, Dorsey 
Chappell, Nell 
Conyers, Ab 
Couch, Kathleen 
Davis, Voncile 
Doster, Curtis 



Shetterley, Fay 
Tyson, Thetus 
Whitehead, Carlton 
Whitehead, Winston 
Winn, Louise 

Fourth Grade 

Pledger, Frank 
Pollard, Ida 
Poss, Hazel 
Prater, William 
Reynolds, Sara 
Saye, Evelyn 
Summerlin, Raymond 
Truett, Evelyn 
Truett, George 
Tyson, Eunice 
Wehunt, Quillian 
Wilson, Harry 



Fifth Grade 



Mize, Addie Sue 
Oldham, Grace 
Oldham, Ruth 
Pridgeon, Mary 
Sanders, Mardell 
Scoggins, James 
Sorrough, Roselyn 
Veal, Odessa 
Whitehead, Eugenia 
Winn, Vivian 
Wortham, Thurmon 



Sixth Grade 



Dunaway, Alfred 
Fowler, Frances 
Hubert, Douglas 
Huff, Claude 
Joiner, Rosena 
Jones, Vesta 
Kenney, Martha 
Lawrence, Harvey 
Marable, Mallis 
Mize, Wayne 



STATE NORMAL SCHOOL 



71 



Papa, Florice 
Papa, Mildred 
Pound, Stokely 
Ritchie, H. B. 
Slaughter, Nat 



Spratlin, Susie M. 
Upchurch, Mary D. 
Wages, David 
Waters, Frank 



JUNIOR HIGH SCHOOL 



Aaron, Clarence 
Adams, H. T. 
Anderson, Ida Belle 
Anderson, Lois 
Christian, Lawrence 
Davis, Blanche 
Elder, Charles 
Fowler, J. B. 
Henry, Joel 
Huff, Mozelle 
Jarrett, Frances 
Jennings, Walter 



Aycock, Mary 
Aycock, Lessie 
Bennett, Leonora 
Bray, Agnes 
Cagle, Lois 
Carter, Fred 
Conway, Leo 
Copeland, Iva J. 
Crawford, Quilla 
Daniel, Lucile 



Calhoun, Carolyn 
Crawford, Lucy Lee 
Dickerson, Nezzie 
Fisher, Louise 
Gaines, Helen 



Burns, Edna 
Byrd, Stanley 
Calbord, Herchel 



Seventh Grade 

Johnson, Annie Lene 
Nicholson, Louise 
Lindsay, J. B. 
Mitchell, Daisy 
Oldham, Marvin 
Oldham, Raymond 
Peek, Amelia 
Reynolds, Robert 
VanStraaten, Eugene 
Winn, Elizabeth 
Whitehead, James 
Whitehead, Paul 

Eighth Grade 

Eidson, Nellie M. 
Fleming, Felton 
Hale, Eddie 
Hughes, C. D. 
Joiner, Mollie 
Lowe, Effie 
Pope, Mary Jim 
Shetterley, Ruby 
Wehunt, Winnie Lee 
Walker, J. Y. 

Ninth Grade 

Herbert, Sadie 
Jarrett, Lucile 
Langston, Marguerite 
Logan, Maggie 
Norris, George 

RURAL SCHOOL 
First Grade 

Dellinger, Marshall 
Fowler, Pinkie 
Frix, Annie Laura 



72 



STATE NORMAL SCHOOL 



Lester, Rufus 
Miller, Alfonsa 
Prather, Troy 
Rice, Hope 

Anchors, Jack 
Cleveland, Grover 
Colley, Richard 
Doster, Walter L. 
Eunn, Edward 
Epps, Crawford 
Frix, D. S. 
Graham, Howard 
Hamilton, Billie 
Kenney, Bobbie 
Lester, John Willie 
Lester, Leon 

Burns, Telford 
Brackett, Cornell 
Colvard, Clayton 
Dellinger, Garnett 
Epps, Howard 
Epps, Mattie Lou 

Dellinger, Bethie 
Driskell, Doyce 
Graham, James 
Kenney, Wilson 
Lester, Oscar 

Burns, Elmer 
Dellinger, Dessie 
Doster, Grace 
Driskell, Velma 
Fowler, Alice Nelle 
Kenney, Hazel 

Johnson, Andrew 
Nelson, Ruby 

Driskell, Dennis 
Rice, Isaac 
Summary by grades: 
9; Fifth, 12; Sixth, 3; 



Rumsey, Willie 
Strickland, Grover 
Witcher, Bennie 

Second Grade 

Maynard, Carlton 
Miller, Lillie 
Morrora, Elsie 
Nelson, Alice 
Prather, Odell 
Rumsey, Una 
Sorrough, Billie 
Strickland, Guy 
Threlkeld, Clayton 
Threlkeld, J. B. 
Witcher, Lula Belle 

Third Grade 

Fowler, Louise 
Johnson, Jessie 
Tester, Arthur 
Threlkeld, Frank 
Wallace, Evelyn 

Fourth Grade 

Lester, Sallie Lou 
Nelson, Mary 
Rumsey, Ina 
Witcher, Eula Mae 



Fifth Grade 



Kenney, Susie 
Lester, Ellie 
Lester, Theodore 
Maynard, Nellie Mae 
Payne, Donold 
Rumsey, Ruby 



Sixth Grade 



Wallace, Thomas 

Seventh Grade 

Sorrells, Annie Mae 

First. 13; Second, 23; Third, 11; Fourth, 
Seventh, 3. Total, 7 4. 



STATE NORMAL SCHOOL 

Athens, Georgia 
APPLICATION FOR ADMISSION 

102 

Name in full, surname first Age 

i'ost Office address , County 

Name of parent or guardian 

Wluit school did you last attend ?__ _;■ __ 

Name of Principal? 

What grade or class did you finish? — 

Do you hold high school diploma'.' 

From what school ? 

Have you ever attended the State Normal School? When? 

If you have attended an accredited high school, have you had your principal 

fill out the high school certificate blank 

Have you a license to teach? What Grade? 

Have you taught? How many months? 

Do you wish to take an academic or an industrial course? 

For what class do you thing you are prepared ?____ 

When were you last successfully vaccinated? 

Is your general health good?__ 

Are your eyes in good condition? 

Are your teeth in good condition? 

Have you carefully read the catalogue 

Will you cheerfully abide by the rules? 

On what day do you expect to reach Athens? Wliat hour? 

Over which railroad will you come? 

You cannot be admitted to the school unless you bring a letter from your 
physician stating that you have not been exposed to any contagious disease 
for the last thirty days. See HEALTH CEBOTFICAT.E BLANK (next to the 
last page of the catalogue). 

If you are a graduate or a student of any accredited high school, send in, 
before August loth, records of your standing upon a blank which will be fur- 
nished you by any accredited high school principal. If you have been a mem- 
ber of a high school not accredited, bring written statement of your scholas- 
tic attainments signed by the principal of your school. 

With this application, send letters of recommendation from responsible 
parties in your neighborhood. 

Read the catalogue of the school and this blank carefully; if you desire to 
become a student of this institution, till out the blank fully in your own hand- 
writing, and mail as enrly as possible to 

JBRE M. POUND, President, 

State Normal School. 

Athens. Qeorgtn. 



A CANDID WOK I) WITH PARENTS 

Students get restless and homesick before the Christinas holidays 
begin, and again before the season ends. They write begging let- 
ters to their parents, asking permission to come home. The school 
in consequence suffers confusion, and its work is seriously crippled 
thereby. A week or so of valuable time is practically lost out of the 
session every year for reasons like these. 

It has therefore become necessary to establish the following regu- 
lations: 

Students must not leave the school before the holidays begin, or 
before the session ends, and fall term students must not re- 
tardily when the session is resumed after the holidays, without per- 
mission from the Dean, Mr. H. B. Ritchie. The student violating 
this rule will not be allowed to re-enter the school. 

Parents will please not give their children permission to go home 
or visit neighboring towns for trivial causes. Absences of this kind 
militate against the student and against the work of the school 
more, perhaps, than all other causes combined. 

The Dean will allow no variations or exceptions except for provi- 
dential reasons. When these reasons arise in the home, parents or 
guardians must communicate directly with the Dean by Letter, tele- 
gram or telephone. 

Piease refer to the Dean all letters from students asking for \ 
tions from these proper regulations. 

Except for providential reasons, you ought not to ask the Dean 
to set them aside. 







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BULLETIN 



OF 



The State Normal School 

ATHENS, GEORGIA 



Twenty-second Annual Session, 1925-1926 

MARCH, 1925 



Issued Quarterly by the State Normal School 



Entered at the Post Office at Athens. Ga., as Second Class Matter, November 
8th, 1913. Under Act of Congress of July. 1S93. 



Vol. 12. Serial No. 23 No. 1 




CARNEGIE LIB 




MUSCOGEE ELEMENT 




CALENDAR, 1925-26 



1925 

Sept. 1st, Tuesday — School Dormitories open. 
Sept. 1st, Tuesday — Classification of Students. 
Sept. 2nd, Wednesday — Classification of Students. 
Sept. 3rd, Thursday — Fall Term begins. 
Dec. 23rd — Christmas Holidays begin. 

(Recitations end Tuesday, December 22nd). 

1926 

Jan. 5th, Tuesday — Re-opening of School. 

Jan. 13th to 20th — Midterm Examinations. 

Apr. 17th, Saturday — Founder's Day. 

May 23rd, Sunday — Commencement Sermon, at 11:00 A. M. 

May 24th, Monday — Annual Concert, at 8:00 P. M. 

May 25th, Tuesday — Annual Meeting of Board of Trustees, 10 A. M. 

May 26th, Wednesday — Graduating Exercises, at Noon. 



New students may enter at any time during the year, but it is 
better for them to enter September 3rd, or January 5th. 



BOARD OF TRUSTEES AND OFFICERS 



B. S. MILLER, Columbus, Ga President 

Members ex-officio 

Governor Clifford M. Walker Atlanta, Ga. 

State Superintendent of Schools, Port E. Land Macon, Ga. 

Chancellor, University of Georgia, David C. Barrow Athens, Ga. 

Members-at-Large 

Mrs. W. W. Stark Commerce, Ga. 

Mrs. J. E. Hayes Montezuma, Ga. 

Members City of Athens 

A. H. Davison Athens, Ga. 

Mrs. Julia Ashton White Athens, Ga. 

Members Representing Trustees of University of Georgia 

Judge Loyd 'Cleveland Griffin, Ga. 

H. J. Rowe Athens, Ga. 

Howell Erwin Athens, Ga. 

Members Representing Congressional Districts 

First District, Joseph W. Smith Reidsville, Ga. 

Second District, W. V. Custer Bainlbridge, Ga. 

Third District, J. M. Collum Americus, Ga. 

Fourth District, B. S. Miller Columbus, Ga. 

Fifth District, Mrs. Howard McCall Atlanta, Ga. 

Sixth District, Frank F. Jones Macon, Ga. 

Seventh District, Mrs. Annie Freeman Johnson Rome, Ga. 

Eighth District, S. B. Yow Lavonia, Ga. 

Ninth District, L. M. Brand Lawrenceville, Ga. 

Tenth District, Mrs. Ira E. Farmer Thomson, Ga. 

Eleventh District, Jerome Crawley Waycross, Ga. 

Twelfth District, Judge W. W. Larsen Dublin, Ga. 

Secretary and Treasurer 
G. A. Mell Athens, Ga. 



COMMITTEES 



Salaries — Rowe, Barrow, Collum, Brand, Custer, McCall, Johnson, 
Hayes. 

Prudential — Ballard, Barrow, Rowe, Davison, White. 

Legislative— ^Cleveland, Custer, Stark, Hayes, McCall, Crawley. 

Uniform — Brand, Yow, McCall. 

Teachers and Course of Study — Ballard, Yow, Crawley, Smith, 
Jones, Collum, White, Stark, Hayes. 

Finance — Brand, Davison, Cleveland, Custer, Farmer, Johnson. 

Laws and Regulation — Cleveland, Rowe, Larsen, Jones, Farmer, 
Smith. 

Buildings and Grounds — Barrow, Yow, Smith, Rowe, Collum, White, 
Larsen, Stark. 



STATE NORMAL SCHOOL 

OFFICERS AND FACULTY 



DAVID C. BARROW, LL.D Chancellor Ex-Officio 

Chancellor of the University of Georgia. 

JERE M. POUND, A.B., LL.D President 

A. RHODES Business Manager 

H. B. RITCHIE Dean 

MRS. H. C. DOOLITTLE Registrar 

MISS FRANCES ROWE Record Clerk 

MISS EMMIE JONEiS Bookkeeper 

G. A. MELL Secretary and Treasurer 



MRS. GERTRUDE A. ALEXANDER, A.M., 

Expression; Assistant in English. 

MISS FRANCES RANDOLPH ARCHER, 

Librarian. 

MRS. J. W. BAILEY, 

Assistant in Piano Department. 

MISIS ESTHER BENSON, 

Public School Music. 

MRS. W. E. BROACH, B.S.H.E., 

Household Arts. 

PETER F. BROWN, A.M., 

English. 

MISS MaNITA BULLOCH, 

Assistant, Oratory. 

MISS IRIS CALLAWAY, B.S., 

Assistant in Department of Mathematics. 

MRS. LENA CHANDLER, 

Housekeeper. 

MISS LUCILE CHARLTON, 

Critic Teacher. 

MISS CARRIE CLAY, 

Assistant, English Department. 

MISS NELLIE COLBERT, 

Matron, Gilmer Hall. 

MRS. A. J. CONYYERS, 

Trained Nurse. 

W. L. COOKSEY, 

Farm Superintendent. 

MISS KATE DOWNS, 

Critic Teacher. 



STATE NORMAL SCHOOL 

WILLIAM T. DUMAS, A.M., Ped. Dr., 

Mathematics. 

DAVID L. EARNEST, A.M., 

Science. 

MRS. AGNES EBERHARDT, 

Piano. 

MISS LAURA ELDEiR, 

Teacher of Rural School. 

MISS LOUISE GLASS, B.S., 

Assistant in Science' Department. 

MISS EDITH GUILL, 

Assistant in Department of Physical Education. 

MISS LILLIE HENNING, 

Critic Teacher. 

MISS IRMA HICKS, 

Assistant in Department of Household Arts. 

MISS KATE HICKS, 

Principal Elementary School. 

MISS ROBERTA HODGSON, A.M., 

History. 

SCOTT HOLLAND, A.B., 

Assistant, Romance Languages. 

MISS ANNIE MAE HOLLIDAY, 

Assistant in Department of Manual Arts. 

MISS ELVA KLEIST, 

Assistant in Household Arts Department. 

MRS. MAGGIE LAMB DIN, 

Matron, Bradwell Hall. 

MISS ANNIE LINTON, 

Manual Arts. 

JOSEPH LUSTRAT, LL.D., Officer d'Academie, 

Romance Languages. 

FREEMAN MoCLURE, A.B., 

Assistant, Romance Languages. 

MISS ANNIE V. MASSEY, 

Critic Teacher. 

MISS MOINA MICHAEL, 

Y. W. C. A. Secretary; Matron, Winnie Davis Hall 

FRANK J. OSTERMAN, 

Assistant in Department of Manual Arts. 

MRS. FRANK OSTERMAN, 

Critic Teacher. 

MISS ANNETTE PHELAN, 

Health. 



8 STATE NORMAL SCHOOL 

H. B. RITCHIE, A.M., 

Education. 

E. S. SELL, M.S.Agr., 

Agriculture and Rural Social Science. 

MISS FLORENCE SIMPSON, A.B., 

Critic Teacher. 

J. H. SIMS, 

Engineer. 

MISS INEZ SPARKS, 

Critic Teacher. 

MISS HELEN L. SPROUT, 

Latin and Greek. 
MISS LURA B. STRONG, 

Physical Education. 

MISS LILLIE THOMPSON, 

Assistant in Department of Household Arts. 

MISiS CAROLYN VANCE, B.L.I. , 

Oratory. 

MISS ALICE WALKER, A.B., 

Critic Teacher. 

MISS SARAH WEBB, Ph.B., 

Assistant in Department of Education. 

MISS THELMA WILSON, 

Critic Teacher. 

MISS ESTER WOLLA, 

Assistant in Household Arts Department. 

MISS MARY M. WOODS, L.B., 

Assistant in Department of Agriculture and Rural Social Science 

MISS MAY ZEIGLER, A.M., 

Assistant in Department of Education. 



STATE NORMAL SCHOOL 



FACULTY COMMITTEES, 1925-26 



Library: Archer, Hicks, Sprout, Brown, Hodgson, Zeigler. 

Calendar and Entertainments: Linton, Eberhardt, Rhodes, Benson, 
Callaway, Clay, Vance. 

Schedule: Alexander, Callaway, Ritchie, Sell, Dumas. 

Promotion and Publicity: Sell, Earnest, Holliday. 

Curriculum: Brown, Ritchie, Alexander, Sell, Linton, Baird, Sprout, 
Dumas Strong. 

Publication: Sell, Brown, Holliday. 

School Organizations: Ritchie, Strong, Sell, Earnest, Michael, Col- 
bert. 

Classification: Dumas, Brown, Ritchie, Sell, Alexander, Callaway, 
Webb. 

Alumi-ae: Hicks, Callaway, Clay, Guill, Webb, Walker, Downs, 
Vance. 

Welfare: Rhodes, Conyers, Strong, Baird, Phelan, and Matrons. 

Grounds and Buildings: Rhodes, Sell, Hicks, Lambdin, Colbert. 

Employment: Earnest, Hicks, Ritchie, Baird. 

Records: Dumas, Webb, Linton, Holliday, Sprout, Guill, Wolla, 
Kleist. 

Uniform: Baird, Thompson, Archer, Strong. 

Absence: Earnest, Webb, Dumas. 



10 STATE NORMAL SCHOOL 

HISTORICAL 



The Trustees of the University of Georgia donated to the State 
the building known as Rock College and from six to ten acres of 
land tontiguous thereto, together with the late George R. GiLmer 
fund. Under the condition of Governor Gilmer's will, this sum 
must be used to train teachers in the elementary branches of an 
English education only. The condition attached to these gifts of 
the Turstees of the University was that the State should establish 
at Rock College a Normal School for the education and training of 
teachers for the rural schools. 

An Act was passed by the Legislature of Georgia in 1891: 

"To establish, organize and maintain a State Normal iSchool as a 
branch to the University, to appropriate money for the same, and 
for other purposes." This Act received the approval of the Gov- 
ernor, October 21, 1891. By the provision of this Act, the State 
received from the Trustees of the University, as a donation for the 
purpose of establishing a Normal School, the building known as 
Rock College and a tract of land of not less than six nor more than 
ten acres upon which the college building stood, lying just outside 
the limits of the City of Athens, Ga. The Act also provided for a 
Normal School Commission, consisting of the State School Com- 
missioner, who should be the Chairman, the Chancellor of the Uni- 
versity, and "three citizens of Georgia, experienced in teaching, to 
be appointed by the Governor." 

It is interesting to note that the water used by the School came 
from a well, and the water was declared to be pure and wholesome 
and was so cold that no ice was needed. 

The lower floor of Rock College was divided into lecture rooms, 
restaurant, 'hall and assembly rooms. The second and third floor.s 
were used us a dormitory. These rooms were furnished by the ap- 
propriation of $500.00 from the City Council of Athens in 1892, 
with wire cots, tables, chairs, buckets and other necessary articles 
of furniture. 

The Act creating the State Normal School was 'passed in 1891, 
and short sessions of the school were held during the summer 
months of 1892, 1893 and 1894. The Commission had at its com- 
mand only the interest of the Gilmer fund which was transferred 
for safe keeping to the Trustees of the University by the Trustees 
of the estate of the late George R. Giil'mer. The interest on this 
fund amounted to $1,050.00 a year, from which a commission of 
$50.00 a year was deducted for the expense of administration. In 
1892 there were added to this, the Peabody Institute fund of 



STATE NORMAL SCHOOL 11 

$800.00, and the County Institute fund of five counties, which met 
at Rock College for one week, and amounted to $125.00. There- 
fore, the School was carried on in 1893 with the sum of $1,923.00. 

The session of 1892 began July 11th, and lasted seven weeks. 
Exclusive of the attendance during the County Institute week, the 
roll of students numbered 112, representing thirty-two counties. 

So far as the resources of the college for the year 1893 are con- 
cerned, they are best explained by an extract from the minutes of 
the Commission at their meeting in Atlanta, April 1, 1893: 

"The Chairman made a statement of the efforts that had been 
made to induce the Legislature to appropriate a sum of money for 
the permanent establishment of a State Normal 'School, and stated 
that the Legislature had failed to make an appropriation for the 
purpose named. Dr. William E. Boggs then stated that the net in- 
terest on the Gilmer fund, amounting to $1,000.00, would be avail- 
able on the first day of July. He said, also that the people of Athens 
were desirous of having the Normal School operated during the 
coming summer, 1893, and that the grand jury of Clarke county 
had, at 'his request, made an appropriation of $400 for the purpose. 
The citizens of Athens had also made up a private subscription of 
$537 to be added to the fund. These resources, added together, 
made a total of $1,937 for the summer session of 1893." 

The private subscriptions from the citizens of Athens were se- 
cured by Dr. Edwin D. Newton and Mr. T. W. Reed. This must 
have been a tedious undertaking, for many of the subscriptions 
only amounted to fifty cents. 

The session of 1893 began July 5th, and lasted six weeks. There 
were enrolled 116 students from thirty-five counties. These pupils 
were not all present at the same time. Some came for a week, 
others for two weeks, others for a month, while many remained 
during the entire session. 

The nature of the work done during the sessions of 1892 and 
1893, the enthusiasm of the students, the apparent demand for an 
enlarged and well-equipped Normal School, induced the Normal 
School Commission to appeal to the Legislature of 1893 for an ap- 
propriation to remodel, equip, and operate the State Normal School. 
The Legislature, however, took no action in the matter, and the 
Normal School Commission was again left with limited means to 
carry out the privisions of the Act creating the School. 

A meeting of the State Normal School Commission was held in 
Atlanta to take into consideration the work of the School for the 
summer of 1894. 

The Chairman of the Commission stated that the Legislature had 
made no appropriation for the support of the School during the 



12 STATE NORMAL SCHOOL 

year of 1894, and that the only money available was the interest on 
the George R. Gilmer fund. 

After some discussion, the Commission decided to open the col- 
lege for a month during the summer of 1894, and the following 
resolution was passed: 

"Resolved, That the State Normal School at Rock College be 
opened for one month during the summer of 1894, beginning from 
the 17th day of July, and that the interest on the Gilmer fund, 
accruing July 1st, be used for defraying the expenses of the ses- 
sion." 

Another resolution was also passed and was as follows: 
"Resolved, That the Normal School Commission, recognizing the 
generosity of the grand jury of Clarke county, the City Council and 
citizens of Athens in the aid they have hitherto given the Normal 
School, and fully grateful for their past favors, yet in view of the 
urgent necessities of the School, respectfully suggest to the grand 
jury that an appropriation for the year 1894 would greatly aid in 
continuing the prosperity and insuring the success of the Normal 
School.'" 

"Resolved, That Dr. William E. Boggs, Professor David Barrow, 
Jr., be requested to present this resolution to the next session of 
the grand jury." 

The grand jury received the resolutions, and in their presentments 
made an appropriation of $750.00 to the State Normal School, pro- 
vided a session of eight weeks was held. This provision was 
cheerfully agreed to by the Commission, and the day of opening 
of the Normal School for 1894 was changed from July 17th, to 
July 5th. 

The State Normal School enrolled 17 5 students during the sum- 
mer of 1894. Fifty-one counties were represented in this student 
body. 

The success of the summer session under the direction of Mr. 
Lawton B. Evans made a permanent Normal School a necessity and 
the Legislature of 1894 gave financial assistance to the School and 
fixed the annual appropriation at ten thousand dollars. 

It was peculiarly fitting that Captain S. D. BradwCll was chosen 
as the first president of the State Normal School, after it was per- 
manently established. Probably no man had done more for the 
teachers of the State, and no one understood their needs better, or 
sympathized with them in their work more. He was possessed with 
a remarkable memory for names and faces, and while State School 
Commissioiner, he probably knew more men in Georgia than any 
other man. This fact was an invaluable aid to Captain Bradwell in 
getting the School established. 



STATE NORMAL SCHOOL 13 

The school was opened April 17, 1895. The 17th of April was 
observed as Founder's Day for many years in the school and ap- 
propriate exercises were conducted. Miss Mamie Mathews of Ogle- 
thorpe county was the first student to register in the school. The 
attendance during the spring was very small, but the summer 
months brought a much larger enrollment. 

Captain S. D. Bradwell tendered his resignation as President of 
the School at a meeting of the Commission held March 7, 1901. 
Mr. E. C. Branson was elected to succeed Captain Bradwell. Cap- 
tain Bradwell had been President since the permanent organization 
of this institution in 1895, during the short period of six years, 
under his administration the School was organized and had grown 
to such an extent that the annual enrollment was well above six 
hundred. 

In 1912 President E. C. Branson resigned to accept the head of 
the department of Rural Economics and Sociology, and Mr. Jere 
M. Pound was elected President. 

1. Gilmer Hall. 

This building was erected in 1860 by the University of Georgia 
and was donated to the State Normal School in 1891. At first the 
Normal School was completely housed in this one building but it is 
now used exclusively as a dormitory. It was named for Governor 
Gilmer, as the income from a fund left by his will was used to help 
found the State Normal School. 

2. Bradwell Hall. 

In 1896 this (building was completed as a two-story structure and 
the third floor was added in the following year, and was made pos- 
sible through subscriptions by the teachers in the school. At first, 
part of the lower floor was used as a dining hall and the other part 
of the building was used as a dormitory for young men. It is used 
entirely now as a girl's dormitory. It was named for the first presi- 
dent of the school. 

3. Old Auditorium. 

In 1898 from appropriations of that year, the commission au- 
thorized the erection of this building. It is two stories high, with 
an auditorium on the first floor and Class-rooms above. 

4. Winnie Davis Memorial Hall. 

The Daughters of the Confederacy planned this building to per- 
petuate the memory of Winnie Davis, daughter of Jefferson Davis, 
and it was through their efforts that this hall was built. It was 
completed in 1902 and is used as a dormitory. Various Chapters 



14 STATE NORMAL SCHOOL 

of the Daughters of the Confederacy maintain rooms in the build- 
ing and make appointments of the students to occupy the rooms. 
Rooms are secured in the building by applying to Chapters who 
have furnished the different rooms. 

5. Muscogee Elementary Training School. 

George Foster Peabody gave the money to build and equip this 
building and it was completed in 1902. A well organized school of 
seven grades is carried on in this building to give the Senior class 
practice in teaching before they are allowed to graduate. The 
building was so named because Muscogee is Mr. Peabody's native 
county. 

6. Smith Building. 

This building was completed in 190 6. It was made possible 
through gifts by James M. Smith, George Foster Peabody, the 
/State, Faculty, and a number of small contributors. It contains 
class-rooms and the administrative offices, and was named for the 
late James M. Smith. 

7. Dining Hall. 

The dining hall was also completed in 1906. The first floor of 
this building is used as a dining hall while the second floor is 
kcown as (Senior Hall and is used as a dormitory. 

8. Carnegie Library. 

This building was given by Andrew Carnegie to the State Normal 
School and is of course used as a library. It contains about ten 
thousand volumes, and was erected in 1910. 

9. The Rural School. 

This is a modern one-room rural school building on the campus 
to give the Seniors practice in teaching in a country school. The 
building is we'll lighted and heated and complete in every detail. 
The children come from the country thus making it a rural school 
from every point of view. It was built in 1911. 

10. Dairy Barn. 

This structure is of concrete, modern and sanitary in every way, 
with a large silo made at one end. It was built in 1914 and is 
large enough to accommodate seventy cows. The school farm is 
located on the Oconee river three miles from town. This farm 
was purchased, equipped, and is operated without a cent from the 
State. 



STATE NORMAL SCHOOL 15 

11. Infirmary* 

The infirmary was built in 1916 as a result of the efforts of the 
Elijah Clarke Chapter of the Daughters of the American Revolu- 
tion, although the funds were furnished by this Chapter in co- 
operation with the General Assembly. 

12. Practice Home. 

This building was used as an infirmary until the new one was 
built in 1916. It was converted into the practice home where the 
students get practice in home making, thus putting into practice 
things studied in the class-room. 

13. Miller Hall. 

With an approprtion from the State this dormitory was com- 
pleted in 1917. This is a two-story structure and is modern in 
every respect. It is named in honor of Mr. B. S. Miller, President 
of the Board of Trustees. 

14. Pound Auditorium. 

This building was also finished in 1917, as an appropriation 
amounting to $100,000 from the State was sufficient to build Mil- 
ler Hall and the Pound Auditorium. It has an auditorium that 
will seat 2,500 people; as well as a number of class-rooms and 
offices. This auditorium is named for the President of the School. 



GENERAL CONDITIONS OF ADMISSION 

The purpose of this scshool is to "educate and train teachers for 
the common schools of Georgia.' The terms of admission are as 
follows: 

First: The applicant must be sufficiently mature and sufficiently 
well prepared to undertake the work of the school successfully. All 
students, when admitted are considered upon probation at all times; 
and, when unwilling or unable to do the work required, they will 
be privately counseled to withdraw. 

Second: This institution is a vocational school, not a reforma- 
tory. We have no punishments. All trifling with rules and regu- 
lations or careless, indifferent, and improper conduct will subject 
the offender to the necessity of withdrawing. Only students with 
a serious purpose are desired; and only such will be permitted to 
remain. Students in training are supposed to be mature enough 
to be responsible and our dealings are with them, not with their 
parents. 

Third: Good Moral Character. Every student will be required to 



16 STATE NORMAL SCHOOL 

hand to the President a letter of recommendation from some re- 
sponsible party in the home neighborhood. 

Fourth: Good Health. This school is delightfully situated in the 
Piedmont Hills. The conditions of health here cannot be surpassed. 
But in order to protect our students as carefully as possible we 
have always on duty nurses of the very highest training, whose 
business will be to constantly inspect the dormitories and to ex- 
amine all the students personally for all evidences of sickness and 
ill health. Moreover, all students are subjected to a rigid physical 
examination on arrival; and all defects noted are watched and the 
student is advised how they must best be removed. 

Fifth: Applicants for admission to the school must bring a letter 
from the home physician certifying that the applicant is in sound 
health and has not been exposed to any contagious disease within 
the previous thirty days. See (blank for this purpose, next to last 
page. This letter must be presented upon arrival. 

Sixth: Successful vaccination is also another absolutely neces- 
sary condition of entrance. All students upon arrival will have 
their arms examined by a physician; and if they do not have a satis- 
factory scar, they must be vaccinated at once before they can be 
admitted to the school. In all cases it is better for applicants to be 
vaccinated before coming here, provided it can be done with fresh, 
pure vaccine points. 

These last two conditions are so imperative, and will he adhered 
to so rigidly, that the applicant who neglects them will be neces- 
sarily subjected to great trouble in entering the school. Plainly 
and emphatically, these things must not be neglected by any appli- 
cant. 

Registering. 

Upon reaching the school, the student should go at once to the 
office of the Registrar and fill out a registration blank properly. 
This blank is then taken to the Dormitory Manager's office where a 
Dormitory Room Ticket will be obtained. All moneys and fees 
should at once be paid at this office and receipts secured for same. 

The Classification Committee will meet the students in various 
class-rooms for all assignments. A directory of where these com- 
mittees may be found will be posted in conspicuous places in the 
corridors of the academic buildings. In order to be properly classi- 
fied at once, the student should bring letter of introduction, health 
certificate, and all reports from former schools and teachers. 

Boarding Department. 

All dormitories are steam^heated, with toilet rooms and bath on 
every floor abundantly supplied with hot and cold water. They are 



STATE NORMAL SCHOOL 17 

comfortable, pleasant, and healthful homes for the students. All 
of our dormitories are the equal of the best dormitories in all mat- 
ters of convenience and comfort. Students in each dormitory are 
under the care of a resident matron, who looks after their needs and 
comforts. The dining hall is well equipped. 

Board in the dormitories includes room, table fare, heat, lights, 
and attendants for the rougher work. 

Each student will pay for, and look alter her own laundering, 
with the assistance of the matron in charge. 

Each student must bring a pillow, pillow-cases, bed-clothes (in- 
cluding at least one white spread), towels, hair-brush and comb, 
and other personal toilet articles; also a bath-robe, bed-room slip- 
pers, overshoes, wrap and umbrella. 

Each student should bring also one cup and saurcer, one dinner 
plate, one knife, fork and teaspoon, for personal use in the dormi- 
tories, when such things are necessary. It is against the rules 
for any student to carry out or borrow dishes and silver from the 
dining-room. 

Male students do not room in the dormitories. Rooms are rented 
for them near the campus and paid for by the school. Such stu- 
dents pay the same rate for board as outlined in the catalogue, 
furnishing bedding, etc., just as the girls do. 

Parents and friends visiting students cannot be accommodated 
in the dormitories, as there is no room for them. They can secure 
board in the city. 

Assignment of Rooms. 

Rooms are not assigned until the opening of school in the fall. 
This work cannot be done during the summer, except the rooms in 
the Winnie Davis Memorial Hall and these are secured through 
various Chapters of the Daughters of the Confederacy. Students 
that arrive on the first day of the opening of school have a better 
chance of securing rooms where they want them. 

Expenses. 

Terms for board (payable in advance, as indicated). 

Sept. 3rd, 1925 — First payment $ 37.50 

Nov. 5th, 1925 — Second payment :;7.50 

Jan. 20th, 1926 — Third payment 37.50 

Mar. 24th, 1926 — Fourth payment 37.50 

$150.00 
Matriculation fee (to be paid en entrance) 10.00 



18 STATE NORMAL SCHOOL 

Board for students who do not make the quarterly payments as 
indicated above, will be at the rate of $4.50 per week, $1.00 per 
day. 

AH students entering before September 15th, will be charged 
from date of opening (Sept. 2nd). Those entering on, and after 
Sept. 15th, will be charged from the date they enter school. 

No tuition is paid by Georgia students. Students from outside 
the State are required to pay $40.00 per year; $20.00 upon entrance, 
and $20.00 at the beginning of the second semester. 

If advisable at any time to raise or lower the rates for board or 
matriculation fee, the rights to do so is reserved. 

Money deposited on dormitory account will not be refunded. 

Money deposited on personal account may be withdrawn at any 
time. No part of the Matriculuation fee will be refunded for any 
reason. 

Checks for board or tuition should not be made payable to the 
President, but to the student. 

Students must supply their own text-books. Books will be fur- 
nished at publishers' prices with cost of handling added. A second- 
hand book-store is a'lso operated for the benefit of the students, 
who wish to buy or sell secondhand books. 

The school has a farm of 215 acres, which is well equipped to 
furnish supplies for the dining-room. 

Uniforms. 

To promote economy, simplicity, and good taste in dress, every 
young woman in the school, unless especially excused by the Presi- 
dent, is required to purchase and wear the uniform adopted by the 
school. Requests to be excused from wearing the uniform will not 
be considered except for very exceptional and unusual reasons. 

The uniform consists of the following articles: 

For church and street wear — a blue serge suit and cap, white 
waist, tan gloves, black shoes and hose. 

For class room wear — a blue serge suit skirt, uniform waist of 
white poplin, blue Windsor tie. 

For summer and evening wear — a white poplin wash skirt and 
white waist. 

The suit, cap, gloves, white skirts and tie may be ordered by mail 
before the student leaves home. Unless placed in advance, the order 
must be given immediately upon arrival at the school. The white 
waists for school, church, and evening wear must be made of the 
material and according to the patterns designated in the accom- 
panying leaflet giving detailed descriptions. 

The above requirements will be rigidly enforced. There must 



STATE NORMAL SCHOOL 19 

be no attempt at evasion or partial violation of these regulations. 
No other articles, however similar can be substituted for those 
specified. 

Students are expected to wear the uniform at all times both on 
and off the campus. They need not bring to the school dresses of 
other kinds, for it is desired that the uniform be worn on all oc- 
casions. This uniform is pronounced by all experts who have ex- 
amined it as the cheapest, neatest, completest and best uniform 
prescribed by any institution in the South. 

Uniforms must be kept in good condition. The enforcement of all 
regulations with regard to the uniform is within the authority of 
the matrons of the several dormitories. Students may be required 
to buy new garments whenever in the judgment of the President 
and the matrons it is deemed necessary. 

Students must not sell or give cast off uniform garments to per- 
sons living in the vicinity of Athens. 

The uniform skirt, cap, and white waist should be worn by for- 
mer students when returning to the school in September. All stu- 
dents must wear the uniform as a traveling dress at all other 
times. 

It is very desirable that uniforms be ordered before leaving 
home and worn when coming to Athens. A detailed description 
and order blank will be furnished upon request made to the 
Registrar. 



20 STATE NORMAL SCHOOL 

COURSES OF STUDY 

NORMAL, DIPLOMA (Academic) 

First Year Hours 

Education 1 — Psychology and 3 — 'Child Psychology 3 

Education 2 — Principles of Teaching 3 

English 1 — Rhetoric and 2 — Shakespeare 3 

Music — Public School Music l 1 /^ 

Manual Arts — Blackboard Illustration 1V 2 

Rural Social Science 1 — Rural Economics IVz 

Public Speaking 1 iy 2 

Physical Education 2 

Health 1 

Required 15 

Elect three hours from the following: 

History 1 — American Government Problems 3 

Mathematics 1 — Plane and Spherical Trigonometry 3 

Foreign Language: Latin 1, Horace and 2, Livy — French 1 

— Spanish 1 3 

Science 1 — Physics : 3 

Total 18 

Second Year 

Hours 
Education 4 — History of Education and 5 — iSchool Manage- 
ment and Supervision 3 

Education 6 — Practice Teaching and Conference 3 

English 3 — The Elements and Kinds of Literature 3 

Music — Public School Music IY2 

Agriculture 1 — Agronomy 1 *& 

Public Speaking 2 _ 1% 

Rural Social Science 2 — Rural Sociology 1% 

Physical Education 2 

Health 1 

Required 15 

Elect three hours from the following: 

History 2 — 'Contemporary American History 3 

Mathematics 2 — Elementary Analysis 3 

Foreign Language: Latin 3, Cornelius Nepos and 4, Ovid; 

French 2; Spanish 2 3 

Science 2 — Inorganic Chemistry 3 

Total 18 

NORMAL DIPLOMA (Household Arts) 
First Year 

Education 1 — Psychology and 3 — Child Psychology 3 

Education 2 — Principles of Teaching 3 

English 1 — Rhetoric and Shakespeare 3 

Science 2 — Inorganic Chemistry 3 

Household Arts 6 — Elementary Dressmaking 1^ 

Household Arts 1 — Food Study and Cookery 1% 



STATE NORMAL SCHOOL 21 

Household Arts 4 — Textiles IY2 

Manual Arts 2 — House Furnishing IY2 

Physical Education 2 

Health 1 

Total 18 

Second Year 

Education 6 — Practice Teaching and Conference 3 

English 3 — The Elements and Kinds of Literature 3 

Household Arts 10 — Physiology and Family Health IY2, 

Household Arts 11 — Nutrition 1% 

Household Arts 7 — Clothing and Pattern Design iy 2 

Household Arts 2 — Home Cookery and Table Service 1% 

Household Arts 13 — Home Management iy 2 

Household Arts 5 — Millinery — 1, and 15 — Special Methods in 

Teaching Household Arts — Vz \y 2 

Agriculture 5 — Poultry and 1, Agronomy 3 

Physical Education 2 

Health 1 

Total 18 

NORMAL DIPLOMA (Fine and Industrial Arts) 

First Year 

Hours 

English 1 — Rhetoric and 2 — Shakespeare 3 

Education 1 — Psychology and 3 — Child Psychology 3 

Education 2 — Principles of Teaching 3 

Chemistry 3 

Fine and Industrial Arts 1 — Drawing 1 iy 2 

Fine and Industrial Arts 2 — Home Furnishing iy 2 

Fine and Industrial Arts 6 — Wood Work 
Fine and Industrial Arts 16 — Clay Work 

1% 

Clothing \y 2 

Physical Education 2 

Health 1 

Required 18 

Second Year 

Education 6 — Practice Teaching and Conference 3 

English 3 — The Elements and Kinds of Literature 3 

Agriculture 1 — Agronomy 3 

Fine and Industrial Arts 4 — Drawing II \y 2 

Fine and Industrial Arts 5 — Art Structure I \y 2 

Fine and Industrial Arts 14 — Woodwork II 1^ 

Fine and Industrial Arts 7 — Book Binding 1% 

Fine and Industrial Arts 15 — Blackboard Illustration 1% 

Home Cookery and Table Service 1 *£ 

Required 18 



22 STATE NORMAL SCHOOL 

DEGREE COURSES 

A.B. EDUCATION 
Freshman 

Hours 

Education 1, Psychology and 3, Child Psychology 3 

Education 2, Principles of Teaching 3 

English 1, Rhetoric and 2, Shakespeare 3 

Public School Music and Public Speaking 3 

Physical Education 2 

Health 1 

Required 12 

Elect six hours from the following: 

History 1, American Governmental Problems 3 

Mathematics 1, Plane and Spherical Trigonometry 3 

Science, Physics 3 

Foreign Language: Latin 1 and 2, French 1, Spanish 1 3 

Total 18 

Sophomore 

Education 4, History of Education and 5, School Management 3 

Education 6, Practice Teaching and Conference 3 

English 3, The Elements and Kinds of Literature 3 

Public School Music and Public Speaking 3 

Physical Education 2 

Health 1 

Required 12 

Elect six hours from the following: 

History 2, Contemporary American History 3 

Mathematics 2, Elementary Analysis 3 

Foreign Language: Latin 3 and 4, French 2, Spanish 2 3 

Science 2, Inorganic Chemistry 3 

Total 18 

Junior 

Hours 
Education 14, Educational Psychology and 15, Tests and 

Measurements 3 

English 4, The Novel 3 

Required 6 

Elect nine hours from the following: 

Foreign Languages: Latin 6, Sallust and 7, Tacitus; French 3, 
Spanish 3 3 

History 3, Contemporary World History; Rural Social Science 
3, Economics 3 

Mathematics 3, College Algebra and 4, Analytic Geometry; 
Science 3, Botany; Agriculture 3, Horticulture and 4, Land- 
scape Gardening 3 

Public School Music; Public Speaking; Library Methods 3 

Physical Education; Health 3 

Total 15 



STATE NORMAL SCHOOL 23 

Senior 
Education 18, School Administration and 19, School Supervision 3 
English 5, The Drama 3 

Required 6 

Elect nine hours from the following: 

Foreign Language: Latin 8, Juvenal and 9, Lucretius, French 
4, Spanish 4 3 

History 4, Problems in World Politics; Rural Social Science 4, 
Sociology 3 

Mathematics 5, Differential and Integral Calculus; Science, 
Zoology; Agriculture 5, Poultry and 6, Commercial Geogra- 
phy 3 

Public School Music 3; Public Speaking 3; Library Methods 3 

Total 15 

B.S. EDUCATION (Household Arts) 
Freshman 

Education 1 — Psychology and 3 — Child Psychology 3 

English 1 — Rhetoric and 2 — Shakespeare 3 

Science 2 — Inorganic Chemistry 3 

Household Arts 6 — Elementary Dressmaking 1% 

Household Arts 1 — Food Study and Cookery 1% 

Household Arts 4 — Textiles 1% 

Public School Music 1*6 

Physical Education 2 

Health 1 

Required 15 

Elect three hours from the following: 

Manual Arts 1 — Drawing and 2 — House Furnishing 3 

Foreign Language: Latin 1 — Horace and 2 — Livy, French 1, 

Spanish 1 3 

Total 18 

Sophomore 

Education 2 — Principles of Teaching 3 

English 3 — The Elements and Kinds of Literature 3 

Science 1 — Physics 3 

Household Arts 7 — Clothing and Pattern Design \Vz 

Household Arts 2 — Home Cookery and Table Service 1% 

Household Arts 5 — Millinery 1, and Household Arts 15 — 

Special Methods in Teaching Household Arts Vz 1% 

Public School Music 1% 

Physical Education ' 2 

Health 1 

Required 15 

Elect three hours from the following: 

Agriculture 5 — Poultry and Agronomy 1 3 

Foreign Language: Latin 3 — and 4, French 2 — Spanish 2__3 

Total 18 



24- STATE NORMAL SCHOOL 

Junior 

Education 14 — Educational Psychology and 15 — Tests and 

Measurements 3 

Science 5 — Organic Chemistry 3 

Science 1 — Bacteriology 1^ 

Household Arts 10 — Psysiology and Family Health IY2 

Household Arts 8 — and 9 — Dress Design and Advanced Dress- 
making '_ 3 

Required 12 

Elect six hours from the following: 

Agriculture 3 — Horticulture and 4 — Landscape Gardening 3 

Rural Social Science 3 — Economics 3 

English 4 — The Novel 3 

Physical Education 3 

Public School Music 3 

Total 18 

Senior 

Education 6 — Practice Teaching and Conference 3 

Education 12, 13, 18 or 19 1% 

Household Arts 3 — Advanced Cookery 1% 

Household Arts 12 — Dietetics IY2 

Household Arts 17 — Economics of the Household IY2 

Household Arts 18 — Hygiene of Childhood and Adolescence 1% 

Science 6 — Physiological Chemistry \ x k 

Public Speaking 3 

Required 15 

Elect three hours from the following: 

Rural Social Science 4 — Sociology 3 

Science 1 — Zoology 3 

Agriculture 5 — Poultry and 6 — Commercial Geography 3 

Public School Music 3 

Total 18 

B.S. EDUCATION (Fine and Industrial Arts) 

Freshman 

Hours 

English 1 — Rhetoric and 2 — Shakespeare 3 

Education 1 — Psychology and 3 — Child Psychology 3 

Chemistry 3 

Fine and Industrial Arts 1 — Drawing I 1% 

Fine and Industrial Arts 2 — Home Furnishing 1% 

Fine and Industrial Arts 3 — Mechanical Drawing IVz 

Clothing 1V 2 

Physical Education 2 

Health 1 

Required . 15 



STATE NORMAL SCHOOL 25 

Elect three hours from the following: 

Foreign Language: Latin 1 and 2, French 1, Spanish 1 3 

Mathematics 1 — Plane and Spherical Trigonometry 3 

Public School Music IY2 

Public Speaking iy 2 

Rural Economics IY2 

Total 18 

Sophomore 

Hours 

English 3 — The Elements and Kinds of Literature 3 

Education 4 — History of Education and 5 — School Management 3 

Physics 3 

Fine and Industrial Arts 4 — Drawing II iy 2 

Fine and Industrial Arts 5 — Art Structure IY2 

Fine and Industrial Arts 6 and 7 — Woodwork and Book Binding iy 2 

Home Cookery and Table Service iy 2 

Physical Education 2 

Health 1 

Required 15 

Elect three hours from the following: 

Foreign Language: Latin 3 and 4, French 2, Spanish 2 3 

Rural Social Science 2 — Rural Sociology 1 y 2 

Mathematics 2 — Elementary Analysis 3 

Public Speaking 1 % 

Music iy 2 

Sociology iy 2 

Total 18 

Junior 

Hours 

Agriculture 3 — Horticulture and 4 — Landscape Gardening 3 

Education 14 — Educational Psychology and 15 — Tests and 

Measurements 3 

Fine and Industrial Arts 8 — Drawing III iy 2 

Fine and Industrial Arts 9 — Art Structure II iy 2 

Fine and Industrial Arts 10 — Art History iy 2 

Home Nursing and Physiology 1 y 2 

Physical Education 2 

Health 1 

Required 12 

Elect six hours from the following: 
Foreign Languages: Latin 6, Sallust arid 7, Tacitus; French 3; 

Spanish 3 3 

Science 3 

Mathematics 3 — College Algebra and 4 — Analytic Geometry-- 3 

English 4 — The Novel 3 

Public School Music iy 2 

Public Speaking iy 2 

Total 18 



2« STATE NORMAL SCHOOL 

Senior 

Hours 
Education 18 — School Administration and 19 — School Super- 
vision 3 

Hygiene C. & A. 1% 

Eco. of H. \Vz 

Fine and Industrial Arts 11 — Drawing IV 1% 

Fine and Industrial Arts 12 — Art Appreciation 1% 

Fine and Industrial Arts 13 — Architectural Drawing 1% 

Fine and Industrial Arts 17 — Art History II 1% 

Physical Education 2 

Health 1 

Required 12 

Elect six hours from the following: 
Foreign Language: Latin 8, Juvenal and 9, Lucretius; French 

4; Spanish 4 3 

Science 3 

Economics 3 

Mathematics 5 — Differential and Integral Calculus 3 

Public Speaking 3 

Public School Music 3 

English 5 — The Drama 3 

Total 18 



STATE NORMAL SCHOOL 27 

AGRICULTURE AND RURAL SOCIAL SCIENCE 



1. Agronomy. 

This course consists of a study of the various field crops that are 
commonly grown in the South. The composition, the races and 
varieties, breeding or improvement, fertilizers and the enemies of 
the different crops will be considered in relation to their importance. 
Laboratory work will be required. 

Three hours per week, one semester. Second year Diploma. 
Credit: 1V 2 hours. 

2. Animal Husbandry. 

The relation of farm animals to permanent agriculture, the prin- 
ciples involved in feeding, the importance of balanced rations to 
secure the proper developments of animals will be the foundation of 
this course. Later a detailed study will be made of the different 
breeds of cattle, swine, horses and poultry. One period per week 
will be devoted to laboratory work in the study of feeds, testing 
milk, working balanced rations and determining the profitableness 
of certain animals. 

Three hours per week, one semester. Second year Diploma. 
Credit: 1Y 2 hours. 

3. Horticulture. 

The propagation of plants, hot beds, cold frames and school and 
home gardening will form a basis for this course. In addition 
however, the control of various insects and diseases will be studied. 
Field trips and practical work will be required in order that the 
subject matter may become more vital and real. 

Three hours per week, one semester. Junior. Credit: 1% hours. 

4. Landscape Gardening. 

In this course a study will be made of the selection of flowers, 
shrubs and trees suitable for different types of homes and school 
-buildings. The proper arrangement and grouping of the plants 
will be emphasized. Rural school grounds will be taken up in 
detail. Drawings of school and home grounds will be required. 

Three hours per week, one semester. Junior. Credit: 1 ^ hours. 

5. Poultry. 

The breeds of poultry, the care and management, the proper feed- 
ing and the insects and diseases of poultry will form the basis for 
this course. Consideration will be given to the location and con- 
struction of poultry houses. 

Three hours per week, one semester. Senior. Credit: 1% hours. 



2 8 STATE NORMAL SCHOOL 

6. Commercial Geography. 

In this course a study will be made of physiography of the United 
States and the relation of man to natural conditions which includes 
the influences of the flora, the fauna topography and water. Em- 
phasis will be placed on the geography of trade, especially in the 
United States and the British Empire. 

Three hours per week, one semester. Senior. Credit: iy 2 hours. 

1. Rural Economics. 

This course takes up some of the most salient features of the 
rural proiblems with emphasis on the rural conditions in Georgia 
and their effects on rural social life. County and community reports 
are made. 

Three hours per week, one semester. First year Diploma. 
Credit: 1% hours. 

2. Rural Sociology. 

This course is designed to give an interest and appreciation in 
rural life and rural life problems with emphasis on present ten- 
dencies and future growth in Georgia. The United States Census 
reports, and all available state house reports, are used in connection 
with the text book. 

Three hours per week, one semester. Second year Diploma. 
Credit: 1V 2 hours. 

3. Economics. 

This course involves a study of the present economic conditions, 
and the necessity of improving these conditions. Economic develop- 
ment; the factors of production; rent and present-day rent problems; 
income; co-operation and credits; marketing; taxation and com- 
merce. 

Three hours per week throughout the year. Junior. Credit: 3 
hours. 

4. Sociology. 

This course takes up a study of the evolution of social condi- 
tions, the relation of physical environment to the several types of 
communities, economic and other causes which underlie changes in 
population, the present condition of communities, and existing 
social organizations, their functions, efficiency and present status. 
The influence of such factors as production, transportation, com- 
munication, land tenure, sanitation, and social, religious and edu- 
cational organizations upon the general welfare of communities, 
the improvement of such influence, and the use of the survey to 
ascertain social needs are topics which receive careful consideration. 



STATE NORMAL SCHOOL 29 

Three hours per week throughout the year. Senior. Credit: 3 
hours. 

EDUCATION 



1. Psychology. 

A course in Psychology from the point of view of educational 
theory and practice. A brief study is made of physiological psy- 
chology, followed by intensive work on the nature and function of 
the mental processes as revealed in human behavior. Through a 
study of perception, association, memory, imagination, reflective, 
thinking, reasoning, judging, attention, interest, feeling, emotion, 
instinct, habit, will and character, the student gains a better un- 
derstanding of the problems involved in the training of children. 

Reading Course Required: Thorndike; James; Dewey; Tichener; 
Angell; Judd; Munsterberg; Breese. 

Three hours per week, one semester. Freshman and First year 
Diploma. Credit: 1% hours. 

2. Principles of Teaching. 

The work in this class is intended to be both scientific and prac- 
tical. It is based on the laws of psychology and their use in the 
actual work of teaching. It makes use of modern scientific psy- 
chology and especially of recent investigations. The pupil is ex- 
pected to 'get practical control of principles by using them. He is 
expected to have his practices based on well understood reasons 
and to be able to modify his practices when occasion demands. 

References: Dewey, School and Society; James, Talks to Teach- 
ers on Psychology; Bolton's Principles of Education; Bagley, Edu- 
cational Values. 

Three hours per week for year. Freshman and First year Diplo- 
ma. Credit: 3 hours. 

3. Child Psychology. 

Attention is given to the foundation of child study in other sci- 
ences, and to the more general, permanent, and practical truths thus 
far revealed by students of children, particularly regarding their 
physical nature, growth, development, abnormalities and defects 
with methods of remedy; tests and measurements, meaning of in- 
fancy; periods of childhood; suggestion, habit, moral development, 
influences affecting personality. 

References: Kirkpatrick's Fundamentals of Child Study; Rowe's 
Physical Nature of the Child; King's Psychology of Childhood; 
Sully's Studies of Childhood; Hall's Adolescence; Tyler's Growth 
and Education. 



30 STATE NORMAL SCHOOL 

Three hours per week, one semester. Freshman and First year 
Diploma. Credit: iy 2 hours. 

4. History of Education. 

A study of the educational ideals, practices and tendencies of the 
past, the great educational reformers, and the principles derived 
from them, the origin and development of modern educational the- 
ory and practice. The course embraces a study of oriental, classi- 
cal, mediavel, and renaissance education, present tendencies in edu- 
cation, modern school systems, and the American public school. 
Reading course required. 

References: Parker's History of Modern Elementary Education, 
Hoyt's Studies in the History of Modern Education; Graves' Great 
Educators of Three Centuries. 

Three hours per week, one semester. Sophomore and Second 
year Diploma. Credit: IY2 hours. 

5. School Management and Supervision. 

This course undertakes to prepare the student to understand the 
various problems which will arise in connection with the school 
other than instruction. It deals with routine, daily program, at- 
tendance, hygiene conditions, discipline, incentives, coercives, 
records and grading and the teacher's relations to school officers and 
the community. 

References: Dutton, School Management; Foght, The American 
Rural School; Sears, Classroom Organization and Control. 

Three hours per week, one semester. Sophomore and Second 
year Diploma. Credit: iy 2 hours. 

6. Practice Teaching. 

The members of the Senior class are required to do practice teach- 
ing throughout the year in the various grades of the Training 
School and to co-operate in the work of the Rural School under 
the supervision and guidance of the head of the Department of 
Pedagogy and the Principal of the Training School, with the sym- 
pathetic and constructive criticism of skilled critic teachers. Before 
teaching, detailed lesson plans are prepared and submitted for 
criticism. 

Two hours per week throughout the year. Sophomore and Sec- 
ond year Diploma. Credit: 2 hours. 

7. Common School Review. 

Provision will be made to give a rapid review of the common 
school branches to those who need the review. 



STATE NORMAL SCHOOL 31 

8. Conferences. 

The officers of the Department of Pedagogy, the officers and teach- 
ers of the Training School, and all the members of the Senior class 
meet once a week for conference and discussion of the work of the 
Training Schools and vital educational problems in general. 

One hour per week throughout the year. Sophomore and Second 
year Diploma. Credit: 1 hour. 

9. Term Paper. 

Original investigation of some important phase of education, with 
a written report thereon, is required of members of the Senior 
class. 

10. School Law. 

A course of lectures on the salient provisions of the laws relating 
to the common school systems of the state. 
Special periods. Junior, Senior. 

11. Reading Course and Current Educational Literature. 

In addition to the regular course of study in this department, 
courses of reading are offered, based upon professional material at 
hand in the pedagogical department of the Carnegie Library of the 
State Normal School. A score or more of current educational peri- 
odicals coming to the Library form the basis of class conferences 
throughout the Junior and Senior years. 

Special periods. Junior, Senior. 

12. Principles of Secondary Education. 

This course is designed to give an intensive study of the modern 
problems in secondary education. It will include a study of the 
ultimate and proximate aims of high school education, selection and 
presentation of subject matter, plans for the economic use of the 
student's time, and classroom management. It will involve the 
psychology of high school subjects, type lessons, solution of prob- 
lems and practical work. 

Three hours per week, one semester. Senior Elective. Credit: 
iy 2 hours. 

18. General Methods of Teaching in High Schools. 

The course deals with the problems of classroom teaching. It is 
a general methods course for prospective high school teachers and 
supervisors. The following problems are treated: selection and ar- 
rangement of subject matter, economy in classroom management, 
teaching various subjects, individual differences, supervised study 



32 STATE NORMAL SCHOOL 

the use of books, laboratory methods, questioning, measuring the 
results of teaching. Reading and practical work required. 

Three hours per week, one semester. Senior. Credit: 1% 
hours. 

14. Educational Psychology. 

This course is designed to acquaint the student with the more im- 
portant laws and principles of psychology as they apply to the edu- 
cative process, and to give a survey of the experimental findings in 
the learning process. Among the topics considered will be: native 
tendencies, habit formation, memory and association, laws of learn- 
ing, individual differences, transfer of training, interference, fatigue 
and the mentally defective and the gifted children. 

Three hours per week, one semester. Junior. Credit: iy 2 
hours. 

15. Testing and Measurements. 

This course is planned to give a working knowledge of the more 
important standard tests for measuring the ability and achievement 
of elementary and high school children. Practice in administering 
tests and interpreting results will be an important part of this 
course. Special consideration will be given to the use of standard 
tests in diagnosing, classifying and evaluating the progress of 
children in various school subjects. Intelligence tests, readings, 
laboratory work. 

Three hours per week, one semester. Junior. Credit: 1% 
hours. Fee, $1.50. 

1G. Primary Methods and Supervision. 

This course is designed to benefit teachers of special classes, 
supervisors and principals. It includes (1) the theory and practice 
of teaching beginners; (2) an analysis and demonstration of the 
principal methods; (3) a resume of recent scientific investigation; 

(4) a sketch of the historical development of primary methods; 

(5) the specific qualities essential to success in this type of work. 
Three hours per week, one semester. Junior Course. Credit: 

l 1 /^ hours. 

17. Public School Curriculum. 

An intensive study is made otf the curriculum of the Elementary 
and Junior High Schools as they are related to social conditions and 
needs. This study includes: the historical development of the course 
of study; basic principles for the selection, grading, and organiza- 
tion of public school subjects; a comparative study of curriculums 
from different sections of the United States. Special emphasis is 



STATE NORMAL SCHOOL 3 3 

placed upon designing pupil activities to meet vocational, social, 
and civic needs. Practical work required. 

Three periods per week, one semester. Junior Elective. Credit: 
1 2 2 hours. 

18. City, State and County School Administration. 

This is a study of the principles underlying an efficient state school 
system, both city and county, with special reference to the present 
and future needs of Georgia. Topics studied will include: educa- 
tional surveys; the federal government in public education; school 
funds; school budgets; selection, preparation, certification and im- 
provement of teachers; school libraries; buildings and equipment; 
consolidation; compulsory attendance; free supplies; retardation; 
economy and efficiency. Field work and practical work required. 

Three hours per week, one semester. Senior. Credit 1% hours. 

19. School Supervision. 

The purpose of this course is the preparation of supervisors and 
supervising principles. This course considers the problems of the 
superintendents and principles in relation to attendance, organiza- 
tion, classification, marking systems, promotion plans, acceleration, 
retardation, elimination of pupils, records and reports. It will con- 
sider the function of the supervisor, methods of supervision and 
effective devices used by supervisors. Critimism and improvement 
of instruction and standards for judging instruction. Practical 
work. 

Three hours per week, one semester. Senior. Credit: iy 2 hours. 



TRAINING SCHOOL 



The Training School is a laboratory of the Normal School. It 
is a well organized department of Primary, Intermediate Junior 
and Senior High School pupils. 

This laboratory serves for teachers, Seniors and Juniors. The 
three distinct purposes of practice, demonstration and experimental 
teaching. 

Juniors are permitted to do observation in the Training School 
and Seniors are required to do four months of actual teaching before 
graduation. 

This work is very carefully supervised by the critic teachers in 
charge of the grades. 

Before any student is permitted to do practice teaching in the 
Training School, the equivalent of academic and professional work 



34 



STATE NORMAL SCHOOL 



as given in the Junior class of the State Normal School must be 
satisfactorily completed. 

The course of study in all the grades is in accordance with 
present progressive educational tendencies and is made in co-opera- 
tion with the Department of Education of the Normal School. The 
following is the course of study for the Junior and Senior High 
School. 

Outline of Work for Junior and Senior High School 
Seventh Eighth 
Required Required 
English __________5 English 5 



Math. (Arith.) 5 

Social Sciences: 

Geography ________ 5 

Amer. History ______ 5 

Science (Hygiene) _____ 5 

Music Appreciation _____ 2 

Physical Education _____ 2 

Sewing or Woodwork _ _ _ _ 2 



General Math. _______5 

Social Sciences: 

(English Hist.) _ _ _ _ 5 

(Community Civics) _ _ _ 5 
General Science ______ 5 

Music Appreciation _____ 2 

Physical Education _____ 2 

Cookery or Woodwork _ _ _ 2 

Elect one — 
Latin __________5 

Physical Geography _ _ _ 5 

Tenth 
Required 
English __________5 

Plane Geometry ______ 5 

Hist. Med. and Mod. _ _ _ _ 5 

Music Appr. ________ 

Phys. Ed. 2 

Elect One or Two 
Science (Chem.) ______ 5 

Latin 5 

Elect One or None 
Dom. Arts _________ 5 

Fine Arts 5 

Spanish 5 

French ___________ 5 

Eleventh 
Required 

English _ — 5 

S. Geom. and Adv. Alg. _ _ _ 5 
Hist. Amer. — _ — ____ 5 
Music Appr. ___ — _ — _ 1 

Phys. Ed. 2 

Elect One or Two 

Science (Phys.) 5 

Latin ____________ 5 

Elect One or None 
Dom. Arts _________5 

Fine Arts — 5 

Spanish __________5 

French ___________ 5 

No credit given for less than two years of any foreign language. 
No elective course given to less than five students. 
Advise continuation of elective throughout four years. 



Ninth 

Required 

English 5 

Algebra __________5 

Hist. Ancient ________ 5 

Music App. _________ 

Phys. Ed. 2 

Elect One or Two 
Science (Biol.) _______ 5 

Latin 5 

Elect One or None 
Dom. Arts _________ 5 

Fine Arts _________5 



STATE NORMAL SCHOOL 35 

THE RURAL SCHOOL 



It is our purpose with the model building and modern equipment 
to help in adjusting the rural school to the agricultural and domes- 
tic life of the country; to demonstrate ways in which a rural school 
may be the social center of community life; to adjust the course of 
study to rural conditions and interests; to study the problem of con- 
solidatoin of schools, to show what may be done by one teacher in 
carrying out a practical course of study; to bring the student-teach- 
ers of the State Normal School in close contact with the actual 
problems of the country school. A schedule is arranged by which 
they may observe the daily work of the school and have practical 
experience in teaching in a country school. 

ENGLISH 



1. Rhetoric and Theme Writing. 

A study of the principles of rhetoric and composition, of the con- 
struction of the short story, the news article, the letter of friend- 
ship and of business, enumerative and suggestive description, the 
expository essay, and the argument. All these forms will be writ- 
ten and criticised in class. 

Three hours per week for one semester. First year Diploma and 
Freshman. Credit: 1V 2 hours. 

2. Shakespeare. 

A careful study of Shakespeare's plays with attention to forma- 
tion of plot, character delineation, setting, and interpretation of 
thought. Frequent themes will be written and criticised in class. 

Three hours per week for one semester. First year Diploma and 
Freshman. Credit: iy 2 hours. 

3. Elements and Kinds of Literature. 

The entire year is given to a study of poetry, a book of selections 
from the works of the English poets being used as models. This 
study consists of an analysis of poetry, its elements, scansion, and 
varieties of forms. Occasional exercises in verse writing are used 
for fixing the poetic forms in mind. 

Three hours per week throughout the year. Second year Diploma 
and Sophomore. Credit: 3 hours. 

4. English Novel. 

In this course a study is made of the development of the novel 
from the earlier romances and the eighteenth century essay. Rep- 



3 6 STATE NORMAL SCHOOL 

resentative novels of Richardson, Fielding, Smollet, Austen, Scott, 
Dickens, Thackeray, George Eliot, Stephenson, Reade, Hardy, Kip- 
ling, Cooper, Hawthorne, and Howells, will be read outside of class 
and written reports made to the class from time to time. 

Three hours per week throughout the year. Junior. Credit: 3 
hours. '■■■. ""*s^ 

5. The Development of the Drama. 

This course includes a study of the History of the Drama: The 
Greek Drama, Latin Drama, French Drama, English Drama; Dra- 
matic Construction; Study of Masterpieces; Antigone; Everyman; 
Marlowe's plays; Ben Johnson's plays; The Rivals; The School for 
Scandal; She Stoops to Conquer; Modern Drama of the English 
School, the French iSchool, the German School, the Irish School, 
the Scandinavian School, the American School. 

Three hours per week throughout the year. Senior. Credit: 3 
hours. 

FINE AND INDUSTRIAL ARTS 



1. Drawing I. 

Outline and Mass Composition. Illustration. Still Life. Land- 
scape. Lettering. Posters. 

Three hours per week, one semester. Freshman and First year 
Diploma. Fee, $2.00. Credit: iy 2 hours. 

2. Home Furnishing. 

Art principles applied to home furnishing. Styles of furniture. 
Textiles, pictures and small articles in the home. Color and color 
schemes. Site. Floor plans. Styles of domestic architecture. 

Three hours per week, one semester. Freshman and First year 
Diploma. Fee, $2.00. Credit: 1V 2 hours. 

3. Mechanical Drawing. 

This is a study of the principles of the art of Mechanical draw- 
ing and the execution of a series of plates which illustrate these 
principles. The last portion of this course involves the making of 
blueprints. 

Three hours per week, one semester. Freshman. Fee, $2.00. 
Credit: iy 2 hours. 

4. Drawing II. 

Perspective. Flower, tree, fruit forms in original compositions. 
Still life. Landscape. Pose drawings. Color theory. 






STATE NORMAL SCHOOL 3 7 

Three hours per week, one semester. Sophomore and Second 
year Diploma. Fee, $2.00. Credit: 1% hours. 

5. Art Structure I. 

First principles of design. Illustrations in masterpieces of art 
studied. Original designs. Application. 

Three hours per week, one semester. Sophomore and Second 
year Diploma. Fee, $2.00. Credit: 1% hours. 

6. Woodwork. 

This is an introductory course in which different processes are 
demonstrated and executed as models or projects. 

Three hours per week, one-half of one semester. Sophomore. 
Fee, $2.00. Credit: 1% hours. 

7. Book Binding. 

This course gives the processes of case binding and library bind- 
ing. A study of the history of printing and book making is in- 
cluded. Problems in design will be one feature of this course. 

Three hours per week, one-half of one semester. Sophomore. 
Fee, $2.00. Credit: 1% hours. 

8. Drawing III. 

Advanced perspective. Interiors. Exteriors. Outdoor sketching. 
Artistic anatomy. Cast drawing. 

Three hours per week, one semester. Junior. Fee, $2.00. 
Credit: 1Y 2 hours. 

9. Art Structure II. 

More advanced work in original design. Application of princi- 
ples of design to original composition. 

Three hours per week, one semester. Junior. Fee, $2.00. 
Credit: 1 Y 2 hours. 

10. Art History I. 

The history of American Art, through lectures and required 
readings. 

Three hours per week, one semester. Junior. Fee, $2.00. 
Credit: iy 2 hours. 

11. Drawing TV. 

Advanced drawing and painting. Outdoor work. Figure drawing. 
Cast drawing. 

Three hours per week, one semester. Senior. Fee, $2.00. 
Credit: iy 2 hours. 



38 STATE NORMAL SCHOOL 

12. Art Appreciation. 

A study of pictures, sculpture, architecture and other works of 
art with a view to a development of appreciation for these things. 

Three hours per week, one semester. Senior. Credit: \y 2 
hours. 

iii. Architectural Drawing. 

The art of making plans and elevations, of preparing original 
drawings and of blueprinting is stressed throughout this course. 
The modern bungalo, which continues to arouse much interest in 
the minds of earnest home-makers, furnishes the architectural 
motive for this course. 

Three hours per week, one semester. Fee, $2.00 Credit: iy 2 
hours. 

HEALTH EDUCATION 



1. Principles of Health Education. 

An introductory course which presents the principles of healthy 
living, and the application of these principles to individual and 
community health. 

One hour a week, throughout the year. Freshman and First year 
Diploma. 

2. Health Teaching. 

This course deals with the program of Health Education from 
the standpoint of the teacher and includes a study of problems and 
methods. 

One hour a week, throughout the year. Sophomore and Second 
year Diploma. 

HISTORY 

1. American Governmental Problems. 

This course includes a study of: principles and functions of Gov- 
ernment; administrative organization in the United States; com- 
parison of Federal, State, and local forms; forms of citizenship 
and sovereignty in leading European states and America; methods 
of popular control and expression of public opinion; parties; nature 
and scope of financial and budgetary method; regulation of com- 
mercial and labor interests; problems of Government reforms. 
First semester. 

This course is applied workings of American government and 



STATE NORMAL SCHOOL 39 

citizenship, and includes development of co-operation; growth and 
application of ideals of liberty and law; principles of business and 
industry; city and country life; problems of union; international 
relations; American and other nations; government control of 
health and disease; labor and industry; water and food supply; 
charity, crime and correction; education. Second semester. 

Three hours per week. Freshman and First year Diploma. 
Credit: 3 hours. 

2. Contemporary American History. 

This course is based on a review of the nineteenth century of 
United States history; forming of the Federal Government; par- 
ties; the Westward movement; sectionalism; slavery; the Civil 
War; reconstruction; contemporary history and industrial era; 
growth of trusts and labor organizations; United States as a world 
power; international relations; banking, currency, and credit; the 
characteristic features of Americanism. 

Three hours per week throughout the year. Sophomore and 
Second year Diploma. Credit: 3 hours. 

3. Contemporary World History. 

This course will embrace a study of the causes and conduct of 
leadership in the great war; military and diplomatic causes; colo- 
nial conflicts in Africa; racial and political conflicts in the Balkans; 
balance of power, concert of Europe; German hegeanony and pan- 
German ideals; outbreak of war; modern methods of warfare; 
military movements on all fronts; origin and history of peace move- 
ments; past peace conferences, aims and results; peace negotia- 
tions; Paris-Versailles conference; claims; attempted political and 
economic settlements; treaties; League of Nations; disarmament 
conference; international relations. The course purposes to train 
the students in the proper interpretation of acts and events of our 
own times, to discover and understand history in daily newspapers 
and periodicals, and to form logical and clear conclusions. 

Three hours per week throughout the year. Junior. Credit: 3 
hours. 

4. Problems in World Politics. 

Development of state governments; internal and international 
problems of government; international law; nationalism; : and 
world policies. Political intrigues and alignments of the Great 
Powers in war, and in peace. Alliances; diplomacy; international 
conferences; and treaties. Colonial and imperial problems. Work 
of the organization and the League of Nations. 

This course aims to guide the students to a clear grasp of present 



40 STATE NORMAL SCHOOL 

national and international relations and policies. Documents and 
treaties must be studied and interpreted and reported on in writ- 
ing. The student will be urged to use the nest current publications 
available in libraries. 

Three hours per week. Seniors. Credit: 3 hours. 

HOUSEHOLD ARTS 



Uniforms of Cookery Classes: 

Every girl taking cookery is required to have at least three all 
white aprons, two hand towels three-fourths of a yard long, and 
two navy blue or white denim pot holders six inches square. The 
aprons must be made according to Designer Pattern no 704 6 with 
the addition of large pockets. The material should be of good 
weight — cotton sheeting as "Fruit of the Loom," "Cabat cotton," 
"Dovenshire," "Normandy Linen" or "Indian Head." The apron 
should be made even with the length of the skirt of the wearer. 

These articles should be made and brought from home ready for 
use at the (beginning of the term. 

COOKERY AND NUTRITION 



1. Food Study and Cookery. 

The subject matter of this course will deal with the source, com- 
position, selection, preparation and cookery of typical foods used in 
the home and in the teaching of elementary cookery. It will also 
deal with the application of the general principles of cookery to a 
wide range of food materials. 

This course is fundamental for all teachers of cookery. 

Three laboratory periods per week, first semester. Credit: 1 V 2 
hours. Fee, $4.00. 

2. Home Cookery and Table Service. 

The purpose of this course is the application of the general 
principles of cookery to the preparation of menus and meals for 
the home. It also includes the study and execution of different 
forms of table service as applied to different types and meals and 
special occasions. Practical problems are provided for the plan- 
ning, purchasing, preparation and serving of food for groups under 
pressure of economy of time, money and effort. 

Three laboratory periods per week, second semester. Prerequi- 
site: Home Economics 1. Credit: 1V 2 hours. Fee, $6.00. 



STATE NORMAL SCHOOL 41 

3. Advanced Cookery. 

Complex processes of cookery and Demonstration Cookery. Also 
special study of management problems in quantity cookery for tea 
rooms, school and college lunch rooms, hospital dietary depart- 
ments and in other types of food service for large groups. Oppor- 
tunity for students who desire to obtain practice in giving special 
demonstration in various phases of scientific cookery. 

Prerequisite: Chemsitry and Cookery 1 and 2. Two laboratory 
periods and one recitation. Credit: IY2 hours. Fee, $6.00. 

10. Physiology and Family Health. 

This course deals with the structure and function of the human 
organs of digestion, absorption, circulation, respiration, metablism, 
and excretion, etc., and their relation to human nutrition and pub- 
lic hygiene. Practical lessons in home nursing are included. 

Three hours per week, first semester. 

11. Nutrition. 

This course presents the fundamental principles of human nutri- 
tion and their application to the feeding of individuals, families 
and school groups under varying physiological and economic con- 
ditions. Special emphasis is placed upon the proper diet for in- 
fants and young children. The selection of subject matter, the 
adaption of material and methods of presentation for elementary 
and high school pupils are discussed. 

Three hours per week, second semester. Prerequisite: General 
Chemistry, Home Economics 1, 2, and 10. 

12. Dietetics. 

This course deals with the requirements of the individual 
throughout infancy, childhood, adolescence, adult life and old age, 
in the light of the chemistry and physiology of digestion; the energy 
value of food, the nutrition properties of proteins, fats, carbohy- 
drates, ash constituents and vitamins. Typical diatetics are planned 
for each period, and the problem of satisfying diverse requirements 
in families and other groups is considered, with special regard to 
economical and social conditions. 

Prerequisite: Organic Chemistry and Home Economics 1, 2, and 
10. 



ATE NORMAL SCHOOL 

TEXTILES AND CLOTHING GROUP 



6. Elementary Dressmaking. 

tree ::;;;-.::t> the fundamental processes of elem 
I: a placed on selection of materials with relation 

to design, utility, durability, and cost; and the care and repair of 
Simple garments are made for which both drafted and 
commercial patterns are used. Good technique and high standards 
:anship are stressed. 
7 - periods per week, first semester. Credit: 1*4 

'.-. :\::- 7,: >- 

7. Clothing and Pattern Designing. 

- course includes specific problems which embrace the funda- 
mental principles involved in the selection and design of dothing, 
ry and use of colors, pattern making and clothing con- 
:or different type figures. 
Three laboratory periods per week, second semester. Credit: 
: -_ h its Fee, $2.00. Prerequisite: 6. 

4. T«xn; - 

rids ionrac comprises the history and development of textiles, 
the study of fibers, and the identification of fabrics; with empi: 
on those points which affect the appearance, wearing qualities, 
:: materials. Correlation of subject matter is made 
- - - jeet« 

>ne semester. Credit: 1 % hours. 

5. Mi 

g of becoming shapes and styles for differer. mak- 

- and covering wire and solid frames, designing and placing of 

:are and renovation of materials, and remodeling of 

:hing of millinery are included. 

iratory periods per week, one semester. Credit: 1 hour. 

- 5 

§ A] '.• I Di en Di -ign. 

individual and social conditions which have in- 

?n of costumes in different countries; a study of 

fan r.ciples of composition, line, dark and light, and 

rmony, and problems involving the use of these principles. 

moratory periods per week, one semester. Credit: 1% 
Prerequisite: Home Economics 6 and 7. 



STATE NORMAL SCHOOL 43 

9. Advanced Dressmaking. 

course includes practice in draping and modeling c: 
gns. ?: : ork developed largely in muslin and t 

paper. Final problem will be an afternoon Bmphai 

1 on clothing methods for the high school. 
Three laboratory periods per week -eeond semester. Prerequi- 
site: Home Economic- 5. Credit: 1% hours V -- \1 

HOUSEHOLD ARTS EDUCATION AND ADMINISTRATION 



15. Household Arts Education — Unit Courses in Household Arts. 
For Junior or Senior Academic Students 
The subject matter of this cours- usisfl : U, s'-ort 

in the various phases of Home-Making and will be taugh: 
alists in the department. The aim of the course will be to 
the girl toward more efficient living trough contact with those 
which have direct bearing on the life and administration of 
the home. 

Three hours ek throughout the year. Credit: 3 hoi 

14. School Lunch and Nutrition. 

This course include- the study of individual food requirement 
of children in relation to personal and community health. L 

tory work includes the plann - -raration. and serving of 
sue iaJ liets, based on scientific nutrition studies, :o ehildre: 

ning School, and to thers nneeted th :he school when 
ial arrangements are ma I 
Student ? this lurse will be given one and oi- in 

credit ;.ce of one-half the required hour- 

:.ing. 

Lester. Prerequi- — neral 

:::e Economics 11. Nutrition or Home 
E : comics 12. Die:e:. - 

13. Hum*- tffanagi irii (Diploma I oudtsm 

- course is designed 1 g :ual pr: 

experience and skill in the organization and management o: 
home, t I :he student, and I 

and standar . gists 

on problems :^use adir. Brery Home 

nomics -tudent receiving a diploma or a I g Is requirr 

live in the house at least thi: 

ne seme- : "- _ 



44 STATE NORMAL SCHOOL 

15. Special Methods in Teaching Home Economics. 

A professional course consisting of lectures and class discussions 
designed to meet the needs of students majoring in Home Eco- 
nomics. A general survey is made including the study of the 
history, of organization, and promotion of Home Economics and its 
articulation of subject matter, courses of study and equipment for 
special types of schools. Special stress is made upon the needs of 
the school and community groups. 

One recitation per week, one semester. Credit: y 2 hour. 

17. Economics of the Household. 

(Open to Senior Academic Students). 

This course presents the economic and social problems of house- 
keeping and home-making. It deals with the orginazition and 
control of family and personal life through the economic relations 
of the household. The family income and the regulation of ex- 
penditures, standards of efficient living and methods of saving, etc., 
are included. 

Required of B.S. Seniors, with practical application in living in 
the Practice Home for 30 days. 

Three hours per week, first semester. 

18. Hygiene of Childhood and Adolescence. 

(Open to Senior Academic Students). 

This course presents a ibrief review of heredity and prenatal in- 
fluence; consideration of eugenics; application of biologic principles 
in the care of infancy and childhood and the relation of physical 
welfare to other values in the life of a child. It includes the sig- 
nificance and value of the lengthened period of immaturity in the 
human species; adolescent development with normal and abnormal 
characteristics; and education for parenthood involving sex-hygiene 
and sex-education with other factors. 

Three hours per week, second semester. Credit: iy 2 hours. 

LATIN 



1. Horace. 

Selections from the Odes, Satires and Epistles. Papers are re- 
quired on the Augustan Period, Roman customs and social life. 

Three hours per week throughout the first semester. Freshman 
or First year Diploma. Credit: 1% hours. 



STATE NORMAL SCHOOL 45 

2. Livy. 

Selections from Livy. 

Three hours per week throughout the second semester. Fresh- 
man or First year Diploma. Credit: iy 2 hours. 

3. Cornelius Xepos. 

Three hours per week throughout the first semester. Sophomore 
or Second year Diploma. Credit: 1% hours. 

4. Ovid. 

Selections from the Metamosphoses and Tristia. This course in- 
cludes a study of the most important classic myths. 

Three hours per week throughout the second semester. Sopho- 
more or Second year Diploma. Credit: 1V 2 hours. 

5. Teachers Course. 

Pronunciation, forms, syntax, prosody, the art of translating, 
methods of instructions, texts. 

Prerequisite: Latin 3 and 4. 

Three hours per week, one semester. Electives for Juniors and 
Seniors. 

6. Sallust. 

Three hours per week throughout the first semester. Junior. 
CrPdit: 1% hours. 

7. Tacitus, Agricola and Germania. 

This course includes a study of life in wester nand central Europe 
in Roman times. 

Three hours per week throughout the second semester. Junior. 
Credit: 1% hours. 

8. Juvenal: Satires. 

Three hours per week throughout the first semester. Senior. 
Credit: 1V 2 hours. 

9. Lucretius: De Reruni Xatura. 

Three hours per week throughout the second semester. Senior. 
Credit: 1 y 2 hours. 

Latin 1, 2, 3, 4, or their equivalent required as prerequisite for 
the last four courses. 



46 STATE NORMAL SCHOOL 

LIBRARY METHODS 



This course will include a study of the classification and cata- 
logue of the Normal School Library, the uses of encyclopedias, in- 
dexes to periodical literature and general reference books during 
the fall term. The spring term will include the organization of a 
school library, simple methods of accessioning, classifying and cat- 
aloguing, selection and buying of books. 

Three hours per week throughout the year. Junior or Senior. 
Credit: 3 hours. 

MATHEMATICS 



1. Plane and Spherical Trigonometry. 

This subject will deal with trigonometric functions of an acute 
angle and the use of natural functions and logorithms in the solu- 
tion of the right triangle; functions of any angle and the sum or 
difference of two angles; triginometric equations; the oblique 
triangle; applications in exercises and prohlems; the right spehrical 
triangle and applications. Should time permit, the course will in- 
clude original problems based on angle measurements made by the 
student. 

Three hours per week throughout the year. Freshman and First 
year Diploma. Credit: 3 hours. 

2. Elementary Analysis. 

This course consists of one semester's work in elementary analytic 
geometry, and one in elementary calculus. 

The analytic geometry embraces co-ordinate systems; the curve 
and the equation; the straight line and the circle; curve plotting; 
functions and graphs; common and natural logarithms; problems, 
etc. 

The calculus includes differentiation; slope, tangent and normal; 
maxima and minima; rates; differentials; applications; a brief 
study of integration with examples and applications to rates, areas 
and volumes. 

Three hours per week throughout the year. Sophomore and Sec- 
ond year Diploma. Credit: 3 hours. 

3. College Algebra. 

This course will embrace quadratic, irrational, and higher equa- 
tions; ratio, proportion, and variation; the progressions; the bino- 
mial theorem; permutations and combinations; limits; infinite se- 



STATE NORMAL SCHOOL 47 

ries; exponential and logarithmic series; determinants; and the 
theory of equations. 

Three hours per week, one semester. Junior. Credit: 1% 
hours. 

4. Analytic Geometry. 

A more advanced course than that given in 2. In addition to 
the topics treated in 2, this course will include polar co-ordinates; 
the transformation of co-ordinates; the properties of the parabola, 
ellipse, and hyperbola; tangents and normals; and the analytic 
geometry of space. 

Three hours per week, on semester. Junior. Credit: 1V 2 hours. 

5. Differential and Integral Calculus. 

In this course a careful study will be made of differentiation, 
limits, analytic and geometric applications, curvature, application 
of the derivative in mechanics, curve tracing in Cartesian and polar 
co-ordinates. 

The work in the integral calculus will embrace the indefinite 
integral; the definite integral; formulas for integration; natural 
and irrational fractions; binomial differentials; trigonometric and 
definite integrals; series; geometric applications; differential equa- 
tions; mechanical applications. 

Three hours per week throughout the year. Senior. Credit: 3 
hours. 

MUSIC 



1. Public School Music. 

The teaching of sight reading and the fundamentals of the theory 
involved is the aim of the work of this year. The first part of the 
year's work is devoted to correct singing tone and the reading of 
simple one part melodies. Later, two part and three part music 
is taken. During both Junior and Senior years all are encouraged 
to collect material of current musical events. Occasional four 
minute talks and illustrations on subjects relative to increasing 
appreciation and understanding of the best music and composers 
varies the usual and the more technical .character of the class 
work. 

Three hours per week, one semester. Junior. Credit: iy 2 hours. 

2. Public School Music. 

Application of correct teaching methods of music to children is 
the main purpose of this year's work. A general consideration of 
problems in music encountered by the ordinary grade teacher is 



4 8 STATE NORMAL SCHOOL 

made with a view of a complete survey of the attainments in a 
course of study expected for each grade as a standard of accom- 
plishment. The child voice and help for the vocally deficient is 
studied and song material acquired. Work in more advanced sight 
reading is continued. The privilege of electing music for a practise 
teaching subject and observation of lessons taught in the Elementary 
Practice School is a great aid in this year's work. 

Three hours per week, one semester. Senior. Credit: 1V 2 hours. 

3. Public School Music. 

Advanced sight reading; methods for primary and intermediate 
grades including the explicit problems of each grade, song material 
and appreciation of listening lessons. A course of study by the 
year, months and weeks with material used is made for each grade. 
Organization and conducting of school bands and orchestras is also 
given. 

Three hours per week throughout the year. Junior Degree 
Course. Credit: 3 hours. 

4. Public School Music. 

Advanced sight reading and fundamentals of harmony. Methods 
for the upper grammar grades and high school with the accompany- 
ing detailed course of study and explicit material to foe used in each 
grade is studied. Type demonstration lessons suitable for the use 
of supervisors in instruction of grade teachers are also planned. 
Principles involved in choral work and their direction are applied 
practically in the Senior chorus organization as described elsewhere. 
This disposition of changing boys' and girls' voices and other char- 
acteristics of adolescence as hearing on the music course of those 
grades is a matter of particular importance and receives the study 
due it as such. 

Three hours per week throughout the year. Senior Degree 
Course. Credit: 3 hours. 

5. Senior Chorus. 

The entire Senior class is organized for chorus at which practical 
application is made of methods for conducting community singing 
or grade and high school chorus songs. The chorus affords an ex- 
cellent opportunity for those studying public school music with an 
idea of specialization to have a laboratory for experiment and 
practice in choral work. This is found of invaluable aid as the 
teachers of today are expected to take active community interests 
outside the school or in it as community center. One formal con- 
cert is given annually by the chorus which includes selections from 
the best classics. 



STATE NORMAL SCHOOL 49 

Piano. 

Realizing the demands for better equipped Instrumental Music 
Teachers, the State Normal School has added Special Normal Course, 
the object of which is to fit the student (at very littJe cost) to teach 
Instrumental Music. 

Students are not only required to be acquainted with the repre- 
sentative works of the best composers, but must study the theory of 
music, harmony, history and pedagogy, and be able to analyze and 
criticise a musical composition intelligently. 

The standard has been raised, the course carefully planned, and 
the department is well qualified to carry on the work. The advan- 
tages are equal to any music school in the south. 

Students are graded and classified according to their technical 
skill, and their general musical knowledge. They are required to 
bring with them a complete list of studies and pieces, that they 
may be given credit for same. 

Especial attention is given to ensemble playing. The year is 
divided into four terms, nine weeks each. Tuition payable in ad- 
vance at time dormitory fee is due. Piano practice included. Tui- 
tion when once paid will not be refunded. 

Piano, two hours each week, $12.75 per term. 

Harmony, two hours each week, $9.00 per term. 

Voice. 

This course is divided into four terms of nine weeks each. A 
small fee of $12.75 per term is charged. This includes use of piano 
for practice. This takes up the proper placing of the voice, breath 
control, relaxation, phrasing, and song interpretation. Songs of 
the best known composers and study of arias of well known operas 
will be studied. 

Violin. 

Instruction in violin consists of a graded course embracing ele- 
mentary exercises and studies by Hohmann, Wolfhart, and others, 
progressing through Kayser, Books I and II, Mazas, Kreutzer, 
Schradieck Scale Studies Rode, Fiorillo Gavinies and others, with 
pieces by classic and modern composers, according to the proficiency 
of pupil. A candidate for diploma in violin must have studied 
Kreutzer and Rode, and some of the easier concertos and sonatos, 
have a reasonable repertoire of solos suitable for recital purposes, 
and be able to play easy accompaniments on the piano. Require- 
ments for Harmony, History of Music and Ensemble are the same 
as in piano. Post graduate courses will be given on application. 



50 STATE NORMAL SCHOOL 

ORATORY 



The course in Oratory are designed to develop the students in the 
art of expression through gesture, speech and presence, with the 
special idea of helping those who are to become teachers. 

The methods employed overcome the effects of repression, stim- 
ulat free endeavor, increase "the joy of the working" and develop 
creative power. Each student is trained to express herself in many 
ways — in story telling, in dramatic personations, in oral composi- 
tion, in platform reading and in literary interpretation. The student 
is taught to think and feel before an audience and to express these 
thoughts and emotions through her own individuality. 

This results in a natural style, cultivates and refines literary taste, 
strengthens the imagination and develops personal power. Any 
student will find this study invaluable in teaching any other sub- 
ject, because oratory tends to bring poise, freedom from self-con- 
sciousness, a responsive voice and body, a keener imagination, emo- 
tions aroused and directed to the expression of the best in one's 
nature. The following courses are offered to those desiring special 
study in Oratory, and will be given in one private lesson and three 
class lessons per week. The work is designed to cover a period of 
two years of study. 

A certificate in Oratory will be given to students completing the 
courses as outlined below and also the following subjects: Psychol- 
ogy; History of Education; Principles of Education; Methods; Eng- 
lish; Junior Literature; Psychology; Modern Language; Common 
School Music; Art History; Physical Culture. 

A fee of $9.00 for nine weeks will be charged students of this 
department. 

1. Literary Interpretation. 

This course involves Evolution of Expression or the fundamental 
principles through which a student develops her powers of expres- 
sion; selections from literature; platform deportment; reticals. 

One hour per week throughout the year. Junior. 

2. Vocal Technique. 

This course deals with articulation: phonetics, speech formation, 
pronunciation, impediments of speech; technique; study and use of 
voice instrument, control of breath, resonance, flexibility, power, 
freedom; expressive voice culture; tone language, exercises empha- 
sizing the cultivation of the imagination to produce strong, brilliant 
and expressive voices. 

One hour per week throughout the year. Junior. 



STATE NORMAL SCHOOL 51 

3. Bodily Expression. 

The aim of Bodily Expression is to train the body to become the 
free responsive agent of the soul's expression. The course deals 
with physiology and psychology of gesture; harmony of action — 
hand exercises; pantomime. 

One hour per week throughout the year. Junior. 

4. Educational Dramatics. 

The great dynamic force, the drama, plays such an important part 
today in the development of the child that serious thought must be 
given to it. We believe, with President Eliot of Harvard, that dra- 
matic instinct is a tremendous power over children that ought to be 
utilized for their good. It is the purpose of this course to give the 
student a working knowledge of directing children's plays. Plays 
are studied from the view of a reading lesson to the actual public 
presentation. Several Seniors during the year will have complete 
direction of a play, training children of the Elementary School. 
This includes planning and making of scenery and costumes. 

One hour per week throughout the year. Senior. 

5. Story-telling. 

The most universal method of imparting knowledge and of im- 
pressing moral and spiritual truths is through story-telling. Here 
all knowledge of child psychology is applied and students become 
familiar with every type of story. A "Story Hour" is conducted by 
Oratory students every Monday. 

One hour per week throughout the year. Senior. 

6. Advanced Interpretation. 

This course involves a study of one act plays, the short story, 
and modern poetry. Recitals are given. 

One hour per week throughout the year. Senior. 

PHYSICAL EDUCATION 



1. Physical Education. 

This course includes fundamentals in tactics, free exercises, cor- 
rective work, light apparatus, folk dancing and games. 
Required of all Freshman or First year Diploma. 
Two hours per week throughout the year. 

2. Physical Education. 

Continuation of work started in Freshman year. Theory and 
practice in games and dances suitable for elementary and grammar 



52 STATE NORMAL SCHOOL 

grades. A fund of material for teaching purposes is collected and 
a special study made of the health manual prescribed by the State 
Board of Education. 

Required of all Sophomore or iSecond year Diploma. 

Two hours per week throughout the year. 

3. Physical Education. 

This course includes work in the theory and practice of physical 
education. A study is made of the different systems of gymnastics 
and stress placed upon special methods of teaching physical edu- 
cation. It also includes corrective work, advanced appartus, danc- 
ing and games. 

Three hours per week throughout the year. Junior and Senior. 
1 2 /2 hours credit per year for two years. 

4. Athletics. 

The work of this department includes, in addition to the regular 
gymnastics, careful instruction in outdoor games and sports. A 
well equipped athletic field is provided for the use of the students. 
A number of Field Days are given during each year, and the victo- 
rious class is awarded the possession of a beautiful loving cup. 

Gymnasium Suit. 

The gymnasium suit adopted by the school consists of white middy 
blouse, black bloomers and black tennis slippers. These articles are 
part of the school uniform and must be purchased after reaching 
Athens. 

PUBLIC SPEAKING 



1. Public Speaking. 

This course includes lessons in articulation which involves free- 
dom of organs of speech; placement; accurate moulding of the ele- 
ments of speech; pronunciation; also vocal technique which means 
breath control; development of resonance; placing of tones; purity, 
tone, projection, flexibility; compass; smoothness; power, and bril- 
liancy of tones; freedom. Evolution of expression is the basal 
text. 

Three hours per week, one semester. Freshman or First year 
Diploma. Credit: 1V 2 hours. 

2. Public Speaking. 

To some extent, time during this course must be given to meth- 
ods, in order to prepare the students for teaching. This part of the 
work will consist in methods for Primary and Grammar grades, and 



STATE NORMAL SCHOOL 53 

will include lectures, discussions, and practical illustrative exercises. 
Some of the phases of reading studied are: the relation of reading 
to other studies in the curriculum; methods of getting good reading; 
enunciation and pronunciation; phonics; pitch, inflection, modula- 
tion, model work; the development lesson; conduct of the reading 
lesson; emphasis of the importance of good oral reading on the 
part of the teacher. 

Three hours per week, one semester. Sophomore or Second year 
Diploma. Credit: IY2 hours. 

3. Public Speaking. 

The work in this course will consist in: Whatever pertains to 
preparing and delivering one's own speeches. Interpretation of 
great speeches, to train practical public speakers. A comprehensive 
study in principles, using masterpieces of oratory, and illustrative 
matter from current affairs, politics, reforms, advertisement, and 
any other subjects of interest. Impromptu and prepared speeches. 
Each student must select a major topic on which he will write 
several speeches. Each student will be required to prepare and le- 
liver lectures on specified teaching problems or subjcts. 

Three hours per week throughout the year. Junior or Senior 
Course. Credit: 3 hours. 



ROMANCE LANGUAGES 



1. French. 

Optional with Latin and Spanish for State Normal School diploma. 
A course for beginners which consists of careful drill in pronuncia- 
tion, translation, conversation, dictation and the reading of easy 
French texts. No prerequisite. 

Three hours per week throughout the year. Freshman and First 
year Diploma. Credit: 3 hours. 

2. French. 

Optional with Latin and Spanish for State Normal School diploma. 
Prerequisite: French 1 or its equivalent. This course is a contoinua- 
tion of French 1. It consists of a thorough review of grammar and 
syntax, constant practice in translating English into French, con- 
versation and extensive reading. 

Three hours per week throughout the year. Sophomore and Sec- 
ond year Diploma. Credit: 3 hours. 



54 STATE NORMAL SCHOOL 

3. French. 

Optional to students who have had French 2 or its equivalent. 
This course consists of advanced work in French. Extensive read- 
ing in and out of the class room. Explanation of texts. Rhetoric, 
compositions and essays in French. Conversation, lectures in 
French on literary topics. 

Three hours per week throughout the year. Junior. Credit: 
3 hours. 

4. French. 

Prerequisite: French 3 or its equivalent. This is especially a 
course of practice in teaching and is open to students who have 
had the three courses as outlined above, or their equivalent. Of 
the three hours scheduled, two will be given to practice in teaching 
and the other to lectures in French by the Professor. Besides, ex- 
tensive outside reading and reports in French on the books read 
will be required. 

French 3 and French 4 will be required for a Baccalaureate de- 
gree of the State Normal School, if French is elected. 

Three hours per week. Senior. Credit: 3 hours. 

1. Spanish. 

Optional with Latin and French for State Normal School diploma. 
A course for beginners which consists of careful drill in pronuncia- 
tion, translation, conversation, dictation and the reading of easy 
Spanish texts. No prerequisite. 

Three hours per week throughout the year. Freshman and First 
year Diploma. Credit: 3 hours. 

2. Spanish. 

Optional with Latin and French for State Normal School diploma, 
Prerequisite: Spanish 1 or its equivalent. This course is a con- 
tinuation of Spanish 1. It consists of a thorough review of gram- 
mar and syntax, contant practice in translating English into Span- 
ish, conversation and extensive reading. 

Three hours per week throughout the year. Sophomore and Sec- 
ond year Diploma. Credit: 3 hours. 

3. Spanish. 

Optional to students who have had Spanish 2 or its equivalent. 
This course consists of advanced work in Spanish. Extensive read- 
ing in and out of the class room. Explanation of texts. Rhetoric, 
compositions and essays in Spanish. Conversation, lectures in 
Spanish on literary topics. 



STATE NORMAL SCHOOL 5 5 

Three hours per week throughout the year. Junior. Credit: 
3 hours. 

4. Spanish. 

Prerequisite: Spanish 3 or its equivalent. This is especially a 
course of practice in teaching and is open only to students who have 
had the three courses as outlined above, or their equivalent. Of 
the three hours scheduled, two will be given to practice in teaching 
and the other lectures in Spanish by the Professor. Besides, ex- 
tensive outside reading and reports in Spanish on the books read 
will be required. 

Spanish 3 and Spanish 4 will be required for a Baccalaureat de- 
gree of the State Normal School, if Spanish is elected. 

Three hours per week throughout the year. Senior. Credit: 
3 hours. 

SCIENCE 



1. Physics. 

A study of Force and Energy and their relations to Matter; how 
they are applied in present day civilization. The fundamental prin- 
ciples of mechanics; the laws of gravitation, sound, light, heat, 
magnetism, electricity and methods of use. Laboratory of in- 
teresting and instructive nature. 

Three hours per week throughout the year. Freshman and First 
year Diploma. Credit: 3 hours. Fee, $3.00. 

2. Inorganic Chemistry. 

A study of the Elements and Compounds more especially indust- 
rial in their nature and applications. Chemical theory and calcu- 
lations, problems and processes. How chemical force combines 
elements into compounds and how these are made serviceable to 
man. How progress is depnedent upon chemical advancement; 
relation to war and peace and conserves the best interests of our 
race. Extensive laboratory work. 

Three hours per week throughout the year. Sophomore and Sec- 
ond year Diploma. Credit: 3 hours. Fee, $3.00. 

3. Botany. 

Plant life in relation to environment; structure and function of 
organs. Propagation, classification and identification of plants. 
Reactions to influences and forces playing upon the plant; adapta- 
tions and uses. 

Three hours per week throughout the year. Junior. Credit: 3 
hours. Fee, $2.00. 



5 6 STATE NORMAL SCHOOL 

4. Zoology. 

A study of structure in animals in simple and most highly de- 
veloped forms. A close view of animal processes and functions. 
The adaptations of structure to use and environment. The classes 
and orders of animals. The wonder of life, growth, development. 
The origin and end of animated existence. The relationships of 
animals and the meaning of resemblance. A study of man and his 
kindred types. Dissection and other loboratory work. 

Three hours per week throughout the year. Senior. Credit: 3 
hours. Fee, $3.00. 

5. Organic Chemistry. 

A systematic study of the classification and relation of the carbon 
compounds; a study of the digestion, metabolism and chemical 
composition of foods. A brief outline of the course includes: 
hydrocarbons, as related to fuels and dry cleaning; alcohols and 
preservatives related to general household processes; acids, as re- 
lated to the study of fats, vinegar, fruits and vegetables; esters, as 
used for flavorings; fats, as to occurrence, composition, and re- 
actions. Emphasis is constantly placed on the practical and pro- 
fessional side of study. Prerequisite: Inorganic Chemistry; Food 
Study and Cookery 1. 

Three hours per week throughout the year. Junior. Credit: 3 
hours. Fee, $3.00. 

6. Physiological Chemistry. 

This course presents the essential chemical facts pertaining to 
human nutrition including chemical constituents of cells, chemistry 
of foods, digestion, absorption, assimulation, tissue composition; 
excretion. The laboratory work includes experiments and demon- 
strations on fermentation; respiration; salivary, gastric pancreatic 
and intestinal digestion in relationship to life processes. Prerequi- 
sites: Inorganic and Organic Chemistry. 

Three hours per week. Senior. Credit: 1 Vz hours. Fee, $3.00. 



STATE NORMAL SCHOOL 57 

CARNEGIE LIBRARY 



This building, as indicated by its name, was the gift of Mr. 
Andrew Carnegie. It is well equipped with Library Bureau furni- 
ture and contains about ten thousand volumes with something like 
three thousand pamphlets. The faculty and registered students of 
the school have free access to the library and may draw books for 
home reading. To the general public it is for reference only. 

Ihe Reading Room is of infinite value to the students both for 
general reading and ferefernce work. The following magazines are 
one file: American Cookery, American Journal of Education, Ameri- 
can Magazine, American School Board Journal, Atlantic Monthly, 
Bookman, Century, Country Life, Current History, New York Times, 
Current Opinion, Delineator, Education, Educational Review, Ele- 
mentary School Journal, Good Housekeeping, Independent, Industrial 
Arts Magazine, Journal of Education, Journal of Home Economics, 
Journal of Psychology, Kindergarten and First Grade, Ladies' Home 
Journal, Literary Digest, Manual Training Magazine, Missionary Re- 
view, Musical America, Nation, National Geographic, Nature Study 
Review, New Republic, North American Review, Normal Instructor, 
Outlook, Playground, Progressive Farmer, Readers' Guide to Peri- 
odical Literature, Review of Reviews, Saturday Evening Post, School 
Arts Magazine, School Century, School and Home Education, School 
and Society, School Review, Survey Teachers' College Record, Tex- 
tile World, Travel, Woman's Home Companion, Worlds' Work, Yale 
Review, Harper's Monthly, Mentor, Hibbert's Journal, American City, 
Woman Citizen. These magazines are bound at the end of each 
school year and prove a most valuable aid in the Reference Depart- 
ment. 

The library is open daily (except Sunday) from 8:45 A. M. until 
5:30 P. M., closing for the dinner hour. Books other than "Re- 
serves" may be borrowed from the library for two weeks. Reserved 
books are issued overnight only. 

It is the main purpose of the library to both create and stimulate 
a taste for good literature as well as serve the various departments 
in their reference work. It is our ambition to give every student 
of every department a working knowledge of the institution and 
thereby double its value to the student body. 



5S STATE NORMAL SCHOOL 

CORRESPONDENCE STUDY 



General Information. 

The State Normal School offers correspondence to those whose 
duties make it impossible for them to pursue in residence. These 
courses are designed for those who are interested in professional 
growth, desire guidance or wish to supplement their training. 
These courses are prepared by the regular members of the Faculty 
and are given in the class rooms of the several departments during 
the regular session. 

Nature of the Work. 

Each course shall consist of as many lessons as the instructor 
may require. Each semester course shall approximate a minimum 
of 200 hours work. Each lesson shall consist of assignments from 
texts, supplementary reading, questions to test the method of the 
work, and the results obtained. 

Credit. 

For each course with the equivalent of a semester's work, the 
State Normal School allows % hour credit. This credit may apply 
towards a diploma or a degree. 

No fractional course can be offered for credit. The full course 
must be taken if credit is to be obtained. 

Admission Requirements. 

The State Normal School wishes to be reasonably sure that a 
student can succeed in the courses he desires to take, and it re- 
serves the right to examine his application carefully and before en- 
rollment, to recommend other courses than those selected, or reject 
the application if the statements on his blanks justify such action. 
If the student is not accepted or if he does not wish to change from 
his original choice, his fee will be refunded. 

A student wishing to enroll must not be in attendance in any 
other institution, and must satisfy the entrance requirements of 
the State Normal School. 

Courses. 

No student will be allowed to enroll in more than two courses at 
the same time. It is advised that all of the time be concentrated 
on one course. A student is expected to finish the course by end of 
scholastic year. A minimum of one semester is allowed a student 
to finish a course provided he distributes his work evenly. 

Before a student enrolls for a course he must fulfill all the pre- 
requisites required by the instructor. 



STATE NORMAL SCHOOL 59 

The methods of instruction serves to keep the student and teach- 
er in close contact with the work of the course. After preparing 
the lesson the student writes his answers and mails his paper to 
the instructor together with any questions concerning such diffi- 
culties as may have arisen during the study. The instructor cor- 
rects and comments on the paper and returns it to the student. In 
like manner the work goes on until the course is completed. No 
incomplete course will be given credit. 

Examinations on each course will be given either at the State 
Normal School or under supervision satisfactory to the State Nor- 
mal Echool. No credit is given unless an examination is taken. 

If on account of interruptions or delays the course is deferred, a 
fee of ($3.00) three dollars will be charged for extension of time. 

No course is given during summer vacation. 

Credit Value Toward a Diploma or Degree. 

No student may take more than one-third of the work required 
for a diploma or a degree by correspondence. 

One year of residence is required of all students who wish to 
obtain a diploma or a degree. 

The State Normal School does not grant a diploma or a degree 
for correspondence study work alone. 

Fees. 

All fees are payable in advance and they should accompany the 
application for instruction. The matriculation fee is $10 and is 
required of all students at the time of their first registration. The 
tuition fee for each semester course is twelve dollars ($12.00). 
The tuition fee includes payment for instruction sent for return of 
lesson papers. 

No fees will be returned after the work has begun. 

Enroll. 

Application blanks will be sent on request. 

A student may begin a course for which he has been accepted at 
any time which will allow the work to be completed by end of 
scholastic year. It is advised that application be made in September 
and February. 

Fill out the application blank, enclose a money order made pay- 
able to President Jere M. Pound, and address to President Jere M. 
Pound, State Normal School, Athens, Ga. 



60 STATE NORMAL SCHOOL 

LECTURE COURSES 



The school maintains a Lyceum Course which is free to all the 
students of the school and in which are engaged the best platform 
performers we can procure. In addition to this, a series of lectures 
hy prominent men and women in the state, who have accomplished 
things in the special line of work in which each is interested, is kept 
up throughout the year. 

Moreover, Athens affords the school wonderful opportunity for 
seeing and hearing those who have attained distinction along many 
lines of endeavor. The school, in fact, is at times embarrassed with 
the richness of its opportunities of this kind. From time to time 
such men as Dr. Campbell Morgan, Mr. George Foster Peabody and 
others of national reputation speak in the auditorium. But they 
are invaluable aids in giving finishing touches to the education 
which the school is striving to impart to its student body. 

MOTION PICTURES 



Motion pictures are frequently used by the various teachers to 
supplement their class-room instruction. This method of teaching 
has proven to be both interesting and instructive. 

The moving picture machine is also used hy lecturers who visit 
the school and at such times when the students are not otherwise 
engaged some of the best popular films are shown. 

TYPEWRITING 



The following courses are offered to those who are specializing to 
become teachers in the Kindergarten, the Elementary, the Junior 
High or the High Schools of the state. They are not commercial 
courses in any sense of the word. Instead, they are of a type that 
hundreds of prospective teachers, ambitious to command the big- 
gest positions, are demanding. 

1. Course A. 

Offered to those who have no knowledge of the touch method of 
typewriting. This is a basic course in correct practice of advanced 
material at the outset. 

2. Course B. 

Candidates who can write thirty words per minute, without 
errors, are eligible. Stress is placed on the vital importance of 



STATE NORMAL SCHOOL 61 

typewriting as a tool in the hands of student, teacher or social 
worker. A certificate is issued to all students who pass examina- 
tions satisfactorily and can write sixty words per minute. College 
credit can be arranged for this course. 

3. Course C. 

Prerequisite Course B. The psychology of learning and teaching 
of typewriting (method), the learning curve and transfer values 
are presented. Regular practice in the use of the dictaphone is 
introduced throughout the entire course. 

4. Course D. 

Offered to all ambitious individuals who can write seventy-five 
words per minute for a period of fifteen minutes without making any 
errors. In this course speed, as well as accuracy, is stressed. 
Greater efficiency in the use of the dictaphone is required. All stu- 
dents passing the one hundred word tests at the typewriter and the 
dictaphone receive a diploma. 

Each course represents, on the average, fifty hours of intensive 
and pleasant work under very highly controlled conditions. A 
small fee of $12.00 ($6.00, if you supply your own machines) per 
course is required, payable in advance. 

STUDENT ORGANIZATIONS 



1. The Young Women's Christian Association. 

The Young Women's Christian Association, through its social life, 
Vesper services, Morning Watch, Bible study, mission study, church 
attendance and intercollegiate relationships, seek to promote the 
spirit of Christian thinking and Christian living among students 
and to train them for Christian work. 

The Social Work consists in aiding new students to harmonious 
adjustment to the school life and its activities. 

The Course in World Fellowship is carefully planned and the 
text books used are the newest and best, treating both home and 
foreign mission problems. 

Intercollegiate relationships have been established by delegations 
to the Georgia Student Volunteer Union, the Southern Conference 
of the Young Woman's Christian Association, by visits of traveling 
student secretaries, delegates to the Normal Student Volunteer 
Convention, Cabinet training councils, visiting Secretaries of the 
churches and W. C. T. U., and by the interchange of reports and 
methods with other associations. 



62 STATE NORMAL SCHOOL 

Church atteadance is emphasized in order that the students may- 
derive all the spiritual benefits possible from the tsxcellent church 
facilities of Athens. 

2. Bible Study. 

The purpose of this course is to give such a general knowledge 
of the Bible as will furnish to the students a. background for future 
work in detail. 

The lessons are arranged for systematic daily readings through 
the Bible, beginning with Oenesis. Weekly lessons are held on 
these readings, bringing out such points about the great Book as 
every person ought to know. 

The aim of the teachers in presenting these lessons is to bring 
the students into loving acquaintance with God's Word. This course 
covers four years. 

The First Year's Course embraces the Law and History of the 
Hebrew Nation as found in the Bible from Genesis to Esther in- 
clusive. 

The Second Year's Course is a study of the Poetry and Prophecy 
of the Bible, beginning with the book of Job and extending through 
the Old Testament. 

The Third Year's Course is the Life of Christ, or the historical 
study of the four Gospels. The lessons are so arranged as to bring 
together the corresponding parts of the four Gospels for comparison. 
There is no attempt made to study these parts critically, but simply 
to present the facts as given by the four writers. 

The Fourth Year's Course is a study of the Acts of the Apostles, 
of the Epistles, and of Revelation. 

The course is entirely optional, but all students are encouraged 
to join one of these classes, and due recognition is given their work 
in the permanent records of the school. 

The Bible classes are taught by members of the Faculty. 

The State Normal School won second honor in this work in the 
United States at the Panama Exposition Young Women's Christian 
Associational National Contest in 1915. 

There has been an interest in the memorizing of Scripture pre- 
scribed by Helen Gould Shepherd, for which she presents a Student's 
Bible. The school has won 246 of these Bibles. This was discon- 
itnued in 1921. 

Since 1922 Mrs. Gertrude Alexander has been giving the Campbell 
Morgan edition of the Bible. Bringing our number to 260. 

Students are urged to keep in their respective classes in Bible 
work as in other studies. 

The State Normal School won first honor in the United States on 



STATE NORMAL SCHOOL 63 

the Student Association Honor Roll at the Panama Exposition lor 
the largest average in production to total enrollment in Mission 
Study and Social Welfare classes in 1915. The School won second 
honor places in the two subjects that follow: volunteer Bible Sti'dy 
classes and attendance on religious services. 

3. Woman's Christian Temperance Union. 

In conjunction with the Young Woman's Christian Association 
work of the school, there is an organized Woman's Christian Tem- 
perance Union which holds regular meetings once per month and 
endeavors to further the study and interest in the Temperance 
Cause. 

4. Altioria Literary Society. 

At one time there was only one society in the State Normal 
School. On account of the overwhelming number of members it 
was advised that two societies be formed. In 1905 the two literary 
societies, under their new names, Mildred Rutherford and Altioria, 
began their work anew. Professor Earnest gave us our name 
"Altioria," meaning higher and better. Since the date of our birth, 
under the aim and excellent prevailing spirit of our motto, "Ex- 
celsior," we have been growing each year, striving for the supernal 
and superior things in our school life. The aim of the Altioria So- 
ciety is the advancement of scholarship by enjoying together the 
best to be found in literature and the devolpment of "Ideal Woman- 
hood" through faithfulness and usefulness to our school and to 
our fellows. 

5. The Mildred Rutherford Literary Society. 

The aim of this society is to develop the literary phase of the 
student life through the creation of an interest in and appreciation 
for literature, music and art. The betterment of the social life of 
the school is the result of the activities of this organization and it 
is in this connection that some of the closest friendships are formed 
which exist not only while in attendance here but the influence of 
which will be felt into the future. 

An example of the highest type of womanhood is set before the 
girls in the sponsor of the organization, Miss Mildred Rutherford, 
whose fine and noble character and the ideals for which she stands 
are ever a beacon light to those who know her. 

(>. D* Alliance Francaise. 

One of the distinctive features of the French course is the oppor- 
tunity of the students to affiliate with the L'Alliance Francaise. an 
organization composed of those familiar with and interested in the 



64 STATE NORMAL SCHOOL 

French language both in this school and the other educational in- 
stitutions of the city. Meetings are held once a month, at which 
time prominent French scholars address the organization on some 
topic of general interest. This organization has been a means of 
creating a greater interest in and a wider knowledge for the French 
language. 

The Honorary President of the L'Alliance Francaise (Athens 
group) is Chancellor D. C. Barrow of the University, and the Pres- 
ident, Professor J. Lustrat, head of the department of Romance 
Languages at the University and at the Normal School. 

7. Glee Club. 

The purpose of this organization is recreative choral work as well 
as to afford an opportunity for the study of classical compositions. 
Membership isi open to any member of the student body. The or- 
ganization gives two concerts annually and assists at other functions 
of the school. 

8. County Clubs. 

Nearly every county in Georgia is represented at the State Normal. 
Many of these counties have enough students to organize and there 
are more than twenty county clubs. There are a number of benefits 
to be derived from these clubs. Among the most important are — a 
definite way to study home county and home conditions; a united 
band to aid in the development of county affairs; a splendid way for 
those from home to get together; a medium to interest other stu- 
dents in the school; a course of great pleasure and leisure. These 
clubs are doing splendid, constructive work. More counties are to 
be organized and it is the aim of all of them to keep up the supply 
of members from year to year and to be of real service to the 
people at home. 

9. The Round Table. 

The Round Table is a gathering of all students who desire to 
attend at a regular meeting every Saturday night just when supper 
is over. The organization is nine years old and its aim is to fur- 
nish wholesome recreation and to develop a love for and a power to 
tell the best stories to be found in our literature. Current topics 
are discussed, songs rendered and some pleasing story told and 
commented on. This organization started with but six members 
at its inception, and now has increased in size until there is no 
room on the school campus that will hold the attendance without 
crowding. 



STATE NORMAL SCHOOL 65 

10. Athletic Association. 

The Athletic Association is an organization of the students to 
promote and encourage outdoor sports and athletics and is under 
the direct supervision of the Department of Physical Education. 

The Association has a well-equipped athletic field, with courts 
for tennis, basketball, volley ball and other games. Field Days and 
various athletic contests stimulate interest in outdoor activities and 
provide sane, wholesome recreation. 

11. Alumni -ae Association. 

The Alumni-ae Association of the State Normal School is an or- 
ganization concerned with the welfare of the school and its alumi- 
ae, and with the professional advancement of education. It is the 
channel through which the school and its alumni-ae can be of 
mutual help to each other. Its purpose is to provide a scholarship 
fund, to promote loyalty to the school, and to disseminate the ideals 
for which the school stands. 

All graduates of the school are active members of the Association 
and all persons, who have at any time been students of the school, 
are associate members. 

The officers of the Association are as follows: President, Kate E. 
Hicks; Secretary, Iris Callaway; Treasurer, Mrs. H. C. Doolittle. 

12. Reflex. 

The Reflex is the student paper. It is issued in newspaper style. 
It is printed twice a month. All general school news; society 
dots; editorials; literary society pages; Y. W. C. A. notes and jokes 
from the basis of its development. The editors are elected from 
the student body. They do all the writing for the paper under the 
supervision of a faculty member. 

13. Crystal. 

The Crystal is the Senior Annual. Every Senior class publishes a 
Crystal. The book appears at the end of the year. It is a memory 
book in printed form. The editors are elected from the Senior 

class. 

STATISTICS FOR 1924-25 



Registered students to date (March 19, 1925), 650; students 
registered during Summer School, 363; pupils in Muscogee Ele- 
mentary School and Country School, 263. Total, 1,276. 

Teachers and officers, GO; Counties represented by. students, 120. 
Students holding diplomas from other schools, 433; students hold- 



66 STATE NORMAL SCHOOL 

ing first grade license, 55; second grade license, 18; students hav- 
ing experience in teaching, 67. Fifty percent of all our students 
are the sons and daughters of farmers. 

The total registration since the (foundation of the school, 15,582. 
more than 90 percent of whom have since taught in our common 
schools. Total graduates to June, 1924, 2,374. Graduating class 
this year numbers 262. 

Buildings Academic buildings, 4; Dormitory buildings, 4; Din- 
ing Hall and Senior Hall building, 1; Rural School, 1; Carnegie 
Library, 1; Infirmary, 1; Practice Home, 1; Dairy barn, 1; Stock 
barn, 1. Total, 15. 



STATE NORMAL SCHOOL 



67 



ROLL OF STUDENTS, 1924-25 
Senior Degree 



Name County 

Artau, Dolores _____ Glynn 
Bailey, Annie B. _ _ _ _ Clarke 
Bailey, Mary Ethel _ _ Clarke 
Baker, Julia _____ Madison 
Collins, Dorothy _ _ _ _, Schley 
Dillard, Frances _ _ Oglethorpe 
Hall, Mary _ _ _ _ Richmond 
Harris, F. L. _ _ _ _ Catoosa 
Harvey, Jimmie _ _ _ _ Sumter 
Holliday, Edith _ _ _ _ Jackson 
Hughes, Opal _____ Clarke 
Jordan, Lucile _ _ Washington 



Name County 

Kelly, Grace Lee Upson 

Kelly, Louise _ Gwinnett 

Kelly, Mary Gwinnett 

Kinney, Paul _ _ _ _ Lincoln 
Lewis, Eula _____ Lincoln 
Matthews, Nora _ _ _ Paulding 
Mitchell, Irene _____ Bibb 
Moore, Elizabeth _ _ _ Wilkes 
Northcutt, Sara Frances _ Cobb 

Parsons, Lucy Grace Banks 

Walden, Lois _ _ _ _ Chatham 
Wallace, Myrtle Barrow 



Boykin, Elizabeth _ 
Hancock, Ethel . 



Junior Degree 

Carroll Joiner, Frances 
Clarke 



Senior 



Adams, Annie _ _ _ 
Adams, Grace _ _ _ 
Aderhold, Edna _ _ 
Alexander, Chelma _ 
Almon, Nellie _ _ 
Atkinson, Agnes _ . 
Eagley, Ethel _ _ . 
Bailey, Bobbie _ _ 
Ballard, Ruby _ _ . 
Barnett, Jewell _ _ 
Beddingfield, Louise 
Bivins, Sarah _ _ _ 
Bond, Lera _ _ _ _ 
Bond, Rena _ _ _ _ 
Bonner, Macy _ _ _ 
Bowen, Ella Mae _ _ 
Bradfield, Avy _ _ 
Breedlove, Lula _ _ 
Brown, Clyde _ _ _ 

Brown, Eurilla 

Burgess, Grace 

Burrell, Willie 



Meriwether 

Meriwether 

_ Franklin 

_ Toombs 

Meriwether 

. _ Greene 

. Muscogee 

_ _ Troup 

. _ _ Pike 

_ _ Oconee 

_ _ Dooly 

_ _ Jones 

_ Madison 

_ Madison 

_ Lincoln 

_ Franklin 

_ _ Fulton 

_ _ Coffee 

_ _ Dodge 

_ Franklin 

_ _ Wilkes 

. _ Raburn 



Burson, Mary _ 
Cantrell, Agnes _ 
Cash, Montine - 
Castlen, Marianne 
Chance, Florence 
Chastian, Lota _ 
Cheney, Mary F. _ 
Christian, Mary _ 
Chunn, Mae _ _ 
Coachman, Fannie 
Cochran, Lucile _ 
Collier, Mattiemae 
Collins, Dessie _ . 
Collins, Louise _ 
Conaway, Clarice 
Cook, Mary _ _ _ 
Cowan, Grace _ _ 
Cox, Johnnie _ _ _ 
Cox, Thelma _ _ 
Craig, Mary G. _ 
Craven, Helen _ _ 
Crawford, Mamie . 



Laurens 



. _ _ Carroll 
_ _ _ Gordon 
_ _ Gwinnett 
_ _ _ Monroe 

Chatham 

. _ _ Thomas 

Randolph 

_ _ _ Newton 
_ Meriwether 
Mae_Seminole 

Cobb 

Talbot 

. _ _ Barrow 

_ _ _ Clarke 

_ _ _ Clarke 

. _ _ Walton 

_ _ Clayton 

. _ Jefferson 

_ _ Taylor 

_ Gwinnett 

_ Haralson 

_ _ _ Bibb 



68 



STATE NORMAL SCHOOL 



Name 

Crow, Pay _ _ _ 
Culpepper, Virginia 
Dallas, Kathryn _ _ 
Davis, Belle _ _ _ . 
Dickerson, Adel _ _ 
Downs, Blanche _ _ . 
Drewry, Josephine _ . 
Duggan, Mary W. _ 
Dunahoo, Julia _ _ _ 
Dunson, Jennie _ _ 
Eberhardt, Ruth _ _ 
Edwards, Caroline _ . 
Edwards, Grace _ _ 
Ellerbee, Dunnie _ _ 
Eyler, Mary _ _ _ _ 
Planigan, Mamie Lou 
Flannery, Virginia _ 
Gardner, Susan _ _ 
Garrett, Mary _ _ _ 
Garrett, Sara _ _ _ _ 
Gates, Vivian _ _ _ . 
Gholston, Mary _ _ _ 
Gibson, Helen _ _ _ 
Gilmore, Mildred _ _ 
Gleaton, Gladys _ _ _ 
Glenn, Florrie _ _ _ 
Glisson, Louise _ _ _ 
Goodwin, Lucy _ _ _ 
Greene, Ruby _ _ _ 
Griffeth, Ruby Lee _ 
Guest, Irlene _ _ _ 
Halman, Lois _ _ _ . 
Hampton, Annie Mae 
Hammock, Frances _ 
Hamrick, Louise _ _ 
Hamrick, Laura Mae _ 
Hardman, Annie Lee . 
Harman, Hildred _ _ 
Harris, Daisy _ _ _ _ 
Harrison, Maymeelu _ 
Hay, Annie May _ _ . 
Hayes, Urania _ _ _ 



County Name County 

_ Mitchell Hellman, Rosalyn _ _ Chatham 

Meriwether Henderson, Lucile _ _ _ Jasper 

_ _ Upson Henley, Kathryne Chattooga 

_ Gwinnett Henry, Martha _ _ _ _ Walker 

_ Sumter Hewell, Frances _ _ _ _ Wilkes 

_ _ Oconee Hinely, Pearl _ _ _ Effingham 

_ _ _ Pike Holbrook, Esther _ _ Franklin 

_ Pulaski Holman, Vesta _ _ _ _ Sumter 

_ Barrow Holliday, Josephine _ Stewart 

_ _ Troup Hollowell, Dorothy _ _ Chatham 

_ Jackson Holt, Sara _____ Chatham 

_ _ Fulton Howard, Patsy _ Chattahoochee 

_ McDuffie Howell, Alberta _ _ _ _ Dooly 

_ _ Lee Hubbard, Annie _ _ _ Troup 

Chatham Hubbard, Evelyn Franklin 

_ Lincoln Hudson, Elizabeth _ Dougherty 

_ Coweta Humphreys, Ruth _ _ _ Pulaski 

_ DeKalb James, Emeline _ _ _ _ Taylor 

_ Walton Jennings, Margaret _ _ Clarke 

_ Wilkes Johnson, Essie Mae _ Muscogee 

_ _ Troup Johnson, Fay _ _ _ _ Franklin 

_ Clarke Johnson, Lois _ _ _ _ Madison 

_ Laurens Johnson Vivian _ _ _ _ Early 

_ Turner Jones, Emily _____ Jasper 

. _ Worth Jordon, Helen _ _ _ _ Terrell 

_ Oconee Jordon, Opal _ _ _ _ Muscogee 

_ Thomas Kidd, Agnes ______ Baker 

_ Macon King, Mattie Jefferson 

_ _ Jones Kinney, B. C. _ _ _ _ Lincoln 

_ Madison Lanier, Ruth _____ DeKalb 

_ Sumter Lanier, Thelma _ _ _ Screven 

. _ Troup Latham, Helen _ _ _ _ Fulton 

_ Madison Lazarus, Daisy _____ Glynn 

_ Jones Leybourne, Eloise _ _ _ Glynn 

_ Pickens Lifsey, Eliza _____ Taylor 

Haralson Lindsey, Flossie _____ Clay 

_ Madison Lively, lone _ _ _ Oglthorpe 

_ Carroll Long, Sara _______ Lee 

_ Terrell Loyd, Martha _____ Troup 

_ Johnson McElroy, Mrs. Homer — Clarke 

_ _ _ Lee McElwaney, Louna _ _ Coweta 

_ Barrow McLellan, Hazel _ _ _ Mitchell 



STATE NORMAL SCHOOL 



69 



Name County 

Mallard, Maggie Lee _ Chatham 
Mallery, Louise _ _ _ Chatham 
Mann, Allene _____ Fulton 
Mann, Martha _ _ _ Meriwether 

Mansfield, Nellie Wilkes 

Mapp, Gladys _____ Clarke 

Maxwell, Martha _ _ _ _ Talbot 

Merritt, Jewell _ _ _ _ Webster 

Michels, Betty _ _ _ Chatham 
Miller, Florence _ _ _ Jackson 
Miller, Margaret _ _ _ _ Bibb 

Mills, Gladys _ _ _ _ Randolph 

Milton, Ellmore _ _ _ Jefferson 
Milton, Marie _____ Gilmer 

Moon, Sara Louise _ _ Walton 
Moncrief, Frances Elizabeth _ 
__________ Coweta 

Morcock, Orlena _ _ _ Chatham 
Murrah, Helen _ _ _ _ Carroll 

Newby, Alice ______ Dooly 

Nicholson, Mabel _ _ _ Oconee 

Norwood, Susie Chatham 

Pace, Leila Maud _ _ _ Terrell 
Parker, Lula _ _ _ _ Franklin 

Parks, Beatrice _ _ _ Gwinnett 
Peacock, Evelyn _ _ _ Dodge 
Pearce, Mabel _ _ _ Randolph 
Peek, Annie Laurie _ _ Newton 
Pennington, Hattie _ Jefferson 
Pennington, Maude _ McDuffie 
Penny, Mrs. Margaret R. Clarke 
Perryman, Mildred _ Randolph 
Persons, Elsie _ _ _ _ Upson 

Petree, Idelle ______ Cobb 

Pickett, Mary Frances _ Newton 
Poindexter, Anna _ _ Calhoun 
Polk, Vivian _ _ _ _ Screven 

Poole, Ruby _ _ _ _ Gwinnett 

Porterfield, Ruth _ _ _ Clarke 
Price, Louise _____ Clarke 

Price, Minnie Mae _ _ Johnson 
Prince, Ruth _ _ _ Crawford 



Name County 

Quttlebaum, Fay _ _ _ Barrow 
Redding, Louise _ Chattahoochee 
Richards, Leola _____ Hall 
Roberts, Kathryn _ _ _ Terrell 
Robinson, Sophie _ _ _ Glynn 
Rountree, Edith _ _ Emmanuel 
Rowe, Myrtle _ _ _ _ Gwinnett 
Ruddell, Lois _ _ _ _ Gordon 
Russell, Willie Mae _ _ Jones 
Rutherford, Faye _ _ _ Greene 
Sanders, Frances _ _ _ Jackson 
Saunders, Margaret _ _ Taylor 
Saville, Laura Agnes_ Muscogee 
Scales, Mary ______ Banks 

Scott, Mary Frances Madison 

Shelton, Ruby _ _ _ _ Warren 
Shepard, Hazel _ _ _ _ Miller 
Shockley, Edna _ _ _ _ Morgan 

Sholar, Alice Hall 

Smith, Dorothy _ _ _ _ Dodge 

Smith, Grace _ _ _ _ Houston 

Smith, H. Grace _ _ _ Fulton 
Smith, Hazel _____ Talbot 

Smith, Louise _____ Oconee 

Smith, Mildred _ _ _ _ Harris 

Smith, Miriam _ _ _ _ Talbot 

Stanfield, Nona Mae _ Tattnal 
Stewart, Mollie _ _ _ _ Terrell 

Still, Mary E. _ _ _ Rockdale 
Stokes, Grace ______ Bibb 

Stone, Myrtle _ _ _ _ Clarke 

Stovall, Janie Lee Madison 

Stovall, Ruth _ _ _ _ Elbert 
Strickland, Hallie _ Oglethorpe 
Stripling, Mary _____ Talbot 
Sutline, Josephine _ _ Chatham 
Tabor, Ruth _____ Madison 
Taylor, Furlow _ _ _ _ Macon 
Templeton, Beatrice _ Richmond 
Templeton, Lillian _ Richmond 
Thompson, Blannie _ _ Harris 
Thompson. Lorene _ _ _ Walton 



70 



STATE NORMAL SCHOOL 



Name County 

Thrasher, Louise _ _ _ Turner 
Thrasher, Sara Sue _ Rockdale 
Tiller, Mary _____ Berrien 

Tucker, Fannilu Barrow 

Vance, Adelaide _ _ Gwinnett 
Verner, Sara _____ Oconee 

Wasdin, Julia ______ Bibb 

Waters, Ida Mae _ _ _ _ Hall 

Waters, Lois _______ Hall 

Watts, Mary _____ Raburn 

Weaver, Eloise _ _ _ _ Taylor 

Welch, Emma _____ Butts 

Westbrook, Ethel Stewart 

Whatley, Victoria _ _ _ Macon 



Name 

Whittington, Edna _ 

Wiley, Marie 

W T ilhite, Helena _ _ 
Wilkins, Helen _ _ 
Williams, Mary _ 
Williamson, Odessa . 
Wilson, Cortez _ _ 
Wood, Christine _ _ 
Wood, Memphis _ _ 
Wood, Mozelle _ _ 
Worsham, Ruth _ 

Wynn, Edith 

Wynne, Mattie 



County 

Taylor 

. _ Stephens 

Clarke 

_ _ Fayette 
_ Gwinnett 

Clarke 

_ _ Jackson 

_ _ Coweta 

_ Gwinnett 
_ _ Greene 
_ _ DeKalb 

Bibb 

. Oglethorpe 



Allison, Katherine _ 
Amis, Julius _ _ _ . 
Anderson, Marie _ _ 
Andrews, Alice _ _ 
Arnow, Grace _ _ . 
Bacon, Emily _ _ _ 
Bacon, Mildred _ _ 
Bagwell, Ollie Lee . 
Bailey, Mary L. _ . 
Baldwin, Frances _ 
Banks, Bertie _ _ _ 
Banks, Levola _ _ 
Bell, Freddie _ _ _ 
Bennett, Sara _ _ _ 
Berry, Elizabeth _ . 
Blackmon, Allene _ 
Boland, Althea _ _ 
Boling, Olamae _ _ 

Bond, Margaret 

Boston, Edna _ _ 
Bostwick, Alice _ . 
Bowden, Eloise _ _ 
Boyd, Florence _ _ 
Boyd, Obeda _ _ _ 
Boyette, Maud _ _ 
Eoyle, Marie C. _ _ 



Junior 

_ _ Macon Brantley, Leslie _ _ _ Laurens 

_ _ Clarke Breedlove, Martha Walton 

" Jefferson Bridges, Bertha Madison 

_ _ Oconee 

i^o™^- Bridges, J. M. _ Whitfield 

_ Camden 

Oglethorpe Brooks, Lillie _____ Clarke 

. _ Tattnall Burns, Wilma Gordon 

_ Stephens Burrell, Veta Mae _ _ _ Towns 

_ _ Troup Butler, Annie Vic _ _ _ Clarke 

„ _ Terrell Caldwell, Olene _____ Pike 

_ Stephens Callaway, Irene _ _ _ Whitfield 

. _ Douglas Campbell, Louise _ _ _ Houston 

_ _ Terrell Campbell, Mildred _ _ _ Fulton 

_ _ Clarke Cargill, Lillie Mae _ _ Chatham 

_ _ Lamar Carpenter, Ivan _ _ _ _ Elbert 

_ _ Wilkes Carswell, Lucile _ _ _ Madison 

_ Muscogee Castleberry, Frances _ _ Sumter 

Habersham Chapman, Lydia Belle Muscogee 

C arke Childs, Emmalu _ _ _ _ Butts 

_ _ Gordon Christian, Iris _____ Clarke 

. _ Morgan Clements, Frances _ _ _ _ Bibb 

_ Muscogee Cocroft, Elizabeth _ _ _ _ Cook 

_ _ Douglas Cocroft, Louise _ _ _ _ Morgan 

_ _ Clarke Coker, Mary _____ Terrell 

_ Randolph Collins, Kittie _ _ _ _ Schley 

_ Chatham Connors, Lucile _ _ _ Sumter 



STATE NORMAL SCHOOL 



71 



Name County 

Craver, Winnie May _ _ _ _ 

______ North Carolina 

Crawford, Lucy _ _ _ _ Bartow 

Culpepper, Florence Meriwether 
Culpepper, Margaret Meriwether 
Darden, Christine _ _ _ Worth 
Darden, Howard _ _ _ _ Troup 

Darden, Margaret _ _ _ Worth 
Davis, Lois _ _ _ _ Muscogee 

Deane, Lola _____ Stephens 

Dell, Carolyn _ _ _ _ Sumter 

Dell, Laurie _____ Sumter 

DeLoach, Minnie - - Tattnall 
Denard, Mattie _ _ _ _ Wilkes 

Dennard, Ruth Webster 

Dillard, Frances _ _ _ Wilkes 
Dooly, Roberta _ _ _ _ Oconee 

Dotson, Mary _ _ _ _ Chatham 

Downey, Eunice _ _ Haralson 
Duffy, Louise ______ Bibb 

Duncan, Edna _ _ _ Oglethorpe 
Duncan, Nelle ______ Bibb 

Dunstan, Grace _______ 

_ _ _ _ Porto Alegre, Brazil 

Durrence, Jewel _ _ _ Tattnall 
Durrence, Vera _ _ _ Tattnall 
Eason, Daisy _____ Wilcox 

Edwards, Evelyn Haralson 

Edwards, Mildred _ _ _ Wilcox 
Epperson, Elma _ Midway, Ala. 
Everett, Mary Frances _ Clarke 
Fanning, Marcia _ _ _ McDuffie 
Fields, Jane Louise _ _ Turner 
Flannery, Mary Frances Coweta 
Florence, Jimmie _ _ Jefferson 
Forehand, Smyrna _ _ Bleckley 
Fordham, Edith _ _ _ Laurens 
Fortson, Louise _ _ Muscogee 
Fulcher, Dorothy _ _ _ Clarke 
Gartleman, Josephine. Chatham 
Gill, Ruth _ _ _ _ Meriwether 
Gilmore, Nellie _ _ _ _ Turner 



Name County 

Glass, Annie Mae _ _ _ Walton 
Godbee, Esther _ _ _ Tattnall 
Gorham, Marion _ _ _ _ Wilkes 

Gould, Edna _ _ _ _ Chatham 

Griffin, Lillie Mae _ Classcock 
Grimes, Martha _ _ _ _ Bibb 

Hale, Eula ______ Clarke 

Hall, Guy Nell _ _ _ Franklin 
Hammond, Natalie _ _ Pickens 
Hancock, Cleo _____ Clarke 

Hardeman, Jessie _ _ _ Clarke 
Hardin, Ruth _____ Monroe 

Hargrove, Marjorie _ Oglethorpe 

Harmon, Flora Fulton 

Harper, Gladys _ _ _ _ Morgan 
Harris, Audry _____ Clarke 
Harris, Louise _ _ Oglethorpe 
Harris, Lynda Belle _ _ Terrell 
Harris, Lowell _ _ _ _ Catoosa 
Harris, Mary _____ Marion 
Harvey, Ruth _ _ _ _ Sumter 
Haygood, Vera _____ Lamar 
Haynie, Lucile _ _ _ _ Barrow 

Hearn, Mildred Evans 

Hendley, Sara _____ Wilcox 

Henry, Frances _ _ _ _ Clarke 

Hicks, Emily _____ Macon 

Hill, Hazel ______ Barrow 

Hill, Mary Cathrine _ _ Sumter 
Hill, Pauline _____ Barrow 

Hodges, Bessie _ _ _ _ Screven 

Hodges, Cleo _____ Oconee 

Hogan, Mary Elizabeth Laurens 

Holcomb, Mary Ella Houston 

Hudson, Juliet _ _ _ _ Harris 

Hudson, Mary _____ Troup 

Hudson, Naomi _____ Bibb 

Huff, Mary _ _ _ _ Oglethorpe 

Humphries, Annie Merle _ _ 
________ Meriwether 

Humphrey, Rosa _ _ _ Pickens 
Isbell, Virginia _ _ _ Stephens 



72 



STATE NORMAL SCHOOL 



Name County 

Jackson, Frances _ _ Muscogee 

Jackson, Ollilu _ Henry 

Jarrell, Lillian _ _ Meriwether 
Jernigan, Pauline _ _ Seminole 

Johnson, Lucile _ _ Troup 

Johnson, Eloise _ _ _ Chatham 
Joiner, Carolyn Myrla _ _ Dooly 
Joiner, Jewell Mae _ _ _ Dooly 
Jones, Iola _____ Walton 

Jones, Nora ______ Jasper 

Jones, Ossie Lee _ _ _ _ Bryan 

Jordan, Marshelene Franklin 

Jordan, Susie _____ Jackson 
Keadle, Ruth _____ Lamar 
Kent, Mary Alice _ _ _ Stewart 
Kilpatrick, Anna Mary _ Morgan 
King, Olive _____ Sumter 
Kinnebrew, Ruth _ _ _ Clarke 
Lancaster, Mattie _ _ _ Pulaski 

Lane, Mary _ Chatham 

Lang, Sara Kate South Carolina 
Lang, Sara Sue _ _ _ _ Barrow 

Larson, Christine Laurens 

Latimer, Laura _ _ _ _ Wilkes 
Lavender, Eva _ _ _ _ Jackson 
Lee, Sara _ _ _ _ Meriwether 
Leonard, Grace _ _ _ Chatham 
Lewis, Mildred _ _ _ _ Bulloch 
Linch, Eugenia _____ Butts 

Little, Dorothy Franklin 

Locke, Pearl Dooly 

Lord, Lucibel Madison 

Lovett, Edna Campbell 

Lovett, Violet _ _ _ _ Ben Hill 
Lowe, Sara _____ Houston 

McDonald, Thelma Barrow 

McElwaney, Jessie _ _ Coweta 

McKenney, Rosalie _ Bibb 

McKinnon, Susie Clay 

McLeod, Elizabeth _____ 

-_-___ South Carolina 
MnLendon, Pauline _ _ _ Bibb 



Name County 

McRae, Ellen Cobb 

Macken, Wilhelmina _ Hancock 

Maddox, Louise Turner 

Malcolm, Curtis _ _ _ Walton 
Malcolm, Rachel _ _ _ Walton 
Marbut, Marguerite _ _ Clarke 
Martin, Avis _____ Bartow 
Martin, Cornelia _ _ _ Wilkes 
Massey, Bonnie _ _ _ Jackson 
Matthews, Wilma _ _ _ Troup 
Merritt, Tommie _ _ _ Webster 
Miller, Edith _ _ _ _ Terrell 
Minor, Pauline _ _ _ Gwinnett 
Moffat, Lucie _ _ _ Chatham 
Moncrief, Eva _____ Bibb 
Moncrief, Pearl _ _ _ _ Macon 

Montgomery, Virginia Floyd 

Moss, Gwynne _ _ _ _ Banks 
Mooney, Ola _ _ _ _ Coweta 
Morgan, Hilda Ruth Effiingham 
Moore, Lynette - - - _ Barrow 

Moorhead, Annie Grace Hart 

Moss, Dorothy _ _ _ _ Banks 

Murry, Pearl Madison 

Nix, Beatrice ______ Bibb 

Norwood, Samuella _ _ Thomas 
Oglesby, Fay _____ Hart 

Orr, Mary Louise _ _ _ Gordon 
Osborne, Irene _ _ _ . Oconee 
Overstreet, Sara _ _ _ Coweta 
Page, Frances _____ Bibb 

Parham, Rosa _____ Greene 

Parker, Fannie Lee Franklin 

Parker, Jessie Mae Barrow 

Payne, Margaret _ _ _ _ Taylor 
Peace, Sarah _ _ _ _ Douglas 
Peavy, Gertrude _ _ _ _ Peach 
Peek, Annie Sue _ _ _ Newton 
Perkins, Ollie _____ Pike 
Perkins, Ruth ...___ Stewart 
Pfister, Hilda . _ _ _ Thomas 
Phillips, Corrine _ _ _ _ Troup 



STATE NORMAL SCHOOL 



73 



Name County 

Phillips, Florrie _ _ _ Clarke 
Phillips, Mary Nell _ _ Walton 
Phillips, Vivian _ _ _ Franklin 
Pittard, Evelyn _ _ _ Gwinnett 
Powell, Vera _____ Raburn 
Quante, Dorothea _ _ Chatham 
Rankin, Louise _ _ _ _ DeKalb 

Reagin, Jane Frances Carroll 

Read, Lucia _____ Clarke 

Reed, Mary ______ Polk 

Renfroe, Mary Louise _ Wilcox 
Reynolds, Edna _ _ Richmond 
Richardson, Imogene _ Muscogee 
Robinson, Ada _ _ _ _ Decatur 

Rogers, Dorothy _ _ _ Appling 
Rogers, Grace _ _ _ _ Madison 

Rogers, Nellie _ _ _ _ Bartow 

Roser, Nell ______ Floyd 

Rosser, Erma _____ Henry 

Rosser, Nell ______ Henry 

Rowland, Adelle North Carolina 
Rucker, Annie Laurie _ Wilkes 

Sanders, Mabel _ Calhoun 

Sapp, Martha Stewart 

Sewell, Kathleen _ _ Franklin 
Shackelford, Virginia _ Wilcox 
Shafer, Ola ______ Troup 

Shahan, Margaret _ _ _ Floyd 
Shearouse, Annis _ _ Effingham 
Shelfer, Nettie _ _ _ _ Decatur 

Shellhorse, Melba _ _ Whitfield 
Sherrer, Beatrice _ _ _ Madison 
Shufflebarger, Elizabeth Toombs 

Sibley, Rachel Meriwteher 

Sims, Annie _____ Clarke 

Sims, Minnie Lee Troup 

Smith, Alberta _ _ _ Jefferson 
Smith, Alice _____ Walton 
Smith, Frances _ _ _ _ Clarke 
Smith, Jessie _ _ _ _ Jefferson 
Smith, Mamye _ _ _ _ Madison 
Smith, Ruby _____ Clarke 



Name County 

Sockwell, Mary _ _ _ _ Newton 
Sorrells, Mary Lane _ _ Clarke 
Souther, Kathrine Louise- Jones 
Stevens, Attalissa _ _ Stewart 
Stevens, Delree _ _ _ _ Clarke 
Stevens, Florence _ _ Sumter 
Stewart, Naomi _ _ _ _ Terrell 
Stokes, Pauline _____ Bibb 
Storey, Myrtis _ _ _ _ Clarke 
Strickland, Sara Kate_ Haralson 
Terry, Anna Ruth _ _ Randolph 
Thompson, Agnes _ Meriwether 
Thompson, Mattie Bell _ Harris 

Thorpe, Isabella Mcintosh 

Thurmond, Esther Monroe 

Tiller, Mildred Oglethorpe 

Toole, Henrietta Richmond 

Tribble, Louise _ _ _ _ Gordon 
Turner, Cora Lee _ _ Terrell 
Turner, Eunice _ _ _ Muscogee 
Turner, Ruth _ _ _ Meriwether 
Twiggs, Robbie _ _ _ Towns 
Veale, Ethel _____ Oconee 
Vieth, Rebecca _ South Carolina 
Wages, Ruth _____ Clarke 
Waits, Ilah _____ Jasper 
Waldrep, Kathleen _ _ Clarke 

Walker, Clara Maud Screven 

Walker, Mamie Tom Carroll 

Wallace, Inez _____ Bibb 
Walters, Josephine _ _ Sumter 
Wasdin, Pauline _ _ _ Screven 
Watkins, Laura _ _ _ Douglas 
Watt", Martha Lee _ _ Muscogee 
Watt, Rheta _ _ _ _ Muscogee 
Weaver, Eloise _ _ _ _ Taylor 
Webb, Lillie Mae _ _ _ Walton 
Weitman, Marion _ _ Chatham 
West, Janie Helen _ Habersham 

West Sara Hall 

Westbrook, Mary Grace _ _ _ 
_________ Franklin 



74 



STATE NORMAL SCHOOL 



Name County 

White, Kathryn _ _ _ Toombs 

Whitehead, Louise Oconee 

Wilkes, Mamie Louise _ Dooly 
Williams, Edris _ _ _ _ Crisp 
Williams, Helen _ _ _ Houston 
Williams, Louise _ _ _ Barrow 
Williams, Myzelle _ _ Crisp 



Name County 

Wilson, Rosalie Jackson 

Willson, Louise _ _ _ _ Newton 

Wood, Mary Elizabeth _ Clarke 
Wooldridge, Mary Love _ _ 
________ Muscogee 

Word, Dorothy _ _ _ _ Carroll 

Wren, Sara _____ Jefferson 



Sophomore 



Adams, Ruth ______ Bibb 

Beale, Gertrude _ _ Richmond 
Brabham, Frances _ _ Calhoun 
Brackett, Delia Lee _ _ Clarke 
Callaway, Helen _ _ _ Wilkes 

Castlen, Ida Monroe 

Chandler, Martha _ _ _ Oconee 
Culpepper, Helen _ Meriwether 

Dismuke, Ruth Calhoun 

Drake, Sara _ _ _ _ _ Clarke 
Dye, Nona _ _ _ South Carolina 
Edenfield, Eloise _ _ _ Screven 
Glass, Marion _____ Henry 
Grant, Mrs. Sue _ _ _ Raburn 

Hall, Lillie Mae Richmond 

Hardman, Ouida _ _ _ _ Clarke 
Harris, Eleanor _ _ _ _ Florida 
Harrison, Elizabeth _ _ Monroe 
Hinely, Selma _ _ _ Effingham 
Jones, Nell Madison 



King, Mary W. _ _ _ Putnam 
Marks, Sara ______ Jasper 

Minter, Martha _ Chattahoochee 
Moody, Emily _ _ _ Whitfield 
Moore, Kathryn _ _ _ Whitfield 
Moore, Martha _ _ _ _ Madison 

Phillips, Emma _ _ _ Richmond 
Wallace, Alda _____ Bibb 

Pittman, Geneva _ _ _ Haralson 
Pope, Eva ______ Clarke 

Shivers, Evelyn _ _ _ Randolph 
Smith, Virginia _ _ _ Carroll 
Taylor, Havens _ _ _ Franklin 
Thomas, Lillie Mae _ _ Oconee 
Turner, Amy L. _ _ _ _ Jones 

Wise, Eva Mae _ _ Meriwether 
Woodham, Martha _ _ Pulaski 
Wright, Beulah _ _ Taliaferro 

Waits, Grace _____ Jasper 



TRAINING SCHOOL ROLL 



Almond, Musette 
Bishop, Emmett 
Christian, L. H. 
Coker, Lester 
Eidam, Anita 
Fabris, Lala 
Hale, Martha Lena 
Henderson, Ralph 
Kirk, Carrina 
Kenney, John 
Lindsay, Melvin 



First Grade 

Merry, Milton 
Maynard, Virgil 
Mitchell, Constance 
McClure, Mary Frances 
Moseman, Charles 
Nash, Mary Blanche 
Nash, Sarah Ellen 
Spratlin, Willie 
Spratlin, Lillie 
Sims, Rosa Louise 
Sims, David 



STATE NORMAL SCHOOL 



75 



Stevens, Lois 
Timm, Albert 
Upchurch, Harmond 



Allen, Albon 
Brooks, Howard 
Cagle, Harold 
Callaway, Lucy 
Cooksey, Wilbur 
Couch, Earnest 
Davis, Harry 
Doster, Olivia 
Drake, Martha 
Eidson, Robert 
England, Billie 
Fields, Eugene 
Freeman, Bernard 
Hayes, Waiter 



Aaron, Charles 
Almond, Leon 
Boothe, Florence 
Boothe, Martha 
Butler, Martha 
Cagle, Mildred 
Christian, Felton 
Couch, Calvin 
Daniel, Gunter 
Dunaway, Bertha 
Hale, Thomas 
Herring, James 



Anderson, Katherine 
Bishop, Julius 
Boothe, Russell 
Cooksey, Lorene 
Doster, Virginia 
Hill, Ralph 
Moseman, Jack 
McClure, Janet 



Wilson, Elizabeth 
Wilson, Roy 
Warwick, Mary 

Second Grade 

Herring, Albert 
Hill, Reba 
Huff, Thomas 
Jarrett, Robins 
King, Lucile 
Lawrence, Allen Thomas 
Manus, Ishmael 
McLeroy, Henry 
Papa, Treasa 
Sanders, Marie 
Seagraves, Robert 
Stephens, Wadsworth 
Wynn, David 
Yearwood, Nell 

Third Grade 

Matthews, Dwight 
Meade, Roy 
Oldham, Doris 
Oldham, Frances 
Poss, Wilsie 
Pridgeon, Lucy 
Sell, Edward 
Sorrough, Billy 
Thompson, Willie Sue 
Warwick, Ila Mae 
Wortham, Rufus 

Fourth Grade 

Papa, Mary 
Petty, Frank 
Shellerley, Fay 
Whitehead, Carlton 
Whitehead, Winston 
Winn, Louise 
Wood, Edward 



76 



STATE NORMAL SCHOOL 



Fifth Grade 



Almond, Mattie Sue 
Anderson, W. H. 
Christian, Ora Lee 
Drake, Harold 
Edwards, Charles 
Eidson, John 
Hale, Lois 
Hale, Zettie Mae 
Herring, Louise 
Kinney, Helen 



Aycock, Lucile 
Burge, Wilner 
Broach, Claude 
Brooks, Calvin 
Brown, Robert 
Burns, Elmer 
Daniel, Randolph 
Doster, Louis 
England, Katherine 
Eidson, Alice 
Fabris, Thelma 
Fields, Pauline 
Hale, Talmage 
Kenney, Bertha 
Lindsay, Mary Frances 



Anderson, J. T. 
Bevers, Estelle 
Brown, John 
Butler, Joseph 
Chappell, Nelle 
Conyers, Abda 
Dunaway, Alfred 
Doster, Curtis 
Fouler, Frances 
Hale, Therron 
Jones, Vesta 
Kinney, Martha 
Lawrence, Harvey 



Merry, Miriam 
Nickelson, Bertie 
Pollard, Ida 
Poss Hazel 

Satterfield, Cinderella 
Saye, Evelyn 
Vaughn, Aubrie 
Wehunt, Quillian 
Wilson, Harry 



Sixth Grade 



Martin, Emma Sue 
Mitchell, Grace 
Oldham, Grace 
Oldham, Ruth 
Pridgeon, Mary 
Sanders, Mardelle 
Satterfield, Sarah 
Sorrough, Rose Lyn 
Spratlin, Viola 
Scoggins, James 
Veal, O'Dessa 
Whitehead, Eugenia 
Winn, Vivian 
Wortham, Thurman 



Seventh Grade 



O'Neal, Hylon 
Papa, Mildred 
Pound, Stokley 
Ritchie, H. B., Jr. 
Shackelford, Hazel 
Shackelford, Helen 
Slaughter, Nat 
Spratlin, Susie Mae 
Tench, Thelma 
Thrasher, Estelle 
Upchurch, Mary Delia 
Wages, David 
Yearwood, Mary 



STATE NORMAL SCHOOL 



77 



Aaron, Clarence 
Almand, Issac 
Anderson, Ida Bell 
Anderson, Lois 
Bond, Ruth Nell 
Browning, Beatrice 
Davis, Blanche 
Fabric, Agnes 
Huff, Moselle 
Jarrett, Frances 



Bennett, Leanora 
Cagle, Lois 
Craft, Sarah 
Overstreet, Jessie 
Shackelford, Montine 



Beale, Clara 
Brenner, Dorothy 
Calhoun, Mabel 
Coker, Idumia 
Crooke, Ethel 



Eighth Grade 

Johnson, Annie Lene 
Massey, Ethelyn 
Massey, Leonard 
Maddox, Verna Mae 
Mitchell, Daisy 
Nicholson, Louise 
Pope, Mary Jim 
Wallace, Annie 
Worley, Emma Lee 
Wynn, Elizabeth 

Ninth Grade 

Shetterley, Ruby 
Sullivan, Agnes 
Watson, Elizabeth 
Wehunt, Winnie Lee 



Tenth Grade 



Fisher, Lorraine 
Gaines, Helen 
Graves, Zadie Bell 
Phillips, Augusta 



Burns, Elizabeth 
Dellinger, Marshall 
Doster, William 
Flanagan, Horace 
Jennings, Ella 



Burns, Edna 
Cheeley, Harry 
Colvard, Herschel 
Doster, Walter 
Fowler, Pinkie 
Lester, Margaret 



RURAL SCHOOL 

First Grade 

Johnson, Robert 
Nelms, Grace 
Threlkeld, Minnie Lou 
Williams, Hinton 

Second Grade 

Lester, Rufus 
Nelms, B. G. 
Nelms, Mitchell 
Rice, Hope 
Rumsey, Willie 



78 



STATE NORMAL SCHOOL 



Cleveland, Grover 
Dellinger, Garnett 
Dunn, Edward 
Flanagan, Marvin 
Fowler, Louise 
Hamilton, Billy- 
Cleveland, Grover 
Lester, Arthur 



Brackett, Cornell 
Jennings, Cora Belle 
Burns, Telford 
Colvard, Clayton 
Dellinger, Bethie 
Jennings, David 



Driskell, Doyce 
Flanagan, Mary 



Allgood, George 
Doster, Grace 
Driskell, Velma 
Fowler, Alice Nelle 
Lester, Ellie 



Third Grade 

Lester, John Willie 
Lester, Leon 
Maynard, Carlton 
Nelson, Alice 
Rumsey, Una 
Threlkeld, Clate 
Threlkeld, J. B. 

Fourth Grade 

Johnson, Guy Lewis 
Johnson, Jessie 
Lester, Oscar 
Threlkeld, Frank 
Wallace, Tomy 

Fifth Grade 

Lester, Sallie Lou 
Nelson, Mary 

Sixth Grade 

Lester, Teddy 
Maynard, Nellie 
Payne, Donald 
Rumsey, Ruby 



Johnson, Andrew 



Seventh Grade 

Nelson, Ruby 



BULLETIN 



OF 



The State Normal School 

ATHENS, GEORGIA 



Thirty-Fourth Annual Session, 1926-1927 
JANUARY, 1926 



Issued Quarterly by the State Normal School 



Entered .it the Post Office at Athens, <;.i.. .is Second Class Matter, November 
8th, 1913. Under Act of ( ongress of July, L8B6. 



Vol. 13 Serial No. 24 No. 1 




MILLER HALL 



COMMITTEES 



Salaries — Rowe, Snelling, Collum, Brand, Custer, McCall, Johnson, 
Hayes. 

Prudential — Land, Snelling, Rowe, Davison, White. 

Legislative — Cleveland, Custer, Stark, Hayes, McCall, Crawley. 

Uniform — Brand, Yow, McCall, Stark, Farmer. 

Teachers and Course of Study — Land, Yow, Crawley, Smith, Jones, 
Collum, White, Stark, Hayes. 

Finance — Brand, Davison, Cleveland, Custer, Farmer, Johnson. 

Laws and Regulation — Cleveland, Rowe, Larsen, Jones, Farmer, 
Smith. 

Buildings and Grounds — Snelling, Yow, Smith. Rowe, Collum, 
White, Larsen, Stark. 



BOARD OF TRUSTEES AND OFFICERS 



B. S. MILLER, Columbus, Ga President 

Members ex-officio 

Governor Clifford M. Walker Atlanta, Ga. 

State Superintendent of Schools, Fort E. Land Macon, Ga. 

Chancellor, University of Georgia, Charles M. Snelling Athens, Ga. 

Members-at-Large 

Mrs. W. W. Stark Commerce, Ga. 

Mrs. J. E. Hayes Montezuma, Ga. 

Members City of Athens 

A. H. Davison Athens, Ga. 

Mrs. Julia Ashton White Athens, Ga. 

Members Representing Trustees of University of Georgia 

Judge Loyd Cleveland Griffin, Ga. 

H. J. Rowe Athens, Ga. 

Howell Erwin Athens, Ga. 

Members Representing Congressional Districts 

First District, Joseph W. Smith Reidsville, Ga. 

Second District, W. V. Custer Bainbridge, Ga. 

Third District, J. M. Collum Americus, Ga. 

Fourth District, B. S. Miller Columbus, Ga. 

Fifth District, Mrs. Howard McCall Atlanta, Ga. 

Sixth District, Frank F. Jones Macon, Ga. 

Seventh District, Mrs. Annie Freeman Johnson Rome, Ga. 

Eighth District, S. B. Yow Lavonia, Ga. 

Ninth District, L. M. Brand Lawrenceville, Ga. 

Tenth District, Mrs. Ira E. Farmer Thomson, Ga. 

Eleventh District, Jerome Crawley Waycross, Ga. 

Twelfth District, Judge W. W. Larsen Dublin, Ga. 

Secretary and Treasurer 
G. A. Mell Athens, Ga. 



CALENDAR, 1926-27 



1926 

Sept. 7th, Tuesday — School Dormitories open. 
Sept. 7th, Tuesday — Classification of Students. 
Sept. 8th, Wednesday — Classification of Students. 
Sept. 9th, Thursday — Fall Term begins. 
Dec. 23rd — Christmas Holidays begin. 

(Recitations end Wednesday, December 22nd.) 

1927 

Jan. 4th, Tuesday — Re-opening of School. 

Jan. 17th to 22nd — Mid-term Examinations. 

Apr. 17th, Sunday — Founder's Day. 

May 29th, Sunday — Commencement Sermon, at 11:00 A. M. 

May 30th, Monday — Annual Concert, at 8:00 P. M. 

May 31st, Tuesday — Annual Meeting of Board of Trustees, 10 A. M. 

June 1st, Wednesday — Graduating Exercises, at Noon. 



STATE NORMAL SCHOOL 

OFFICERS AND FACULTY 



CHAS. M. SNELLING Chancellor Ex-Officio 

Chancellor of the University of Georgia. 

JERE M. POUND, A.B., LL.D President 

A. RHODES Business Manager 

H. B. RITCHIE Dean 

MRS. H. C. DOOLITTLE Registrar 

MISS FRANCES ROWE Record Clerk 

MISS EMMIE JONES Bookkeeper 

G. A. MELL Secretary and Treasurer 



MRS. GERTRUDE A. ALEXANDER, A.M., 
Expression; Assistant in English. 

MISS PRANCES RANDOLPH ARCHER, 
Librarian. 

MRS. J. W. BAILEY, 
Assistant in Piano Department. 

MISS BESS M. BAIRD, A.M., 
Household Arts. 

MRS. W. E. BROACH, B.S.H.E., 
Assistant, Household Arts. 

PETER P. BROWN, A.M., 
English. 

MISS MaNITA BULLOCH, 
Assistant, Oratory. 

MISS IRIS CALLAWAY, B.S., M.A., 
Assistant in Department of Mathematics. 

MRS. LENA CHANDLER, 
Housekeeper. 

MISS NELLIE COLBERT, 
Matron, Gilmer Hall. 

MRS. A. J. CONYERS, 
Trained Nurse. 



STATE NORMAL SCHOOL 

W. L. COOKSEY, 
Farm Superintendent. 

MISS KATE DOWNS, 
Critic Teacher. 

MISS DAISY DRAKE, 
Critic Teacher. 

MISS LOUISE DRAKE, 
Health. 

WILLIAM T. DUMAS, A.M., Ped. Dr., 
Mathematics. 

DAVID L. EARNEST, A.M., 
Science. 

MRS. AGNES EBERHARDT, 
Piano. 

MISS LAURA ELDER, 
Teacher of Rural School. 

MRS. W. H. ELLIOT, 
Critic Teacher. 

MISS DOROTHY FARGARSON, 
Critic Teacher. 

MISS LOUISE GLASS, B.S., 
Assistant in Science Department. 

MISS EDITH GUILL, 
Assistant in Department of Physical Education. 

MISS LILLIE HENNING, 
Critic Teacher. 

MISS IRMA HICKS, 
Assistant in Department of Household Arts. 

MISS KATE HICKS, 
Principal Elementary School. 

MISS ROBERTA HODGSON, A.M., 
History. 

SCOTT HOLLAND, A.B., 
Assistant, Romance Languages. 



STATE NORMAL SCHOOL 

MISS ANNIE MAE HOLLIDAY, 

Manual Arts. 

MISS ELVA KLEIST, 
Assistant in Household Arts Department. 

MRS. MAGGIE LAMBDIN, 
Matron, Bradwell Hall. 

MISS ADA LAW, 
Assistant, English Department. 

MISS ANNIE LINTON, 

Assistant in Department of Manual Arts. 

JOSEPH LUSTRAT, LL.D., Officer d'Academie, 
Romance Languages. 

FREEMAN McCLURE, A.B., 
Assistant Romance Languages. 

MISS ANNIE V. MASSEY, 
Critic Teacher. 

MISS MOINA MICHAEL, 
Y. W. C. A. Secretary; Matron, Winnie Davis Hall. 

FRANK J. OSTERMANN, A.M., 
Assistant in Department of Manual Arts. 

H. B. RITCHIE, A.M., 
Education. 

MISS BERTHA SAUNDERS, 
Public School Music. 

E. S. SELL, M.S.Agr., 
Agriculture and Rural Social Science. 

MISS FLORENCE SIMPSON, A.B., 
Critic Teacher. 

J. H. SIMS, 
Engineer. 

MISS INEZ SPARKS, 
Critic Teacher. 

MISS HELEN SPROUT, 
Latin and Greek. 



STATE NORMAL SCHOOL 



MISS LULA B. STRONG, 
Physical Education. 

MISS LILLIE THOMPSON, 
Assistant in Department of Household Arts. 

MISS MARY C. TUPPER, 
Assistant Librarian. 

MISS CAROLYN VANCE, B.L.I. , 
Oratory. 

MISS ALICE WALKER, A.M., 

Assistant in English Department. 

MISS MABEL MANNING WEDGE, 
Voice. 

MISS SARAH WEBB, Ph.B., 
Assistant in Department of Education. 

MISS THELMA WILSON, 
Critic Teacher. 

MISS ESTER WOLLA, 
Assistant in Household Arts Department. 

MISS MARY M. WOODS, L.B., 
Assistant in Department of Agriculture and Rural Social Science. 

MISS MAY ZEIGLER, A.M., 
Assistant in Department of Education. 



10 STATE NORMAL SCHOOL 



FACULTY COMMITTEES, 1926-27 



library: Archer, Hicks, Sprout, Brown, Hodgson, Zeigler. 

Calendar and Entertainments: Linton, Eberhardt, Rhodes, Callaway, 
Vance. 

Schedule: Alexander, Callaway, Ritchie, Sell, Dumas. 

Promotion and Publicity: Sell, Earnest, Holliday. 

Curriculum: Brown, Ritchie, Alexander, Sell, Linton, Badrd, Sprout, 
Dumas, Strong. 

Publication: Sell, Brown, Holliday. 

School Organizations: Ritchie, Strong, Sell, Earnest, Michael, Col- 
bert. 

Classification: Dumas, Brown, Ritchie, Sell, Alexander, Callaway, 
Webb. 

Aiumni-ae: Hicks, Callaway, Wilson, Guill, Webb, Walker, Downs, 
Vance. 

Welfare: Rhodes, Conyers, Strong, Baird, Drake, and Matrons. 

Grounds and Buildings: Rhodes, Sell, Hicks, Lambdin, Colbert. 

Employment: Earnest, Hicks, Ritchie, Baird. 

Records: Dumas, Webb, Linton, Holliday, Sprout, Guill, Wolla, 
Kleist, Law. 

Uniform: Baird, Thompson, Archer, Strong. 

Absence: Earnest, Webb, Dumas. 



STATE NORMAL SCHOOL 11 

HISTORICAL 



The Trustees of the University of Georgia donated to the State 
the building known as Rock College and from six to ten acres of 
land contiguous thereto, together with the late George R. Gilmer 
fund. Under the condition of Governor Gilmer's will, this sum 
must be used to train teachers in the elementary branches of an 
English education only. The condition attached to these gifts of 
the Trustees of the University was that the State should establish 
at Rock College a Normal School for the education and training of 
teachers for the rural schools. 

An Act was passed by the Legislature of Georgia in 1891: 

"To establish, organize and maintain a State Normal School as a 
branch to the University, to appropriate money for the same, and 
for other purposes." This Act received the approval of the Gov- 
ernor, October 21, 1891. By the provision of this Act, the State 
received from the Trustees of the University, as a donation for the 
purpose of establishing a Normal School, the building known as 
Rock College and a tract of land of not less than six nor more than 
ten acres upon which the college building stood, lying just outside 
the limits of the City of Athens, Ga. The Act also provided for a 
Normal School Commission, consisting of the State School Com- 
missioner, who should be the Chairman, the Chancellor of the Uni- 
versity, and "three citizens of Georgia, experienced in teaching, to 
be appointed by the Governor." 

It is interesting to note that the water used by the School came 
from a well, and the water was declared to be pure and wholesome 
and was so cold that no ice was needed. 

The lower floor of Rock College was divided into lecture rooms, 
restaurant, hall and assembly rooms. The second and third floors 
were used as a dormitory. These rooms were furnished by the ap- 
propriation of S500.00 from the City Council of Athens in 1892, 
with wire cots, tables, chairs, buckets and other necessary articles 
of 'furniture. 

The Act creating the State Normal School was passed in 1891, 
and short sessions of the school were held during the summer 
months of 1892, 1893 and 1894. The Commission had at its com- 
mand only the interest of the Gilmer fund which was transferred 
for safe keeping to the Trustees of the University by the Trustees 
of the estate of the late George R. Gilmer. The interest on this 
fund amounted to SI, 050. 00 a year, from which a commission of 
$50.00 a year was deducted for the expense of administration. In 
1892 there were added to this, the Peabody Institute fund of 



12 STATE NORMAL SCHOOL 

$800.00, and the County Institute fund of five counties, which met 
at Rock College for one week, and amounted to $125.00. There- 
fore, the iSchool iwas carried on in 1893 with the sum of $1,923.00. 

The session of 1892 began July 11th, and lasted seven weeks. 
Exclusive of the attendance during the County Institute week, the 
roll of students numbered 112, representing thirty-two counties. 

So far as the resources of the college for the year 1893 are con- 
cerned, they are ibest explained by an extract from the minutes of 
the Commission at their meeting in Atlanta, April 1, 1893: 

"The Chairman made a statement of the efforts that had been 
made to induce the Legislature to appropriate a sum of money for 
the permanent establishment of a iState Normal School, and stated 
that the Legislature had (failed to make an appropriation for the 
purpose named. Dr. William E. Boggs then stated that the net in- 
terest on the Gilmer fund, amounting to $1,000.00, would be avail- 
able on the first day of July. He said, also that the people of Athene 
were desirous of having the Normal School operated during the 
coming summer, 1893, and that the grand jury of Clarke county 
had, at his request, made an appropriation of $400 for the purpose. 
The citizens of Athens had also made up a private subscription of 
$537 to ibe added to the fund. These resources, added together, 
made a total of $1,937 for the summer session of 1893." 

The private subscriptions from the citizens of Athens were se- 
cured by Dr. Edwin D. Newton and Mr. T. W. Reed. This must 
have been a tedious undertaking, for many of the subscriptions 
only amounted to fifty cents. 

The session of 1893 ibegan July 5th, and lasted six weeks. There 
were enrolled 116 students from thirtynfive counties. These pupils 
were not all present at the same time. (Some came for a week, 
others for two weeks, others for a month, while many remained 
during the entire session. 

The nature of the work done during the sessions of 1892 and 
1893, the enthusiasm ofl the students, the apparent demand for an 
enlarged and well-equipped Normal School, induced the Normal 
School 1 Commission to appeal to the Legislature of 1893 for an ap- 
propriation to remodel, equip, and operate the State Normal School. 
The Legislature, however, took no action in the matter, and the 
Normal School Commission was again left with limited means to 
carry out the provisions of the Act creating the School. 

A meeting of the State Normal School Commission was held in 
Atlanta to take into consideration the work of the Schooi for the 
summer of 1894. 

The Chairman of the Commission stated that the Legislature had 
made no appropriation for the support of the School during the 



STATE NORMAL SCHOOL 13 

year of 1894, and that the only money available was the interest on 
the George R. Gilmer fund. 

After some discussion, the Commission decided to open the col- 
lege for a month during the summer of 1894, and the following 
resolution was passed: 

"Resolved, That the State Normal School at Rock College be 
opened for one month during the summer of 1894, beginning from 
the 17th day of July, and that the interest on the Gilmer fund, 
accruing July 1st, be used for defraying the expenses of the ses- 
sion." 

Another resolution was also passed and was as follows: 

"Resolved, That the Normal School Commission, recognizing the 
generosity of the grand jury of Clarke county, the City Council and 
citizens of Athens in the aid they have hitherto given the Normal 
School, and fully grateful for their past favors, yet in view of the 
urgent necessities of the School, respectfully suggest to the grand 
jury that an appropriation for the year 1894 would greatly aid in 
continuing the prosperity and insuring the success of the Normal 
School." 

"Resolved, That Dr. William E. Boggs, Professor David Barrow, 
Jr., be requested to present this resolution to the next session of 
the grand jury." 

The grand jury received the resolutions, and in their presentments 
made an appropriation of $750.00 to the State Normal School, pro- 
vided a session of eight weeks was held. This provision was 
cheerfully agreed to by the Commission, and the day of opening 
of it-he Normal iSchool for 1894 was changed from July 17th. to 
July 5th. 

The State Normal School enrolled 175 students during the sum- 
mer of 1894. Fifty-one counties were represented in this student 
body. 

The success of the summer session under the direction of Mr. 
Lawton B. Evans made a permanent Normal School a necessity and 
the Legislature of 1894 gave financial assistance to the School and 
fixed the annual appropriation at ten thousand dollars. 

It was peculiarly fitting that Captain S. D. Bradwell was chosen 
as the first president of the State Normal School, after it was per- 
manently established. Probably no man had done more for the 
teachers of the State, and no one understood their needs better, or 
sympathized with them in their work more. He was possessed with 
a remarkable memory for names and faces, and while State School 
Commissioner, he probably knew more men in Georgia than any 
other man. This fact was an invaluaible aid to Captain Bradweh in 
getting the School established. 



14 STATE NORMAL SCHOOL 

The school was opened April 17, 1895. The 17th of April was 
observed as Founder's Day for many years in the school and ap- 
propriate exercises were conducted. 'Miss Mamie Mathews of Ogle- 
thorpe co\mty was the first student to register in the school. The 
attendance during the spring was very small, but the summer 
months ibrought a much larger enrollment. 

Captain S. D. Bradwell tendered his resignation as President of 
the School at a meeting of the Commission held March 7, 1901. 
Mr. E. C. Branson was elected to succeed Captain Bradwell. Cap- 
tain Bradwell had ibeen President since the permanent organization 
of this institution in 189 5, during the short period of six years, 
under his administration the School was organized and had, grown 
to such an extent that the annual enrollment was well above six 
hundred. 

In 1912 President E. 'C. Branson resigned to accept the head of 
the department of Rural Economics and Sociology, and Mr. Jere 
M. Pound was elected President. 

1. Gilmer Hall. 

This building was erected in 18 60 by the University of Georgia 
and was donated to the .State (Normal School in 1891. At first the 
Normal School was completely housed in this one building but it is 
now used exclusively as a dormitory. It was named for Governor 
Gilmer, as the income from a fund left by his will was used to help 
found the iState Normal School. 

2. Bradwell Hall. 

In 189 6 this building was completed as a two-story structure and 
the third floor was added in the following year, and was made pos- 
sible through subscriptions by the teachers in the school. At first, 
part of the lower floor was used as a dining hall and the other part 
of the building was used as a dormitory for young men. It is used 
entirely now as a girl's dormitory. It was named for the first presi- 
dent of the school. 

3. Old Auditorium. 

In 1898 from appropriations of that year, the commission au- 
thorized the erection of this building. It is two stories high, with 
an auditorium on the first floor and class-rooms above. 

4. Winnie Davis Memorial Hall. 

The Daughters of the 'Confederacy planned this ibuilding to per- 
petuate the memory of Winnie Davis, daughter of Jefferson Davis, 



STATE NORMAL SCHOOL 15 

and it was through their efforts that this hall was built. It was 
completed in 1902 and is used as a dormitory. Various Chapters 
of the Daughters of the Confederacy maintain rooms in the build- 
ing and make appointments of the students to occupy the rooms. 
Rooms are secured in the building by applying to Chapters who 
have furnished the different rooms. 

5. Muscogee Elementary Training School. 

George Foster Peabody gave the money to build and equip this 
building and it was completed in 1902. A, well organized school of 
seven grades is carried on in this building to give the Senior class 
practice in teaching before they are allowed to graduate. The 
building was so named because Muscogee is Mr. Peabody's native 
county. 

6. Smith Building. 

This building was completed in 1906. It was made possible 
through gifts by James M. Smith, George Foster Peabody, the 
State, Faculty, and a number of small contributors. It contains 
class-rooms and the administrative offices, and was named for the 
late James M. Smith. 

7. Dining Hall. 

The dining hall was also completed in 190 6. The first floor of 
this building is used as a dining hall while the second floor is 
known as Senior Hall and is used as a dormitory. 

8. Carnegie Library. 

This building was given by Andrew Carnegie to the State Normal 
School and is of course used as a library. It contains about ten 
thousand volumes, and was erected in 1910. 

9. The Rural School. 

This is a modern one-room rural school building on the campus 
to give the Seniors practice in teaching in a country school. The 
building is well lighted and heated and complete in every detail. 
The children come from the country thus making it a rural school 
from every point of view. It was built in 1911. 

10. Dairy Barn. 

This structure ia of concrete, modern and sanitary in every way, 
with a large silo made at one end. It was built in 1914 and is 
large enough to accommodate seventy cows. The school farm is 



16 STATE NORMAL SCHOOL 

located on the Oconee river three miles from town. This farm 
was purchased, equipped, and ia operated without a cent from the 
State. 

11. Infirmary. 

The infirmary was built in 1916 as a result of the efforts of the 
Elijah Clarke Chapter of the Daughters of the American Revolu- 
tion, although the funds were furnished by this Chapter in co- 
operation with the General Assembly. 

12. Practice Home. 

This building was used as an infirmary until the new one was 
built in 1916. It was converted into the practice home where the 
students get practice in home making, thus putting into practice 
things studied in the class-room. 

13. Miller Hall. 

With an appropriation from the State this dormitory was com- 
pleted in 1917. This is a two-story structure and is modern in 
every respect. It is named in honor of Mr. B. S. Miller, President 
of the Board of Trustees. 

14. Pound Auditorium. 

This building was also finished in 1917, as an appropriation 
amounting to $100,000 from the State was sufficient to build Mil- 
ler Hall and the Pound Auditorium. It has an auditorium that 
will seat 2,500 people; as well as a nuimber of class-rooms and 
offices. This auditorium is named for the President of the School. 



GENERAL CONDITIONS OF ADMISSION 



The purpose of this 6chool is to "educate and train teachers for 
the common schools of Georgia." The terms of admission are as 
follows: 

First: The applicant must ibe sufficiently mature and sufficiently 
well prepared to undertake the work of the school successfully. All 
students, when admitted are considered upon probation at all times; 
and, when unwilling or unafole to do the work required, they will 
'be privately counseled to withdraw. 

Second: This institution is a vocational school, not a reforma- 
tory. We have no punishments. All trifling with rules and regu- 



STATE NORMAL SCHOOL 17 

lations or careless, indifferent, and improper conduct will suibject 
the offender to the necessity of withdrawing. Only students with 
a serious purpose are 1 desired; and only such will, he permitted to 
remain. Students in training are supposed to be mature enough 
to he responsible and our dealings are with them, not with their" 
parents. 

Third: Good Moral Character. Every student will he required to 
hand to the President a letter of recommendation from some re- 
sponsible party in the home neighborhood. 

Fourth: Good Health. This school is delightfully situated in the 
Piedmont Hills. The conditions of health here cannot be surpassed. 
But in order to protect our students as carefully as possible we 
have always on duty nurses of the very highest training, whose 
business will be to constantly inspect the dormitories and to ex- 
amine all the students personally for all evidences of sickness and 
ill health. Moreover, all students are subjected to a rigid physical 
examination on arrival; and all defects noted are watched and the 
student is advised how they must best be removed. 

Fifth: Applicants for admission to the school must bring a letter 
from the home physician certifying that the applicant is in sound 
health and has not been exposed to any contagious disease within' 
the previous thirty days. See blank for this purpose, next to last 
page. This letter must be presented upon arrival. 

Sixth: Successful vaccination is also another absolutely neces- 
sary condition of entrance. All students upon arrival will have 
their arms examined by a physician; and if they do not have a satis- 
factory scar, they must be vaccinated at once before they can be 
admitted to the school. In all cases it is better for applicants to be 
vaccinated before coming here, provided it can be done with fresh, 
pure vaccine points. 

These last two conditions are so imperative, and will be adhered 
to so rigidly, that the applicant who neglects them will be neces- 
sarily subjected to great trouble in entering the school. Plainly 
and emphatically, these things must not ibe neglected by any appli- 
cant. 
Registering. 

Upon reaching the school, the student should go at once to the 
office of the Registrar and fill out a registration blank properly. 
This blank is then taken to the Dormitory Manager's office where a 
Dormitory Room Ticket will be obtained. All moneys and fees 
should at once be paid at this office and receipts secured for same, 

The Classification Committee will meet the students in various 
class-rooms for all asignments. A directory of where these com- 
mittees may be found will he posted in conspicuous places in the 



18 STATE NORMAL SCHOOL 

corridors of the academic buildings. In order to be properly classi- 
fied at once, the student should bring letter of introduction, health 
certificate, and all reports from former schools and teachers. 

Boarding Department. 

All dormitories are steam-heated, with toilet rooms and bath on 
every floor abundantly supplied with hot and cold water. They are 
•comfortable, pleasant, and healthful homes (for the students. All 
o,l our dormitories are the equal of the best dormitories in all mat- 
ters of convenience and comfort. Students in each dormitory are 
under the care of a resident matron, who looks after their needs and 
comiforts. The dining hall is well equipped. 

Board in the dormitories includes room, table fare, heat, lights, 
and attendants for the rougher work. 

Each student will pay for, and look after her own laundering, 
with the assistance of the matron in charge. 

Each student must bring a pillow, pillow-cases, ibed-clothes (in- 
cluding at least one white spread), towels, hair-<brush and comb, 
•and other personal toilet articles; also a bath-robe, bed-room slip- 
pers, overshoes, wrap and umbrella. 

Each student should bring also one cup and caurcer, one dinner 
«plate, one knife, fork and teaspoon, for personal use in the dormi- 
•tories, when such things are necessary. It is against the rules 
€or any student to carry out or (borrow dishes and silver from the 
dining-room. 

Male students do not room in the dormitories. Rooms are rented 
•for them near the campus and paid for by the school. Such stu- 
dents pay the same rate ifor board as outlined in the catalogue, 
furnishing bedding, etc., just as the girls do. 

Parents and friends visiting students cannot be accommodated 
in the dormitories, as there is no room for them. They can secure 
fooard in the city. 

Assignment of Rooms. 

Rooms are not assigned until the opening of school in the fall. 
This work cannot be done during the summer, except the rooms in 
■the Winnie Davis Memorial Hall and these are secured through 
various Chapters of the Daughters of the Confederacy. Students 
that arrive on the first day of the opening of school have a better 
•chance of securing rooms where they want them. 

Expenses. 

Terms for Board (payalble in advance, as indicated). 



STATE NORMAL SCHOOL 19 

Sept. 9th, 1926 — First Payment $ 37.50 

Nov. 11th, 1926 — Second Payment 37.50 

Jan. 25th, 1927 — Third Payment 37.50 

Mar. 29th, 1927 — Fourth Payment 37.50 

$150.00 
Matriculation Fee (To be paid on entrance) 10.00 

Board for students who do not make the quarterly payments as 
indicated aJbove, will be at the rate of $4.50 per week, $1.00 per 
day. 

All students entering before September 15th, will be charged 
from date of opening (Sept. 7th). Those entering on, and after 
Sept. 15th, will be charged from the date they enter school. 

No tuition is paid by Georgia students. iStudents from outside 
the State are required to pay $40.00 per year; $20.00 upon entrance, 
and $20.00 at the 'beginning of the second semester. 

If advisable at any time to raise or lower the rates for board or 
matriculation fee, the rights to do so is reserved. 

Money deposited on dormitory account will not be refunded. 

Money deposited on personal account may 'be withdrawn at any 
time. No part of the Matricualtion fee will be refunded for any 
reason. 

Checks for board or tuition should not be made payable to the 
President, 'but to the student. 

Students must supply their own text-ibooks. Books will be fur- 
nished at publishers' prices with cost of handling added. A second- 
hand book-store is also operated for the ibenefit of the students, 
who wish to buy or sell secondhand books. 

The school has a farm of 215 acres, which is well equipped to 
furnish supplies for the dining-room. 
Uniforms. 

To promote economy, simplicity, and good taste in dress, every 
young woman in the school, unless especially excused by the Presi- 
dent, is required to purchase and wear the uniform adopted by the 
school. Requests to be excused from wearing the uniform will not 
be considered except for very exceptional and unusual reasons. 

The uniform consists of the following articles: 

For church and street wear — a (blue serge suit and cap, white 
waist, tan gloves, black shoes and hose. 

For class room wear — a blue serge suit skirt, uniform waist of 
white poplin, blue Windsor tie. 

For summer and evening wear — a white poplin wash skirt and 
white waist. 

The suit, cap, gloves, white skirts and tie may be ordered by mail 
'before the student leaves home. Unless placed in advance, the order 
must be given immediately upon arrival at the school. The white 



20 STATE NORMAL SCHOOL 

waists for school , church, and evening wear must be made of the 
material and according to the patters designated in the accom- 
panying leaflet giving detailed descriptions. 

The above requirements will be rigidly enforced. There must 
be no attempt at evasion or partial violation of these regulations. 
No other articles, however similar can be substituted for these 
specified. 

Students are expected to wear the uniform at all times both on 
and off the campus. They need not bring to the school dresses of 
other kinds, for it is desired that the uniform be worn on all oc- 
casions. This uniform is pronounced by all experts who have ex- 
amined it as the cheapest, neatest, completest and best uniform 
prescribed (by any institution in the South. 

Uniforms must be kept in good condition. The enforcement of all 
regulations with regard to the uniform is within the authority of 
the matrons of the several dormitories. Students may be required 
to buy new garments whenever in the judgment of the President 
and the matrons it is deemed necessary. 

(Students must net sell or give cast off uniform garments to per- 
sons living in the vicinity of Athens. 

The uniform skirt, cap, and white waist should be worn for for- 
mer students when returning to the school in September. All stu- 
dents must wear the uniform as a traveling dress at all other 
times. 

It is very desiranle that uniforms ibe ordered before leaving 
home and worn when coming to Athens. A detailed description 
and order 'blank will be furnished upon request made to the 
Registrar. 

COURSES OF STUDY 

NORMAL DIPLOMA (Academic) 

First Year 

Hours 

Education 1 — Psychology and 3 — Child Psychology 3 

Education 2 — Principles of Teaching 3 

English 1 — Rhetoric and 2 — Shakespeare 3 

Music — Public School Music 1^4 

Manual Arts — Blackboard Illustration 1% 

Rural Social Science 1 — Rural Economics 1% 

Public Speaking 1 !^ 

Physical Education 2 

Health 1 

Required 15 

Elect three hours from t\e fallowing: 

History 1 — American Government Problems 3 

Mathematics 1 — Plane and Spherical Trigonometry 3 



STATE NORMAL SCHOOL 21 

Foreign Language: Latin 1, Horace and 2, Livy — Greek 1 
— Frenqh 1 — Spanish 1 3 

Science 1 — Physics 3 

Total 18 

Second Year 

Hours 
Education 4 — History of Education and 5 — School Manage- 
ment and iSupervision 3 

Education 6 — Practice Teaching and Conference 3 

English 3 — The Elements and Kinds of Literature 3 

Music — Public School Music iy 2 

Agriculture 1 — Agronomy 1V 2 

Public Speaking 2 1 y 2 

Rural Social Science 2 — Rural Sociology 1V 2 

Physical Education 2 

Health 1 

Required 15 

Elect three hours from the following: 

History 2 — Contemporary American History 3 

Mathematics 2 — Elementary Analysis 3 

Foreign Language: Latin 3, Cornelius Nepos and 4, Ovid; 

Greek 2; French 2; Spanish 2 3 

Science 2 — Inorganic Chemistry 3 

Total 18 

NORMAL DIPLOMA (Husehold Arts) 
First Year 

Education 1 — Psychology and 3 — Child Psychology 3 

Education 2 — Principles of Teaching J 

English 1 — Rhetoric "and Shakespeare 3 

Science 2 — Inorganic Chemistry 6 

Household Arts 6 — Elementary Dressmaking ^l 1 ^ 

Household Arts 1 — Food Study and Cookjw^^T 1 V 2 

Household Arts 4 — Textiles 1% 

Elementary Design 1^ 

Physical Education 2 

Health 1 

Total 18 

Second Year 

Education 6 — Practice Teaching and Conference 3 

English 3 — The Elements and Kinds of Literature 3 

Household Arts 10 — Physiology and Family Health 1 Ms 

Household Arts 11 — Nutrition 1% 

Household Arts 7 — Clothing Selection and Construction lVz 

Household Arts 2 — Home Cookery and Table Service 1% 

Household Arts 13 — Mome Management Wz 

Household Arts 5 — Special Methods in Teaching House- 
hold Arts 1% 



22 STATE NORMAL SCHOOL 

Agriculture 5 — Poultry and 1, Agronomy 3 

Physical Education 2 

Health 1 

Total 18 

NORMAL DIPLOMA (Fine and Industrial Arts) 

First Year 

Hours 

English 1 — Rhetoric and 2 — Shakespeare 3 

Education 1 — Psychology and 3 'Child Psychology 3 

Education 2 — Principles of Teaching 3 

Chemistry 3 

Fine and Industrial Arts 1 — Drawing 1 and 2 — Home Fur- 
nishing 3 

Fine and Industrial Arts 3 — Mechanical Drawing and 4 — 

Woodword 1 lVfc 

Fine and Industrial Arts 5 — Art History 1 IVz 

Physical Education 2 

Health 1 

(No Electives). 

Total 18 

Second Year 

Hours 

English 3 — The Elements and Kinds of Literature 3 

Education 4 — History of Education and 5 — (School Man- 
agement 3 

Education 6 — Practice Teaching and Conference 3 

Physics 3 

Fine and Industrial Arts 6 — Drawing II and 7 — Art 

Structure I 3 

Fine and Industrial Arts 8 — Bookbinding I and 9 — Pottery I - 1 x k 

Fine and Industrial Arts 10 — Black-hoard Illustration l x k 

Physical Education ! 2 

Health 1 

(No Electives). 



I 



Total 18 

DEGREE COURSES 

A. B. EDUCATION 

Freshman 

Hours 

Education 1, Phychology and 3, Child Psychology] 3 

Education 2, Phinciples of Teaching 3 

English 1, Rhetoric and 2, Shakespeare 3 

Public School Music and Public Speaking 3 

Physical Education ^ 2 

Health 1 

Required 12 



STATE NORMAL SCHOOL 23 

Elect six hours from the following: 

History 1, American Governmental Problems 3 

Mathematics 1, Plane and Spherical Trigonometry 3 • 

Science, Physics 3 

Foreign Language: Latin 1 and 2, Greek 1, French 1, 

Spanish 1 3 

Total 18 

Sophomore 

Education 4, History of Education and 5, School Management-- 3 

Education 6, Practice Teaching and Conference 3 

English, 3 The Elements and Kinds of Literature 3 

Public School Music and Public Speaking 3 

Physical Education 2 

Health 1 

Required 12 

Elect six hours from the following: 

History 2, (Contemporary American History 3 

Mathematics 2, Elementary Analysis 3 

Foreign Language: Latin 3 and 4, Greek 2, Franch 2, 

Spanish 2 3 

Science 2, Inorganic Chemistry 3 

Total 18 

Junior 

Hours; 
Education 14, Educational Psychology and 15, Tests and 

Measurements 3 

English 4, The Novel 3 

Required 6 

Elect nine hours from the following: 
Foreign Languages: Latin 6, Sallust and 7, Tacitus; 

French 3, Spanish 3 3 

History 3, -"Contemporary World History; Rural Social 

Science 3, Economics 3 

Mathematics 3, College Algebra and 4, Analytic Geometry, 
Science 3,HBotany; Agriculture 3, Horticulture and 4, 
Landscape Gardening . 3 

Pu'blic School Music; Public Speaking; Library Methods 3 

Physical Education; Health; Education 17 or 12 3 

Total 15 

Senior 

Education 18, School Administration and 19, School 

Supervision 3 

English 5; The Drama 3 

Required 6 

Elect nine hours from the following: 
Foreign Language: Latin 8, Juvenal and 9, Lucretius, 

French 4, Spanish 4 3 



24 STATE NORMAL SCHOOL 

History 4, Problems in World Politics; Rural Social 

Science 4, ^Sociology; Education 16 or 13 3 

Mathematic 5, Differential and Integral Calculus; Science, 
Zoology; Agriculture 5, Poultry and 6, Economic Ge- 
ography 3 

Public School Music 3; Public Speaking 3; Lihrary Methods 3 

Total 15 

B. S. EDUCATION (Household Arts) 

Freshman 

Education 1 — Psychology and 3 — 'Child Psychology 3 

Education 2 — Principles of Teaching 3 

English 1 — Rhetoric and iShakespeare 3 

Science 2 — Inorganic Chemistry 3 

Household Arts 6 — Elementary Dressmaking 1 % 

Household Arts 1 — Food Study and Cookery 1 V 2 

Household Arts 4 — Textiles 1% 

Elementary Design 1V 2 

Physical Education 2 

Health 1 

Total 18 

Sophomore 

Education 6 — Practice Teaching and Conference 3 

English 3 — The Elements and Kinds of Literature < 3 

Household Arts 10 — Physiology and Family Health 1 *£ 

Household Arts 11 — Nutrition 1 Vz 

Household Arts 7 — 'Clothing (Selection and Construction 1% 

Household Arts 2 — 'Home Cookery and Table Service IY2 

Household Arts 13 — 'Home Management IY2 

Household Arts 5 — iSpecial Methods in Teaching House- 
hold Arts IY2 

Agriculture 5 — Poultry and 1, Agronomy 3 

Physical Education 2 

Health 1 

Total 18 

Junior 

Education 14 — Educational Psychology and 15 Tests and 

Measurements 3 

Organic Chemistry 3 

Microbiology 2 

Economics 3 

Dress Design 1 V2 

Advanced Dressmaking 1 V2 

House Furnishing 1 

Required 15 

Elect 3 from the following: 
Agriculture 3, Horticulture and 4, Landscape Gardening C 



STATE NORMAL SCHOOL 25 

English 4 — The Novel 3 

Physical Education 3 

Pulblic School Music 3 

Total 18 

Senior 

Education 12, 13, 18 or 19 3 

Physiological Chemistry and Dietetics 3 

or 

Textile Chemistry and Millinery 3 

Economics of the Household 1 y 2 

Hygiene of 'Childhood and Adolescence iy 2 

Sociology 3 

Required 12 

Elect six from the following: 

Public Speaking 3 

Art History and Art Appreciation 3 

Agriculture 5 — Poultry and 6 Economic Geography 3 

Public School Music 3 

Total 18 

B. S. EDUCATION — (Fine and Industrial Arts) 

Freshman 

Hours 

English 1 — Rhetoric and 2 — Shakespeare 3 

Education 1 — Psychology and 3 — Child Psychology 3 

Education 2 — Principles of Teaching 3 

Chemistry 3 

Fine and Industrial Arts 1 — Drawing 1 and 2 — 'Home 

Furnishing 3 

Fine and Industrial Arts 3 — Mechanical Drawing and 4 — 

Woodwork 1 1% 

Fine and Industrial Arts 5 — Art History 1 1 Mj 

Physical Education 2 

Health 1 

(No Electives). 

Total IS 

Sophomore 

English 3 — The Elements and Kinds of Literature 3 

Education 4 — History of Education and 5 — (School Man- 
agement 3 

Education 6 — Practice Teaching and Conference 3 

Physics 3 

Fine and Industrial Arts 6 — Drawing 11 and 7 — Art 

Structure 1 3 

1. Rural Economics. 

This course takes up some of the most salient features of the 
rural problems with emphasis on the rural conditions in Georgia 



26 STATE NORMAL SCHOOL 

Fine and Industrial Arts 8 — 'Bookbinding 1 and 9 — Pottery 1 iy 2 

Fine and Industrial Arts 10 — Blackboard Illustration 1% 

Physical Education 2 

Health 1 

(No Elective®). 

Total 18 

Junior 

Agriculture 3 — Horticulture and 4 — Landscape Gardening 3 

Education 14 — Educational Psychology and 15 — Tests and 

Measurements 3 

Fine and Industrial Arts 11 — Drawing III and 12 — Art 

Structure II 3 

Fine and Industrial Arts 13 — Art History II and 14 — 

Architectural Drawing 3 

Fine and Industrial Arts 15 — Woodwork II and 16 — Pottery II_ 3 

Physical Education 2 

Health 1 

Required 15 

Elecet 3 hours from the following: ('See Bulletin) 3 

Total 18 

Senior 

Education 18 — School Administration and 19 — School 

Supervision 3 

Fine and Industrial Arts 17 — Drawing IV 3 

Fine and Industrial Arts 18 — Art Appreciation and 19 — 

Art History III 3 

Fine and Industrial Arts 20 — Bookbinding II and 21 

Architectural Structure 3 

Physical Education 2 

Health 1 

Required 12 

Elect 6 hours from the following: (See Bulletin) 6 

Total 18 

AGRICULTURE AND RURAL SOCIAL SCIENCE 

1. Agronomy. 

This course consists of a study of the various field crops that are 
commonly grown in the South. The composition, the races and 
varieties, breeding or improvement, fertilizers and the enemies of 
the different crops will be considered in relation to their importance 
Laboratory work will be required. 

Three hours per week, one semester. Second year Diiploma. 
Credit: 1% hours. 

2. Animal Husbandry. 

The relation of farm animals to permanent agriculture, the prin- 



STATE NORMAL SCHOOL 27 

ciples involved in feeding, the importance of balanced rations to 
secure the proper developments of animals will be the foundation of 
this course. Later a detailed study will be made of the different 
breeds of cattle, swine, horses and poultry. One period per week 
will be devoted to laboratory work in the study of feeds, testing 
milk, working balanced rations and determining the profitableness 
of certain animals. 

Three hours per week, one semester. Second year Diploma. 
Credit: 1% hours. 

3. Horticulture. 

The propagation of plants, hot beds, cold frames and school and 
home gardening will form a basis ifor this course. In addition 
however, the control of various insects and diseases will be studied. 
Field trips and practical work will be required in order that the 
subject matter may become more vital and real. 

Three hours per week, one semester. Junior. Credit: iy 2 hours. 

4. Landscape Gardening. 

In this course a studj T will be made of the selection of flowers, 
shrubs and trees suitable for different types of homes and school 
buildings. The proper arrangement and grouping of the plants 
will be emphasized. Rural school grounds will be taken up in 
detail. Drawings of school and home grounds will be required. 

Three hours per week, one semester. Junior. Credit: iy 2 hours. 

5. Poultry. 

The breeds of poultry, the care and management, the proper feed- 
ing and the insects and diseases of poultry will form the basis for 
this course. Consideration will be given to the location and con- 
struction of poultry houses. 

Three hours per week, one semester. Senior. Credit: iy 2 hours. 

6. Economic Geography. 

(Suggestions for the teaching of geography will be studied as well 
as the physical conditions of the earth and how these relate to the 
growth, development and welfare of the human race. Such gen- 
eral topics as clionate and natural vegetation, land forms, soils, 
mineral deposits, water and natural environment will constitute a 
large part of this course. 

Three hours per week, one semester. Senior. Credit: 1 M; hours. 
and their effects on rural social life. County and community re- 
ports are made. 

Three hours per week, one semester. First year Diploma. 
Credit: 1 V& hours. 



28 STATE NORMAL SCHOOL 

2. Rural Sociology. 

This course is designed to give an interest and appreciation in 
rural life and rural life problems with emphasis on present ten- 
dencies and future growth in Georgia. The United iStates Census 
reports, and all available state house reports, are used in connection 
with the text book. 

Three hours per week, one semester. Second year Diploma. 
Credit: iy 2 hours. 

3. Economics. 

This course involves a study of the present economic conditions, 
and the necessity of improving these conditions. Economic develop- 
ment; the factors of production; rent and ipresent-day rent problems; 
income; co-operation and credits; marketing; taxation and com- 
merce. 

Three hours per week throughout the year. Junior. Credit: 3 
hours. 

4. Sociology. 

This course takes up a study of the evolution of social condi- 
tions, the relation of physical environment to the several types of 
communities, economic and other causes which underlie changes in 
population, the present condition of communities, and existing 
social organizations, their functions, efficiency and present status. 
The influence of such factors as production, transportation, com- 
munication, land tenure, sanitation, and social, religious and edu- 
cational organizations upon the general welfare of communities, 
the improvement of such influences, and the use of the survey to 
ascertain social needs are topics which receive careful consideration. 

Three hours per week throughout the year. Senior. Credit: 3 
hours. 

EDUCATION 



1. Psychology. 

A course in Psychology from the point of view of educational 
theory and practice. A brief study is imade of physiological psy- 
chology, followed 'by intensive work on the nature and function of 
the mental processes as revealed in human behavior. Through a 
study of perception, association, memory, imagination, reflective, 
thinking, reasoning, judging, attention, interest, feeling, emotion, 
instinct, habit, will and character, the student gains a better un- 
derstanding of the problems involved in the training of children. 

Reading Course Required: Thorndike; James; Dewey; Tichener; 
Angell; Judd; Munsterberg; Breese. 



STATE NORMAL SCHOOL 29 

Three hours per week, one semester. Freshman and First year 
Diploma. Credit: iy 2 hours. 

2. Principles of Teaching. 

The work in this class is intended to be both scientific and prac- 
tical. It is Ibased on the laws of psychology and their use in the 
actual work of teaching. It makes use of modern scientific psy- 
chology and especially of recent investigations. The pupil is ex- 
pected to get practical control of principles by using them. He is 
expected to have his practices based on well understood reasons 
and to be able to modify his practices when occasion demands. 

References: Dewey, School and Society; James, Talks to Teach- 
ers on Psychology; Bolton's Principles of Education; Bagley, Edu- 
cational Values. 

Three hours per week for year. Freshman and First year Diplo- 
ma. Credit: 3 hours. 

3. Child Psychology. 

Attention is given to the foundation of child study in other sci- 
ences, and to the more general, permanent, and practical truths thus 
far revealed by students of children, particularly regarding their 
physical nature, growth, development, abnormalities and defects 
with methods of remedy; tests and measurements, meaning of in- 
fancy; period of childhood; suggestion, habit, moral development, 
influences affecting personality. 

References: Kirkpatriek's Fundamentals of Child Study; Rowe's 
Physical Nature of the Child; King's Psychology of Childhood; 
Sully's Studies of Childhood; Hall's Adolescence; Tyler's Growth 
and Education. 

Three hours per week, one semester. Freshman and First year 
Diploma. Credit: 1V 2 hours. 

4. History of Education. 

A study of the educational ideals, practices and tendencies of the 
past, the great educational reformers, and the principles derived 
from them, the origin and development of modern educational the- 
ory and practice. The course embraces a study or oriental, classi- 
cal, mediavel, and renaissance education, present tenrencies in edu- 
cation, modern school systems, and the American public school. 
Reading course required. 

References: Parker's History of Modern Elementary Education, 
Hoyt's Studies in the History of Modern Education; Graves' Great 
Educators of Three Centuries. 

Three hours per week, one semester. Sophomore and Second 
year Diploma. Credit: 1% hours. 



30 STATE NORMAL SCHOOL 

5. School Management and Supervision. 

This course undertakes to. prepare the student to understand the 
various problems which will arise in connection with the school 
other than instruction. It deals with routine, daily program, at- 
tendance, hygiene conditions, discipline, incentives, coercives, 
records and grading and the teacher's relations to school officers and 
the community. 

References: Dutton, School Management, Foght, The American 
Rural School; Sears, Classroom Organization and Control. 

Three hours per week, one semester. Sophomore and Second 
year Diploma. Credit: iy 2 hours. 

6. Practice Teaching. 

The members of the Senior class are required to do practice teach- 
ing throughout the year in the various grades of the Training 
School and to co-operate in the work of the Rural School under 
the supervision and guidance of the head of the Department of 
Pedagogy and the Principal of the Training School, with the sym- 
pathetic and constructive criticism of skilled critic teachers. Before 
teaching, detailed lesson plans are prepared and submitted for 
criticism. 

Two hours per week throughout the year. Sophomore and Sec- 
ond year Diploma. Credit: 2 hours. 

7. Common School Review. 

Provision will be made to give a rapid review of the common 
school branches to those who need the review. 

8. Conferences. 

The officers of the Department of Pedagogy, the officers and teach- 
ers of the Training School, and all the members of the iSenior class 
meet once a week for conference and discussion of the work of the 
Training Schools and vital educational problems in general. 

One hour per week throughout the year. Sophomore and Second 
year Diploma. Credit: 1 hour. 

9. Term Paper. 

Original investigation of some important phase of education, with 
a written report thereon, is required of members of the Senior 
class. 

10. School Law. 

A course of lectures on the salient provisions of the laws relating 
to the common school systems of the state. 
Special periods. Junior, Senior. 



STATE NORMAL SCHOOL 31 

11. Reading Course and Current Educational Literature. 

In addition to the regular course of study in this department, 
courses of reading are offered, based upon professional material at 
hand in the} pedagogical department of the Carnegie Library of the 
State Normal School. A score or more of current educational Peri- 
odicals coming to the Library form the basis of class conferences 
throughout the Junior and Senior years. 

Special periods. Junior, Senior. 

12. Principles of Secondary Education. 

This course is designed to give an intensive study of the modern 
problems in secondary education. It will include a study of the 
ultimate and proximate aims of high school education, selection and 
presentation of subject matter, plans for the economic use of the 
student's time, and classroom management. It will involve the 
psychology of high school subjects, type lessons, solution of prob- 
lems and practical work. 

Three hours per week, one semester. Senior Elective. Credit: 
IY2 hours. 

13. General Methods of Teaching in High vSchools. 

The course deals with the problems of classroom teaching. It is 
a general methods course for prospective high school teachers and 
supervisors. The following problems are treated: selection and ar- 
rangement of subject matter, economy in classroom management, 
teaching various sulbjects, individual differences, supervised study 
the use of books, laboratory methods, questioning, measuring the 
results oif teaching. Reading and practical work required. 

Three hoursrf per week, one semester. 'Senior. Credit: 1% 
hours. 

14. Educational Psychology. 

This course is designed to acquaint the student with the more im- 
portant laws and principles of psychology as they apply to the edu- 
cative process, and to give a survey of the experimental findings in 
the learning process. Among the topics considered will be: native 
tendencies, habit formation, memory and association, laws of learn- 
ing, individual differences, transfer of training, interference, fatigue 
and the mentally defective and the gifted children. 

Three hours per week, one semester. Junior. Credit: 1 *£ 
hours. 

15. Testing and Measurements. 

This course is planned to give a working knowledge of the more 
important standard tests for measuring the ability and achievement 



32 STATE NORMAL SCHOOL 

of elementary and high school children. Practice in administering 
tests and interpreting results will be an important part of this 
course. Special consideration will be given to the use of standard 
tests in diagnosing, classifying and evaluating the progress of 
children in various school subjects. Intelligence tests, readings, 
laboratory work. 

Three hours per week, one semester. Junior. Credit: 1 % 
hours. Fee, $1.50. 

16. Primary Methods and Supervision. 

This course is designed to benefit teachers Off special classes, 
supervisors and principals. It includes (1) the theory and practice 
of teaching ^beginners; (2) an analysis and demonstration of the 
principal methods; (3) a resume of recent scientific investigation; 

(4) a sketch of the historical development of primary methods; 

(5) the specific qualities essential to success in this type of work. 
Three hours per week, one semester. Senior Course. Credit: 

1 % hours. 

17. Public School Curriculum. 

An intensive study is made of the curriculum of the Elementary 
and Junior High Schools as they are related to social conditions and 
needs. This study includes: the historical development of the course 
of study; basic principles for the selection, grading, and organiza- 
tion of public school subjects; a comparative study o-f curriculums 
from different sections of the United States. Special emphasis is 
placed upon designing pupil activities to meet vocational, social, 
and civic needs. Practical work required. 

Three periods per week, one semester. Junior Elective. Credit: 
IV2 hours. 

18. City, State and County School Administration. 

This is a study of the principles underlying an efficient state school 
system, (both city and county, with special reference to the present 
and future needs of Georgia. Topics studied with include: educa- 
tional surveys; the federal government in public education; school 
funds; school budgets; selection, preparation, certification and im- 
provement of teachers; school libraries; buildings and equipment; 
consolidation; compulsory attendance; free supplies; retardation; 
economy and efficiency. Field work and practical work required. 

Three hours per week, one semester. Senior. Credit IY2 hours. 

19. School Supervision. 

The purpose of /this course is the preparation of supervisors and 
supervising principles. This course considers the problems of the 



STATE NORMAL SCHOOL 33 

superintendents and principles in relation to attendance, organiza- 
tion, classification, marking systems, promotion plans, acceleration, 
retardation, elimination of pupils, records and reports. It will con- 
sider the function of the supervisor, methods of supervision and 
effective devices used by supervisors. Criticism and improvement' 
of instruction and standards for judging instruction. Practical 
work. 

Three hours per week, one semester. Senior. Credit: 1% hours. 

TRAINING SCHOOL 



The Training School is a laboratory of the Normal School. It 
is a well organized department of Primary, Intermediate Junior 
and Senior High School pupils. 

This laboratory serves for teachers, Seniors and Juniors. The 
three distinct purposes of practice, demonstration and experimental 
teaching. 

Juniors are permitted to do observation in the Training School 
and Seniors are required to do four months of actual teaching before 
graduation. 

This work is very carefully supervised by the critic teachers in 
charge of the grades. 

Before any student is permitted to do practice teaching in the 
Training iSchool, the equivalent of academic and professional work 
as given in the Junior class of the State Normal School must be 
satisfactorily completed. 

The course of study in all the grades is in accordance with 
present progressive educational tendencies and is made in co-opera- 
tion with the Department of Education of the Normal School. The 
following is the course of study for the Junior and Senior High 
School. 

Outline of Work for Junior and Senior High School 

Seventh Ninth 

Required Required 

English __________5 English __________ 5 

Math. (Airth.) _______ 5 Algebra __________ 5 

Social Sciences: Hist. Ancient _______ 5 

Geography ________5 Music App. _________ 1 

Amer. History ______ 5 Phys. Ed. 



Science (Hygiene) _____ 5 Bled One or Two 

Music Appreciation _____ 2 Science (Biol.) _______5 

Physical Education _____ 2 Latin ___________5 

Sewing or Woodwork _ _ _ _ 2 Elect <>"<> <>r None 

Dom. Arts _________& 

Fine Arts _________5 



34 STATE NORMAL SCHOOL 

Eighth Tenth 

Required Required 

English __________5 English __________5 

General Math. ______ 5 Plane Geometry _______ 5 

Social Sciences: Hist. Med. and Mod. _ _ _ _ 5 

(English Hist.) _____ 5 Music Appr. _________ 

(Community (Civics) _ _ _ 5 Phys. Ed. _________2 

General (Sciences ______ 5 Elect One or Two 

Music Appreciation _____ 2 Science (Chem.) ______ 5 

Physical Education _____ 2 Latin ___________5 

Cookery or Woodwork 2 Elect One or None 

Eelect one — Dom. Arts _________5 

Latin ___________5 Pine Arts 5 

Physical Geometry _____ 5 Fine_Arts _________5 

Spanish __________5 

French __________5 

Eleventh 

Required 

English __________5 

S. Geom. and Adv. Alg. _ _ _ 5 
Hist. Amer. ________5 

Music Appr. _________ 

Phys. Ed. __2 

Elect One or Two 
Science (Phys.) ______ 5 

Latin ___________5 

Elect One or None 
Dom. Arts ________5 

Fine Arts _________5 

'Spanish __________5 

French 5 

No credit given for less 1 , than two years of any foreign language. 
No elective course given to less than five students. 
Advise continuation of elective throughout four years. 

THE RURAL SCHOOL 



It is our purpose with the model building and modern equipment 
to help in adjusting the rural school to the agricultural and domes- 
tic life of the country; to demonstrate ways in which a rural school 
may he the social center of community life; to adjust the course of 
study to rural conditions and interests; to study the problem of con- 
solidation of schools, to show what may be done by one teacher in 
carrying out a practical course of study; to bring the student-teach- 
ers of the State Normal iSchool in close contact with the actual 
problems of the country school. A schedule is arranged by which 
they may observe the daily work of the school and have practical 
experience in teaching in a country school. 



STATE NORMAL SCHOOL 35 

ENGLISH 



1. Rhetoric and Theme Writing. 

A study of the principles of rhetoric and composition, of the con- 
struction of the short story, the news article, the letter of friend- 
ship and of business, enumerative and suggestive description, the 
expository essay, and the argument. All these forms will be writ- 
ten and criticised in class. 

Three hours per week for one semester. First year Diploma and 
Freshman. Credit: 1V 2 hours. 

2. Shakespeare. 

A careful study of Shakespeare's play with attention to forma- 
tion of plot, character delineation, setting, and interpretation of 
thought. Frequent themes will be written and criticised in class. 

Three hours per week for one semester. First year Diploma and 
Freshman. 'Credit: iy 2 hours. 

3. Elements and Kinds of Literature. 

The entire year is given to a study of poetry, a book of selections 
from the works of. the English poets being used as models. This 
study consists of an analysis of poetry, its elements, scansion, and 
varieties of forms. Occasional exercises in verse writing are used 
for fixing the poetic form in mind. 

Three hours per week throughout the year. Second year Diploma 
and Sophomore. Credit: 3 hours. 

4. English Novel. 

In this course a study is made of the development of the novel 
from the earlier romances and the eighteenth century essay. Rep- 
resentative novels of Richardson, Fielding, Smollet, Austen, Scott, 
Dickens, Thackeray, George Eliot, Stephenson, Reade, Hardy, Kip- 
ling, Cooper, Hawthorne, and Howells, will be read outside of class 
and written reports made to the class from time to time. 

Three hours per week throughout the year. Junior. Credit: 3 
hours. 

5. The Development of the Drama. 

This course includes a study of the History of the Drama: The 
Greek Drama, Latin Drama, French Drama, English Drama; Dra- 
matic Construction; Study of Masterpieces; Antigone; Everyman; 
Marlowe's plays; Ben Johnson's plays; The Rivals; The School for 
Scandal; She Stoops to Conquer; Modern Drama of the English 
School, the French School, the German School, the Irish School, 
the Scandinavian School, the American School. 



36 STATE NORMAL SCHOOL 

Three hours per week throughout the year. Senior. Cerdit: 3 
hours. 

FINE AND INDUSTRIAL ARTS 



A small fee of two dollars is collected for each course to cover 
the cost of matrials, etc. used in this department. 



1. Drawing I. 

Outline and Mass Composition. Illustration. Still Life. Land- 
scape. Lettering. Posters. 

Three double periods per week, one semester. 'Credit: 1% hours. 

2. Art Structure I. 

First principles of design. Illustrations in masterpieces of art 
studied. Original designs. Application. 

Three double periods per week, one semester. Credit: 1 Vz hours. 

3. Mechanical Drawing. 

This is a study of the principles of the art of Mechanical drawing 
and the execution of a series of plates which illustrate these prin- 
ciples. 

Three double periods per week, one-half of one semester. 

4. Woodwork I. 

This is an introductory course in which different processes are 
demonstrated and executed as models or projects. 

Three double periods per week, one-half of one semester. 
Crdit for Fine and Industrial Arts 3 and 4: 1% hours. 

5. Ait History I. 

The history of American Art, through lectures and required read- 
ings. 

Three hours per week, one semester. Credit: iy 2 hours. 

6. Drawing II. 

Perspective. Flower, tree, fruit forms in original compositions. 
Still life. Landscape. Pose drawings. Color theory. 

Three double periods per week, one semester. Credit: 1% hours. 

7. Home Furnishing. 

More advanced work in original design. Application of princi- 
ples of design to original composition. 

Three double periods per week, one semester. Credit: 1 V£ 
hours. 

8. Bookbinding I. 

The processes of case binding and library binding are compared. 



STATE NORMAL SCHOOL 37 

Fundamental principles are studied. A brief history of printing and 
book making is included. 

Three double periods per week, one-half of one semester. 

9. Pottery I. 

This practical course begins with the "coiled" method of the 
American Indian. The Ceramic Art in its relation to beautiful 
home-building is presented. 

Three double periods per week, one-half of one semester. Credit 
for Fine and Industrial Arts 8 and 9: 1V 2 hours. 

10. Blackboard Illustration. 

This course^ includes the study of characteristic features of 
various countries in landscape sketches; panels for calendars; 
blackboard .boarders; holiday decorations; letters; birds; boats; 
log cabins; trees. Mediums used are soft white chalk, charcoal 
and colored chalks. 

Three hours per week, one semester. Credit: \y 2 hours. 

11. Drawing III. 

Advanced perspective. Interiors. Exteriors'. Outdoor sketch- 
ing. Artistic anatomy. Cast drawing. 

Three double periods per week, one semester. Credit: \y 2 
sours. 

12. Art Structure II. 

Art principles applied to home furnishing. Styles of furniture. 
Textiles, pictures and small articles in the home. Color and color 
schemes. Site. Floorpl ans. Styles of domestic architecture. 

Three hours per week, one semester. Credit: iy 2 hours. 

13. Art History II. 

The study of the lives and works of the great masters of painting, 
architecture, sculpture and other arts; leading up to some under- 
standing and appreciation of these lines of great human endeavor. 

Three hours per week, one semester. Credit: iy 2 hours. 

14. Architectural Drawing. 

The art of making plans and elevations, of preparing original 
drawings and of blueprinting is stressed throughout this course. 
The modern bungalo, which continues to arouse much interest in 
the minds of earnest home-makers, furnishes the architectual 
motive for this course. Prerequisite: Fine and Industrial Arts 3 
and 11. 

Three double periods per week, first semester. Credit: 1 *& 
hours. 



38 STATE NORMAL SCHOOL 

15. Woodwork II. 

First principles of furniture design studied from the point of 
view of construction and usefulness. A series of projects suitable 
for the Junior High School will he outlined: models for Manual 
Arts Teacher's use to be made. To develop individuality and ini- 
ative, each student will have the opportunity of completely design- 
ing and constructing one or more articles for the lawn, the home or 
the schoolroom. 

Prerequisite: Fine and Industrial Arts 2 and 14. 

Three douhle periods per week, one semester. Credit: iy 2 
hours. 

16. Pottery II. 

Along with practice in molding with and without the aid of 
molds or the potter's wheel, the manufacture of one oif the products 
of the Ceramic Art is studied in detail. The geographic distribu- 
tion of desirable clays is included. 

17. Drawling IV. 

Advanced drawing and painting. Outdoor work Figure draw- 
ing. Cast drawing. 

Three double periods throughout the year. Credit: 3 hours. 

18. Art Appreciation. 

A study of pictures, sculpture, architecture and other works of 
art with view to a development of appreciation for these things. 
Three hours per week, one semester. Credit: 1% hours. 

19. Art History III. 

This course will consist of further studies in the history of art; 
taking successively the study of the development of the great 
schools of art of various nations. 

Prerequisites: Art History I and II. 

Three hours per week, one semester. Credit: 1% hours. 

20. Bookbinding II. 

Methods of library binding stressed. The preservation and eco- 
nomical heandling of all books used from the Elementary School 
(through the High School p-a considered, Organized groups of 
problems suitable for the Junior High School outlined: demon- 
stration models for instructor's use to be made. Designing and the 
treatment of leathers form a vital part of this work. 

Prerequisite: Fine and Industrial Arts 8. 

Three double periods per week, one semester. Credit: 1% 
hours. 



STATE NORMAL SCHOOL 39 

21. Architectural Structure. 

This course deal s with the complete construction of a definite 
portion of a building in miniature which gives ample opportunity 
for expression in desgn, selection of materials, construction, fin- 
ishing, furnishing and color blending. 

Prerequisite: Fine and Industrial Arts 11 and 15. 

Three double periods per week, one semester. Credit: 1% 
hours. 

HEALTH EDUCATION 



1. Principles of Health Education. 

An introductory course which presents the principles of healthy 
living, and the application of these principles to individual and 
community health. 

One hour a week, throughout the year. Freshman and First year 
Diploma. 

2. Health Teaching. 

This course deals with the program of Health Education from 
the standpoint of the teacher and includes a study of problems and 
methods. 

One hour a week, throughout the year. Sophomore and Second 
year Diploma. 

HISTORY 



1. American Governmental Problems. 

This course includes a study of: principles and functions of Gov- 
ernment; administrative organization in the United States; com- 
parison of Federal, State, and local forms; forms of citizenship 
and sovereignty in leading European states and America; methods 
of popular control and expression of public opinion; parties; nature 
and scope of financial and budgetary method; regulation of com- 
mercial and labor interests; problems of Government reforms. 
First semester. 

This course is applied workings of American government and 
citizenship, and includes development of co-operation; growth and 
application of ideals of liberty and law; principles of business and 
industry; city and country life; problems of union; international 
relations; American and other nations; government control of 
health and disease; labor and industry; water and food supply; 
charity, crime and correction; education. Second semester. 

Three hours per week. Freshman and First year Diploma. 
Cedit: 3 hours. 



40 STATE NORMAL SCHOOL 

2. Contemporary American History. 

This course is based on a review of the nineteenth century of 
United States history; forming of the Federal Government; par- 
ties; the Westward movement; sectionalism; slavery; the Civil 
War; reconstruction; contemporary history and industrial era; 
growth of trusts and laibor organizations; United States as a world 
power; international relations; banking, currency, and credit; the 
characteristic features of Americanism. 

Three hours per week throughout the year. Sophomore and 
Second year Diploma. Credit: 3 hours. 

3. Contemporary World History. 

This course will embrace a study o fthe causes and conduct of 
leadership in the great war; military and diplomatic causes; colo- 
nial conflicts in Africa; racial and political conflicts in the Balkans; 
•balance of power, conduct of Europe; German hegemony and pan- 
German ideals; outbreak of war; modern methods of warfare; 
military movements on all fronts; origin and history of peace move- 
ments; past peace conferences, aims and results; peace negotia- 
tions; Paris-Versailles conference; claims; attempted political and 
economic settlements; treaties; League of Nations; disarmament 
conference; international relations. The course purposes to train 
the students in the proper interpretation of acts and events of our 
own times, to discover and understand history in daily newspapers 
and periodicals, and to form logical and clear conclusions. 

Three hours per week throughout the year. Junior. Credit: 3 
hours. 

4. Problems in World Politics. 

Development of state governments; internal and international 
problems of government; international law; nationalism; and 
world policies. Political intrigues and alignments of the Great 
Powers in war, and in peace. Alliances; diplomacy; international 
conferences; and treaties. Colonial and imperial problems. Work 
of the organization and the League of Nations. 

This course aims to guide the students to a clear grasp of present 
national and international relations and policies. Documents and 
treaties must be studied and interpreted and reported on in writ- 
ing. The student will be urged to use the best current publications 
available in libraries. 

Three hours per week. Seniors. Credit: 3 hours. 



STATE NORMAL SCHOOL 41 

HOUSEHOLD ARTS 



Uniforms of Cookery Classes. 

Every girl taking cookery is required to have at least three 
full length all white aprons, two hand towels and two pot holders. 
These articles should be made and brought from home ready for 
use at the 'beginning of the term. 

Fees. 

A fee sufficient to cover the necessary expenses is charged in 
classes where laboratory work is done. These fees are paid at the 
beginning of the semester. 

1. Food Study and Cookery. 

The subject matter of this course will deal with the source, com- 
position, selection, preparation and cookery of typical foods used in 
the home and in the teaching of elementary cookery. It will also 
deal with the application of the general principles of cookery to a 
wide range of food materials. 

This course is fundamental for all teachers of cookery. 

Three laboratory periods per week, one semester. Credit: 1 % 
hours. 

2. Home Cookery and Table Service. 

The purpose of this course is the application of the general 
principles of cookery to the preparation of menus and meals for 
the home. It also includes the study and execution of different 
forms of table service as applied to different types and meals and 
special occasions. Practical problems are provided for the plan- 
ning, purchasing, preparation and serving of food for groups under 
pressure of economy of time, money and effort. 

Three laboratory periods per week, one semester. Prerequi- 
site: Home Economics 1. Credit: 1% hours. 

8. Adavanced Cookery. 

Complex processes of cookery and Demonstration Cookery. Also 
special study of management problems in quantity cookery for tea 
rooms, school and college lunch rooms, hospital dietary depart- 
ments and in other types of food service for large groups. Oppor- 
tunity for students who desire to obtain practice in giving special 
demonstration in various phases of scientific cookery. 

Prerequisite: Chemistry and Cookery 1 and 2. Two laboratory 
periods and one recitation. Credit: 1 1 - hour V $6.00. 



42 STATE NORMAL SCHOOL 

10. Physiology and Family Health. 

This course deals with the structure and function of the human 
organs of digestion, absorption, circulation, respiration, metaiblism, 
and exertion, etc., and their relation to human nutrition and pub- 
lic hygiene. Practical lessons in home nursing are included. 

Three hours per week, one semester. 

11. Nutrition. 

This course presents the fundamental principles of human nutri- 
tion and their application to the feeding of individuals, families 
and school groups under varying physiological and economic con- 
dtions. iSpecial emphasis is placed upon the proper diet for in- 
fants and young children. The selection of subject matter, the 
adaption of material and methods of presentation for elementary 
and high school pupils are discussed. 

Three hours per week, one semester. Prerequisite: General 
Chemistry, Home Economics 1, 2, and 10. 

12. Dietetics. 

This course deals with the requirements of the individual 
thoroughout infancy, childhood, adolescence, adult life and old age, 
in the light of chemistry and physiology of digestion; the energy 
value of food, the nutrition properties of proteins, fats, carbohy- 
drates, ash constituents and vitamines. Typical dietetics are planned 
for each period, and the problem of satisfying diverse requirements 
in families and other groups is considered, with special regard to 
economical and social conditions. 

Prerequisite: Organic Chemistry and Home Economics 1, 2, and 
10. 

(>. Elementary Dressmaking. 

This course includes the fundamental processes of elementary 
sewing. Emphasis is placed on selection of materials with relation 
to design, utility, durability, and cost; and the care and repair of 
clothing. Simple garments are made for which both drafted and 
commercial patterns are used. Good technique and high standards 
of workmanship are stressed. 

Three laboratory periods per week, one semester. Credit: 1% 
hours. Fee, $2.00. 

7. (lot lung Selection and Construction. 

Pattern construction and alteration with application in silk and 
wool problems. Emphasis is placed upon the choice, care and cost 
of materials and suitable accessories, including selection, care and 
construction of simple hats. 



STATE NORMAL SCHOOL 43 

Three laboratory periods per week, one semester. 'Credit: 1% 
hours. Prerequisite 4 and 6. 

4. Textiles. 

This course comprises the history and development of textiles, 
the study of fibers, and the identification of fabrics; with emphasis 
on those points which affect thef appearance,wearing qualities, 
prices and uses of materials. Correlation of subject matter is made 
with other clothing subjects. 

Three ihours per week, one semester. Credit: iy 2 hours. 

8. Applied Dress Design. 

A survey of the individual and social conditions which have in- 
fluenced the design of costumes in different countries; a study of 
fundamental principles of composition, line, dark and light, and 
color harmony, and problems involving the use of these principles. 

Three laboratory periods per week, one semester. Credit: 1 *£ 
hours. Fee, $2.00. Prerequisite: Home Economics and Elemen- 
tary Design. 

9. Advanced Dressmaking. 

This course includes practice in draping and modeling original 
designs. Practical work developed largely in muslin and tissue 
paper. Final problem will be an afternoon dress. Emphasis is 
placed on clothing methods for the high school. 

Three laboratory periods per week, second semester. Prerequi- 
site: Home Economics 8. Credit: iy 2 hours. 

5. Millinery. 

Approached from the standpoint of design. The practical prob- 
lems are developed in various materials in relation to costume and 
occasion. 

Three laboratory periods per week, one semester. Credit 1 V 2 
hours. 

13. Home Management. (Diploma Course). 

This course is designed to give the students actual practical 
experience and skill in the organization and management of the 
home, to test the ability of the student, and to set social relations 
and standards. It consists of class discussions and problems based 
on problems arising in Practice House administration. Every Home 
Economies student receiving a diploma or a Degree is required to 
live in the house at least thirty days. 

Three hours per week, one semester. Credit: 1 V 2 hours. 



44 STATE NORMAL SCHOOL 

15. Special Methods in Teaching Home Economics. 

A professional course consisting of lectures and class discussions 
designed to meet the needs of students majoring in Home Eco- 
nomics. A general survey is made including the study of the 
history, of organization, and promotion of Home Economics and its 
articulation of subject matter, courses of study and equipment for 
special types of schools. Special stress is made upon the needs of 
the school and community groups. 

Three recitations per week, one semester. 'Credit: 1V 2 hours. 

17. Economics of the Household. 

(Open to .Senior Academic Students.) 

This course presents the economic and social problems of house- 
keeping and home-making. It deals with the organization and 
control of family and personal life through the economic relations 
of the household. The family income and the regulation of ex- 
penditures, standards of efficient living and methods of saving, etc., 
are included. 

Three hours per week, one semester. 

18. Hygiene of Childhood and Adolescence. 

(Open to Senior Academic Students). 

This course presents a brief review of heredity and prenatal in- 
fluence; consideration of eugenics; application of biologic principles 
in the care of infancy and childhood and the relation of physical 
welfare to other values in the life of a child. It includes the sig- 
nificance and value of the lengthened period of immaturity in the 
human species; adolescent development with normal and abnormal 
characteristcs; and education for parenthood involving sex-hygiene 
and sex-education with other factors. 

Three hours per week, one semester. (Credit: iy 2 hours. 

15. Personal Regimen. 

A study of the college girl and her needs. It includes points on 
how to select nourishing food, how to dress appropriately, the care 
of the person, how to spend money and time efficiently and the 
etiquette of every day life. 

Open to Academic Students. Three hours per week one semester. 
Credit 1 % hours. 

LATIN 

1. Horace. 

Selections from Odes, Satires and Epistles. Papers are re- 
quired on the Augustan Period, Roman customs and social life. 

Three hours per week throughout the first semester. Freshman 
or First year Diploma. Credit: iy 2 hours. 



STATE NORMAL SCHOOL 4 5 

2. Livy. 

Selections from Livy. 

Three hours per week throughout the second semester. Fresh- 
man or First year Diploma. Credit: 1% hours. 

3. Cornelius Nepos. • 

Three hours per week throughout the first semester. Sophomore 
or Second year Diploma. Credit: 1V 2 hours. 

4. Ovid. 

Selections from the Metamosphoses and Tristia. This course in- 
cludes a study of the most important classic myths. 

Three hours per week throughout the second semester. Sopho- 
more or (Second year Diploma. Credit: 1 % hours. 

5. Teachers Course. 

Pronunciation, forms, syntax, prosody, the art of translating. 
methods of instructions, texts. 

Prerequisite: Latin 3 and 4. 

Three hours per -week, one semester. Electives for Juniors and 
Seniors. 

6.«<Sailust. 

Three hours per week throughout the first semester. Junior. 
Credit: 1% hours. 

7. Tacitus, Agricola and Gemiania. 

This course includes a study of life in western and central Europe 
in Roman times. 

Three hours per week throughout the second semester Junior. 
Credit: iy 2 hours. 

S.'Muvenal : Satires. 

Three hours per week throughout the first semester. Senior. 
Credit: 1% hours. 

0. Lucretius: I)e Rerum Xatura. 

Three hours per week throughout the second semester. Senior. 
Credit: 1% hours. 

Latin 1, 2, 3, 4, or their equivalent required as prerequisite tor 
the last four courses. 

LIBRARY METHODS 



This course will include a study of the classification and cata- 
logue of the Normal School Library, the uses of encyclopedias, in- 



4 6 STATE NORMAL SCHOOL 

dexes to periodical literature and general reference 'books during 
the fall term. The spring term will include the organization of a 
school library, simple methods of accessioning, classifying and cat- 
aloguing, selection and .buying of books. 

Three hours per week throughout the year. Junior or Senior. 
Credit: 3 hours. 

MATHEMATICS 



1. Plane and Spherical Trigonometry. 

This 'sulbject will deal with trigonometric functions of an acute 
angle and the use of natural functions and logorithms in the solu- 
tion of the right triangle; functions of any angle and the sum or 
difference of two angles; triginometric equations; the oblique 
triangle; applications in exercises and problems; the right spehrical 
triangle and applications. Should time permit, the course will in 
elude original problems based on angle measurements made toy the 
student. 

Three hours per week throughout the year. Freshman and First 
year Diploma. Credit: 3 hours. 

2. Elementary Analysis. 

This course consists of one semester's work in elementary analytic 
geometry, and one in elementary calculus. 

The analytic geometry embraces co-ordinate systems; the curve 
and the equation; the straight line and the circle; curve plotting; 
functions and graphs; common and natural logarithms; problems, 
etc. 

The calculus includes differentiation; slope, tangent and normal; 
maxima and minima; rates; differentials; applications; a brief 
study of intergration with examples and applications to rates, areas 
and volumes. 

Three hours per week throughout the year. Sophomore and Sec- 
ond year Diploma. Credit: 3 hours. 

3. College Algebra. 

This course will embrace quadratic, irrational, and higher equa- 
tions; ratio, proportion, and variation; the progressions; the bino- 
mial theorem; permutations and combinations; limits; infinite se- 
ries; exponential and logarithmic series; determinants; and the 
theory of equations. 

Three hours per week, one semester. Junior. Credit: 1 V£ 
hours. 

4. Analytic Geometry. 

A more advanced course than that given in 2. In addition to 



STATE NORMAL SCHOOL 47 

the topics treated in 2, this course will include polar co-ordinates; 
the transformation of co-ordinates; the properties of the parabola, 
ellipse, and hyperbola; tangents and normals; and the analytic 
geometry of space. 

Three hours per week, one semester. Junior. Credit: 1% hours. 

5. Differential and Intergral Calculus. 

In this course a careful study will be made of differentiation, 
limits, analytic and geometric applications, curvature, application 
of the derivative in mechanics, curve tracing in Cartesian and polar 
co-ordinates. 

The work in the integral calculus will embrace the indefinite 
integral; the definite integral; formulas for integration; natural 
and irrational fractions; binomial differentials; trigonometric and 
definite integrals; series; geometric applications; differential equa- 
tions; mechanical applications. 

Three hours per week throughout the year. Senor. Credit: 3 
hours. 

MUSIC 



1 .Public School Music. 

The teaching of sight reading and the fundamentals of the theory 
involved is the aim of the work of this year. The first part of the 
year's work is devoted to correct singing tone and the reading of the 
simple one part melodies. Later, two part and three part music 
is taken. During both Junior and Senior years all are encouraged 
to collect material of current musical events. Occasional four 
minute talks and illustrations on subjects relative to increasing 
appreciation and understanding of the best music and composers 
varies the usual and the more technical character of the class 
work. 

Three hours per week, one semester. Junior. Credit: 1 M> hours. 

2. Public School Music. 

Application of correct teaching methods of music to children is 
the main purpose of this year's work." A general consideration of 
problems in music encountered by the ordinary grade teacher is 
made with a view of complete survey of the attainments in a 
course of study expected for each grade as a standard of accom- 
plishment. The child voice and help for the vocally deficient La 
studied and song material acquired. Work in more advanced sight 
reading is continued. The privilege of electing music for a practise 
teaching subject and observation of lessons taught in the Elementary 
Practice School is a great aid in this year's work. 

Three hours per week, one semester. Senior. Credit: 1 V2 hours. 



48 STATE NORMAL SCHOOL 

3. l*ublic School Music. 

Advanced sight reading; methods for primary and intermediate 
grades including the explicit problems of each grade, song material 
and appreciation of listening lessons. A course of study by the 
year, months and weeks with material used is made for each grade. 
Organization and conducting of school bands and orchestras is also 
given. 

Three hours per week throughout the year. Junior Degree 
Course. 'Credit : 3 hours. 

4. Public School Music. 

Advanced sight reading and fundamentals of harmony. Methods 
for the upper grammar grades and high school with the accompany- 
ing detailed course of study and explicit material to be used in each 
grade is studied. Type demonstration lessons suitable for the use 
of supervisors in instruction of grade teachers are also planned. 
Principles involved in choral work and their direction are applied 
practically in the Senior chorus organization as described elsewhere. 
This disposition of changing boys' and girls' voices and other char- 
acterises of adolescence as bearing on the music course of those 
grades is a matter of particular importance and receives the study 
due it as such. 

Three hours per week throughout the year. Senior Degree 
Course. 'Credit: 3 hours. 

5. Senior Chorus. 

The entire Senior class is organized for chorus at which practical 
application is made of methods for conducting community singing 
or grade and high school chorus songs. The chorus affords an ex- 
cellent opportunity for those studying public school music with an 
idea of specialization to have a laboratory for experiment and 
practice in choral work. This ds found oif invaluable aid as the 
teachers of today are expected to take active community interests 
outside the school or in it as community center. One formal con- 
cert is given annually by the chorus which includes selections from 
the best classics. 

Piano. 

Realizing the demands for better equipped Instrumental Music 
Teachers, the /State Normal iSchool has added Special Normal Course, 
the olbject of which is to fit the student (at very little cost) to teach 
Instrumental Music. 

Students are not only required to be acquainted with the repre- 
sentative works of the best composers, but must study the theory of 
music, harmony, history and pedagogy, and be able to analyze and 
criticise a musical composition intelligently. 



STATE NORMAL SCHOOL 49 

The standard has been raised, the course carefully planned, and 
the department is well qualified to carry on the work. The advan- 
tages are equal to any music school in the south. 

Students are graded and classified according to their technical 
skill, and their general musical knowledge. They are required to 
bring with them a complete list of studies and pieces, that they 
may be given credit for same. 

Especial attention is given to ensemble playing. The year is 
divided into four terms, nine weeks each. Tuition payable in ad- 
vance at time dormitory fee is due. Piano practice included. Tu- 
tion when once paid will not be refunded. 

Piano, two hours each week, $12.75 per term. 

Harmony, two hours each week, $9,00 per term. 
Voice. 

This course is divided into four terms of nine weeks each. A 
small fee of $18.00 per term is charged. This includes use of piano 
for practice. This takes up the proper placing of the voice, breath 
control, relaxation, phrasing, and song interpretation. Songs of 
the best known composers and study of arias of well known operas 
will be studied. 
Violin. 

Instruction in violin consists of a graded course embracing ele- 
mentary exercises and studies by Hohmann, Wolfhart, and others, 
progressing through Kayser, Books I and II, Mazas, Kreutzer, 
Schradieck Scale Studies Rode, Fiorillo Gavinies and others, with 
pieces by classic and modern composers, according to the proffciency 
of pupil. A candidate for diploma in violin must have studied 
Kreutzer and Rode, and some of the easier concertos and sonatos, 
have a reasonable repertoire of solos suitable for recital purposes, 
and be able to play easy accompaniments on the piano. Require- 
ments for Harmony, History of Music and Ensemible are the same 
as in piano. Post graduate courses will be given on application. 

ORATORY 

The courses in Oratory are designed to develop the students in the 
art of expression through gesture, speech and presence, with the 
special idea of helping those who are to become teachers. 

The methods employed overcome the effects of repression, stim- 
ulate free endeavor, increase "the joy of the working'* and develop 
creative power. Each student is trained to express herself in many 
ways — in story telling, in dramatic personations, in oral composi- 
tion, in platform reading and in literary interpretation. The student 



50 STATE NORMAL SCHOOL 

is taught to think and feel ibefore an audience and to express these 
•thoughts and emotions through her own individuality. 

This results in a natural style, cultivates and refines literary taste, 
strengthens the imagination and develops personal power. Any 
student will find this study invaluable in teaching any other sub- 
ject, because oratory tends to bring poise, freedom from self-con- 
sciousness, a responsive voice and body, a keener imagination, emo- 
tions aroused and directed to the expression of the best on one's 
nature. The following courses are offered to those desiring special 
study in Oratory, and will be given tin one private lesson and three 
class lessons per week. The work is designed to cover a period of 
two years of study. 

A certificate in Oratory will be given to students completing the 
courses as outlined below and also the following subjects: Psychol- 
ogy; History of Education; Principles of Education; Methods; Eng- 
lish; Junior Literature; Psychology; Modern Language; Common 
School Miusic; Art History; Physical Culture. 

A fee of $8.00 per month will be charged students of this 
department. 

t. Literary Interpretation. 

This course involves Evolution of Expression or the fundamental 
principles through which a student develops her powers of expres- 
sion; selections from literature; platform deportment; recitals. 

One hour per week throughout the year. Junior. 

2. Vocal Technique. 

This course deals with articulation: phonetics, speech formation, 
pronunciation, impediments of speech; technique; study and use of 
voice instrument, control of breath, resonance, flexibility, power, 
freedom; expressive voice culture; tone language, exercises empha- 
sizing the cultivation of the imagination to produce^ strong, brilliant 
and expressive voices. 

One hour per week throughout the year. Junior. 

ii. Bodily Expression. 

The aim of Bodily Expression is to train the body to become the 
free responsive agent of the soul's expression. The course deals 
with physiology and psychology of gesture; harmony of action — 
hand exercises; pantomine. 

One hour per week throughout the year. Junior. 

4. Educational Dramatics. 

The great dynamic force, the drama, plays such an important part 
today In the development of the child that serious thought must be 
given to it. We believe, with President Eliot of Harvard, that dra- 



STATE NORMAL SCHOOL 51 

matic instince is a tremendous power over children that ought to be 
utilized for their good. It is the purpose of this course to give the 
student a working knowledge of directing children's plays. Plays 
are studied from the view of reading lesson to the actual public 
presentation. Several Seniors during the year will have complete 
direction of a play, training children of the Elementary School. 
This includes planning and making of scenery and costumes. 
One hour per week throughout the year. Senior. 

5. Story-Telling. 

The most universal method of imparting knowledge and of im- 
pressing moral and spiritual truths is through story-telling. Here 
all knowledge of child psychology is applied and students become 
familiar with every type of story. A "Story Hour" is conducted -by 
Oratory students every Monday. 

One hour per weelk throughout the year. Senior. 

6. Advanced Interpretation. 

This course involves a study of one act plays, the short story, 
and modern poetry. Recitals are given. 

One hour per week throughout the year. Senior. 

PHYSICAL EDUCATION » 



1. Physical Education. 

This course includes fundamentals in tactics, free exercises, cor- 
rective work, light apparatus, folk dancing and games. 
Required of all Freshman or First year Diploma. 
Two hours per week throughout the year. 

2. Physical Education. 

Continuation of work started in Freshman year. Theory and 
practice in games and dances suitable for elementary and grammar 
grades. A fund of material for teaching purposes is collected and 
a special study made of the health manual prescribed by the State 

Board of Education. 

Required of all Sophomore or Second year Diploma. 
Two h our s per week throughout the year. 

3. Physical Education. 

This course includes work in the theory and practice of physical 
education. A study is made of the different systems of gymnastics 
and stress placed upon special methods of teaching physical edu- 
cation. It also includes corrective work, advanced apparatus, danc- 
ing and games. 



52 STATE NORMAL SCHOOL 

Three hours per week throughout the year. Junior and Senior. 
1 Vz hours credit per week for two years. 

4. Athletics. 

The work of this department includes, in addition to the regular 
gymnastics, careful instruction in outdoor games and sports. A 
well ^equipped athletic field is provided for the use of the students. 
A number of Field Days are given during each year, and the victo- 
rious class is awarded the possession of a beautiful loving cup. 

Gymnasium Suit. 

The gymnasium suit adopted by the school consists of white middy 
blouse, black bloomers and black tennis slippers. These articles 
are part oif the school uniform and must be purchased after reach- 
ing Athens. 

PUBLIC SPEAKING 



1. Public SpeaMng 

This course includes lessons in articulation which involves free- 
dom of organs of speech; placement; accurate moulding of the ele- 
ments of speech; pronunciation; also vocal technique which means 
breath control; development of resonance; placing of tones; purity, 
tone, projection, flexibility; compass; smoothness; power, and bril- 
liancy of tones; freedom. Evolution of expression is the basal 
text. 

Three hours per week, one semester. Freshman or First year 
Diploma. Credit: 1% hours. 

2. Public Speaking. 

To some extent, time during this course must be given to meth- 
ods, in order to prepare the students for teaching. This part of the 
work will consist in methods for Primary and Grammar grades, and 
will include lectures, discussions, and practical illustrative exercises. 
Some of the phases of reading studied are: the relation of reading 
to other studies in the curriculum; methods of getting good reading; 
enunciation and pronunciation; phonics; pitch, inflection, modula- 
tion, model work; the development lesson; conduct of the reading 
lesson; emphasis of the importance of good oral reading on the 
part of the teacher. 

Three hours per week, one semester. Sophomore or second year 
Diploma. (Credit: 1% hours. 

3. Public Speaking. 

The work in this course will consist in: Whatever pertains to 
preparing and delivering one's own speeches. Interpretation of 



STATE NORMAL SCHOOL 53 

great speeches, to train practical public speakers. A comprehensive 
study in principles, using masterpieces of oratory, and illustrative 
matter from current affairs, politics, reforms, advertisement, and 
any other subjects of interest. Impromptu and prepared speeches. 
Each student must select a major topic on which he will write 
several speeches. Each student will be required to prepare and de- 
liver lectures on specified teaching problems or subjects. 

Three hours per week throughout the year. Junior or Senior 
Course. Credit: 3 hours. 

ROMANCE LANGUAGES 



1. French. 

Optional with Lation and Spanish for State Normal School diplo- 
ma. A course for beginners which consists of careful drill in pro- 
nunciation, translation, conversation, dictation and the reading of 
easy French texts. No prerequisite. 

Three hours per week throughout the year. Freshman and First 
year Diploma. Credit: 3 hours. 

2. French. 

Optional with Latin and Spanish for State Normal School diploma. 
Prerequisite: French 1 or its equivalent. This course is a continua- 
tion of French 1. It consists of a thorough review of grammar and 
syntax, constant practice in translating English into French, con- 
versation and extensive reading. 

Three hours per week throughout the year. Sophomore and Sec- 
ond year Diploma. Credit: 3 hours. 

3. French. 

Optional to students who have had French 2 or its equivalent. 
This course consists of advanced work in French. Extensive read- 
ing in and out of the class room. Explanation of texts. Rhetoric, 
compositions and essays in French. Conversation, lectures in 
French on literary topics. 

Three hours per week throughout the year. Junior. Credit: 




Prerequisite: French 3 or its equivalent. This is especially a 
course of practice in teaching and is open to students who have 
had the three courses as outlined above, or their equivalent. Of 
the three hours scheduled, two will be given to practice in teaching 
and the other to lectures in French by the Professor. Besides. 
tensive outside reading and reports in French on the books read 
will be required. 



54 STATE NORMAL SCHOOL 

French 3 and French 4 will ibe required for a Baccalaureate de- 
gree of the State Normal School, if French is elected. 
Three hours per week. Senior. Credit: 3 hours. 

1. Spanish. 

Optional with Latin and French for State Normal School diploma. 
A course for 'beginners which consists of careful drill in pronuncia- 
tion, translation, conversation, dictation and the reading of easy 
Spanish texts. No prerequisite. 

Three hours per week throughout the year. Freshman and First 
year Diploma. Credit: 3 hours. 

2. Spanish. 

Optional with Latin and French for State Normal School diploma. 
Prerequisite: Spanish 1 or its equivalent. This course is a con- 
tinuation of Spanish 1. It consists of a thorough review of gram- 
mar and syntax, contant practice in translation English into Span- 
ish, conversation and extensive reading. 

Three hours per week throughout the year. Sophomore and Sec- 
ond year Diploma. Credit: 3 hours. 

3. Spanish. 

Optional to students who have had Spanish 2 or its equivalent. 
This course consists of advanced work in Spanish. Extensive read- 
ing in and out of the class room. Explanation of texts. Rhetoric, 
compositions and essays in Spanish. Conversation, lectures in 
Spanish on literary topics. 

Three hours per week throughout the year. Junior. Credit: 
3 hours. 

4. Spanish. 

Prequisite: Spanish 3 or its equivalent. This is especially a 
course of practice in teaching and is open only to students who have 
had the three courses as outlined ahove, or their equivalent. Of 
the three hours scheduled, two will be given to practice in teaching 
and the other lectures in Spanish by the Professor. Besides, ex- 
tensive outside reading and reports in Spanish on the books read 
will be required. 

Spanish 3 and Spanish 4 will be required for a Baccalaureat de- 
gree of the State Normal School, if Spanish is elected. 

Three hours per week throughout the year. Senior. Credit: 
3 hours. 

SCIENCE 



1. Physics. 

A study of Force and Energy and their relations to Matter; how 



STATE NORMAL SCHOOL 55 

they are applied in present day civilization. The fundamental prin- 
ciples of mechanics; the law of gravitation, sound, light, heat, 
magnetism, electricity and methods of use. Laboratory of interest- 
ing and instructive nature. 

Three hours per week throughout the year. Freshman and First 
year Diploma. Credit: 3 hours. Fee, $3.00. 

2. Inorganic Chemistry. 

A study of the Elements and Compounds more especially indust- 
rial in their nature and applications. Chemical theory and calcu- 
lations, problems and processes. How chemical force combines 
elements into compounds and how these are made servicable to 
man. How progress is dependent upon chemical advancement; 
relation to war and peace and conserves the best interests of our 
race. Extensive laboratory work. 

Three hours per week throughout the year. (Sophomore and Sec- 
ond year Diploma. Credit: 3 hours. Fee, $3.00. 

3. Botany. 

Plant liife in relation to environment; structure and function of 
organs. Propagation, classification and identification of plants. 
Reactions to influences and forces playing upon the plant; adapta- 
tions and uses. 

Three hours per week throughout the year. Junior. Credit: 3 
hours. Fee, $2.00. 

4. Zoology. 

A study of structure in animals in simple and most highly de- 
veloped forms. A close view of animal processes and functions. 
The adaptions of structure to use and environment. The classes 
and orders of animals. The wonder of life, growth, development. 
The origin and end of animated existence. The relationships of 
animals and the meaning of resemblance. A study of man and his 
kindred types. Dissection and other laboratory work. 

Three hours per week throughout the year. iSenior. Credit: .) 
hours. Fee, $3.00. 

5. Organic Chemistry. 

A systematic study of the classification and relation of the carbon 
compounds; a study of the digestion, metabolism and chemica) 
composition of foods. A brief outline of the course includes: 
hydrocarbons, as related to general household processes; acids, as re- 
lated to the study of fats, vinegar, fruits and vegetables; esters, as 
used for flavoring; fats, as to occurence 1 , composition, and re- 
actions. Emphasis is constantly placed on the practical and pro- 



56 STATE NORMAL SCHOOL 

fesslonal side of study. Prerequisite: Inorganic Chemistry; Food 
Study and Cookery 1. 

Three hours per week throughout the year. Junior. Credit: 3 
hours. Fee, $3.00. 

6. Physiological Chemistry. 

This course presents the essential chemical facts pertaining to 
human nutrition including chemical constituents of cells, chemistry 
of foods, digestion, a'bsorption, assimulation, tissue composition; 
excretion. The laboratory work includes experiments and demon- 
strations on ifermentation; respiration; salivary, gastric pancreatic 
and intestinal digestion in relationship to life processes. Prerequi- 
sites: Inorganic and Organic Chemistry. 

Three hours per week. Senior. Credit: iy 2 hours. Fee, $3.00. 

7. Microbiology. 

This course deals with "bacteria, yeasts and molds and other 
micro organisms which affect home and community life. 

Two hours lecture and two laboratory periods one semester. 
Credit 2 hours. 

CARNEGIE LIBRARY 



This building, as indicated by its name, was the gift of Mr. 
Andrew Carnegie. It is well equipped with Library Bureau furni- 
ture and contains about ten thousand volumes with something like 
three thousand pamphlets. The faculty and registered students of 
the school have free acess to the lilbrary and may draw books for 
home reading. To the general pulbliic it is for reference only. 

The Reading Room is of infinite value to the students both for 
general reading and reference work. The following magazines are 
on file: American Cookery, American Journal of Education, Ameri- 
can Magaz/ine, American School Board Journal, Atlantic Monthly, 
Bookman, Century, Country Life, Current History, New York Times, 
Current Opinion, Delineator, Education, Educational Review, Ele- 
mentary School Journal, Good Housekeeping, Independent, Indus- 
trial Arts Magazine, Journal of Education, Journal of Home Eco- 
nomics, Journal of Psychology, Kindergarten and First Grade, 
Ladies' Home Journal, Literary Digest, Manual Training Magazine, 
Missionary Review, Musical America, Nation, National Geographic, 
Nature Study Review, New Republic, North American Review, Nor- 
mal Instructor, Outlook, Playground, Progressive Farmer, Reader's 
Guide to Periodical Literature, Review of Reviews, Saturday Even- 
ling Post, School Arts Magazine, School Century, School and Home 
Education, School and Society, School Review, Survey Teachers' 
College Record, Textile World, Travel, Woman's Home Companion, 



STATE NORMAL SCHOOL 57 

Worlds' Work, Yale Review, Harper's Monthly, Mentor, Hibbert's 
Journal, American City, Woman Citizen. These magazines are 
bound at the end of each school year and prove a most valuable 
aid in the Reference Department. 

The library is open daily (except Sunday) from 8:45 A. M. until 
5:30 P. M., closing for the dinner hour. Books other than "Re- 
serves" may ibe borrowed from the library for two weeks. Re- 
served hooks are issued overnight only. 

It is the main purpose of the library to both create and stimulate 
a taste for good literature as well as serve the various departments 
in their reference work. It is our amlbition to give every student 
of every department a working knowledge of the institution and 
thereby double its value to the student body. 

CORRESPONDENCE STUDY 



General Information. 

The State Normal School offers correspondence to those whose 
duties make it impossible for them to pursue in residence. These 
courses are designed for those who are interested in professional 
growth, . desire guidance or wish to supplement their training. 
These courses are prepared toy the regular members of the Faculty 
and are given in the class rooms of the several departments during 
the regular session. 

Nature of the Work. 

Each course shall consist of as many lessons as the instructor 
may require. Each semester course shall approximate a minimum 
of 200 hours work. Each lesson shall consist of assignments from 
texts, supplementary reading, questions to test the method of the 
work, and the results obtained. 
Credit. 

For each course with the equivalent of a semester's work, the 
State Normal School allows % hour credit. This credit may apply 
towards a diploma or a degree. 

No fractional course can be offered for credit. The full course 
must be taken if credit it to be obtained. 

Admission Requirements. 

The State Normal School wishes to be reasonably sure that a 
student can succeed in the course he desires to take, and it re- 
serves the right to examine his application carefully and before en- 
rollment, to recommend other courses than those selected, or reject 
the application if the statements on his blanks justify such action. 



58 STATE NORMAL SCHOOL 

If the student is not accepted or if he does not wish to change from 
his original choice, his fee will be refunded. 

A student wishing to enroll must not be in attendance in any 
other institution, and must satisfy the entrance requirements of 
the State Normal School. 
Courses. 

No student will 'be allowed to enroll in more than two courses at 
the same time. It is advised that all of the time be concentrated 
on one course. A student is expected to finish the course by end of 
scholastic year. A minimum of one semester is allowed a student 
to finish a course provided he distributes his work evenly. 

Before a student enrolls for a course he must fulfill all the pre- 
requisites required by the instructor. 

The methods of instruction serves to keep the student and teach- 
er in close contact with the work of the course. After preparing 
the lesson the student writes his answers and mails his paper to 
the instructor together with any questions concerning such diffi- 
culties as may have arisen during the study. The instructor cor- 
rects and comments on the paper and returns it to the student. In 
like manner the work goes on until the course is completed. No 
incomplete course will (be given credit. 

Examinations on each course will be give neither at the State 
Normal School or under supervision satisfactory to the State Nor- 
mal School. No credit is given unless an examination is taken. 

If on account of interruptions or delays the course is deferred, a 
fee of ($3.00) three dollars will be charged for extension of time. 

No course is given during summer vacation. 

Credit Value Toward a Diploma or Degree. 

No student may take more than one-third of the work required 
for a diploma or a degree. 

The State Normal School does not grant a diploma or a degree 
for correspondence study work alone. 
Fees. 

All fees are payalble in advance and they should accompany the 
application for instruction. The matriculation fee is $10 and is 
required of all students at the time of their first registration. The 
tuition fee for each semester course is twelve dollars ($12.00). 
The tuition fee includes payment for instruction, sent for return of 
lesson papers. 

No fees will be returned after the work has begun. 
Enroll. 

Application blanks will be sent on request. 

A student may begin a course for which he has been accepted at 
any time which will allow the work to be completed by end of 



STATE NORMAL SCHOOL 59 

scholastic year. It is advised that application be made in September 
and February. 

Fill out the application blank, enclose a money order made pay- 
able to President Jere M. Pound, and address to President Jere M. 
Pound, State Normal School, Athens, Ga. 

LECTURE COURSES 



The school maintains a Lyceum Course which is free to all the 
students of the school and in which are engaged the ibest platform 
performers we can procure. In addition to this, a series of lectures 
by prominent men and women in the state, who have accomplished 
things in the special line of work in which each is interested, is kept 
up throughout the year. 

Moreover, Athens affords the school wonderful opportunity for 
seeing and hearing those who have attained distinction along many 
lines of endeavor. The school, in fact, is at times embarrassed with 
the richness of its opportunities of this kind. From time to time 
such men as Dr. Campbell Morgan, Mr. George Foster Peabody and 
others of national reputation speak in the auditorium. But they 
are invaluable aids in giving finishing touches to the education 
which the school is striving to impart to its student body. 

MOTION PICTURES 



Motion pictures are frequently used by the various teachers to 
supplement their class-room instruction. This method of teaching 
has proven to be both interesting and instructive. 

The moving picture machine is also used by lecturers who visit 
the school and at such times when the students are not otherwise 
engaged some of the hest popular films are shown. 

TYPEWRITING 



The following courses are offered to those who are specializing to 
become teachers in the Kindergarten, the Elementary, the Junior 
High or the High Schools of the state. They arc not commercial 
courses in any sense of the word. Instead, they are of a type that 
hundreds of prospective teachers, ambitious to command the big- 
gest positions, are demanding. 

1. Course A. 

Offered to those who have no knowledge of the touch method of 



60 STATE NORMAL SCHOOL 

typewriting. This is a basic course in correct practice of advanced 
material at the outset. 

2. Course B. 

Candidates who can write thirty words per minute, without 
errors, are eligible. Stress is placed on the vital importance of 
typewriting as a tool in the hands of student, teacher or social 
worker. A certificate is issued to all students who pass examina- 
tions satisfactorily and can write sixty words per minute. College 
credit can be arranged for this course. 

3. Course C. 

Prerequisite Course B. The psychology of learning and teaching 
of typewriting (method), the learning curve of transfer values 
are presented. Regular practice in the use of the dictaphone is 
introduced throughout the entire course. 

4. Course D. 

Offered to all ambitious individuals who can write seventy-five 
words per minute for a period of fifteen minutes without making any 
errors. In this course speed, as well as accuracy, is stressed. 
Greater efficiency in the use of the dictaphone is required. All stu- 
dents passing the one hundred word tests at the typewriter and the 
dictaphone receive a diploma. 

A small fee for each course is required, payable in advance. 

STUDENT ORGANIZATIONS 



1. The Young Women's Christian Association. 

The Young Women's Christian Association, through its social life, 
Vesper services, Morning Watch, Bible study, mission study, church 
attendance and intercollegiate relationships, seek to promote the 
spirit of Christian thinking and Christian living among students 
and to train them for Christian work. 

The Social Work consists in aiding new students to harmonious 
adjustment to the school life and its activities. 

The Course in World Fellowship is carefully planned and the 
text books used are the newest and best, treating both home and 
foreign mission problems. 

Intercollegiate relationships have been established by delegations 
to the Georgia Students Volunteer Union, the Southern Conference 
of the Young Women's Christian Association, by visits of traveling 
student secretaries, delegates to the Normal Student Volunteer 
Convention, Cabinet training councils, visiting Secretaries of the 



STATE NORMAL SCHOOL 61 

churches and W. C. T. U., and by the interchange of reports and 
methods with other associations. 

Church attendance is emphasized in order that the students may 
derive all the spiritual benefits possible from the excellent church 
facilities of Athens. 
2. Bible Study. 

The purpose of this course is to give such a general knowledge 
of the Bible as will furnish to the students a backfround for future 
work in detail. 

The lessons are arranged for systematic daily readings through 
the Bible, beginning with Genesis. Weekly lessons are held on 
these readings, bringing out such points about the great Book as 
every person ought to know. 

The aim of the teachers in presenting these lessons is to bring 
the students into loving acquaintance with God's Word. This course 
covers four years. 

The First Year's Course embraces the Law and History of the 
Hebrew Nation as found in the Bible from Genisis to Esther in- 
clusive. 

The Second Year's Course is a study of the Poetry and Prophecy 
of the Bible, beginning with the book of Job and extending through 
the Old Testament. 

The Third Year's Course is the Life of Christ, or the historical 
study of the four Gospels. The lessons are so arranged as to bring 
together the corresponding parts of the four Gospels for comparison. 
There is no attempt made to study these parts critically, but simply 
to present the facts as given by the four writers. 

The Fourth Year's Course is a study of the Acts of the Apostles, 
of the Epistles, and of Revelation. 

The course is entirely optional, but all students are encouraged 
to join one of these classes, and due recognition is given their work 
in the permanent records -of the school. 

The Bible classes are taught by members of the Faculty. 

The State Normal School won second honor in this work in the 
United States at the Panama Exposition Young Women's Christian 
Associational National Contest in 1915. 

There has been an interest in the memorizing of Schripture pre- 
scribed by Helen Gould Shepherd, for which she presents a Student's 
Bible. The school has won 246 of these Bibles. This was discon- 
tinued in 1921. 

Since 1922 Mrs. Gertrude Alexander has been giving the Campbell 
Morgan edition of the Bible. Bringing our number to 260. 

Students are urged to keep in their respective classes in Bible 
work as in other studies. 

The State Normal School won first honor in the United 9tat< 



62 STATE NORMAL SCHOOL 

the Student Association Honor Roll at the Panama Exposition for 
the largest average in production to total enrollment in Mission 
Study and Social Welfare classes in 1915. The School won second 
honor places in the two subjects that follow: volunteer Bible Study- 
classes and attendance on religious services. 

3. The Woman's Christian Temperance Union. 

In connection with the Young Woman's Christian Association 
work of the school, there is an organized Woman's Christian Tem- 
perance Union which holds regular meetings once per month and 
endeavors to further the study and interest in the Temperance 
Cause. 

4. Altioria Literary Society. 

At one time there was only one society in the State Normal 
School. On account of the overwhelming number of members it 
was advised that two societies be formed. In 1905 the two literary 
societies, under their new names, Mildred Rutherford and Alitoria, 
began their work anew. Professor Earnest gave use our name 
"Altioria," meaning higher and 'better. Since the date of our birth, 
under the aim and excellent prevailing spirit of our motto, "Ex- 
celsior," we have been growing each year, striving .for the supernal 
and superior things in our school life. The aim of the Altioria So- 
ciety is the advancement of scholarship by enjoying together the 
best to be found in literature and the development of "Ideal Woman- 
hood" through faithfulness and usefulness to our school and to 
our fellows. 

5. The Mil died Rutherford Literary Society. 

The aim of this society is to develop the literary phase of the 
student life through the creation of an interest in and appreciation 
for literature, music and art. The betterment of the social life of 
the school is the result of the activities of this organization and it 
is in this connection that some of the closest friendships are formed 
which exist not only while in attendance here but the influence of 
which will be felt into the future. 

An example of the highest type of womanhood is set before the 
girls in the sponsor of the organization.lMiss Mildred Ruthenford, 
whose fine and noble character and the Ideals for which she stands 
are ever a 'beacon light to those who know her. 

(>. A' Alliance Francaise. 

One of the distinctive features of the French course is the oppor- 
tunity of the students to affiliate 'with the L'Alliance Francaise, an 
organization composed of those familiar with and interested in the 
French language both in this school and the other educational in- 



STATE NORMAL SCHOOL 63 

stitutions of the city. Meetings are held once a month, at which, 
time prominent French scholars address the organizations on some 
topic of general interest. This organization has been a means of 
creating a greater interest in and a wider knowledge for the French 
language. 

The Honorary President of the L' Alliance Francaise (Athens 
group) is Chancellor D. C. Barrow of the University, and the Pres- 
ident, Professor J. Lustrat, head of the department of Romance 
Languages at the University and at the Normal School. 

7. Glee Club. 

The purpose of this organization is recreative choral work as well 
as to afford an opportunity for the study of classical compositions. 
Membership is open to any memiber of the student body. The or- 
ganization gives two cencerts annually and assists at other functions 
of the school. 

8. County Clubs. 

Nearly every county in Georgia is represented at the State Normal. 
Many of these counties have enough students to organize and there 
are more than twenty county clubs. There are a number of benefits 
to be derived from these clubs. Among the most important are — a 
definite way to study home county and home conditions; a united 
band to aid in the development of county affairs; a splendid way for 
those from home to get together; a medium to interest other stu- 
dents in the school; a course of greatpleasure and leisure. These 
clubs are doing splendid, constructive work. More counties are to 
be organized and it is the aim of all of them to* keep up the supply 
of memlbers from year to year and to be of real service to the 
people at home. 

9. The Round Table. 

The Round Table is a gathering of all students who desire to 
attend at a regular meeting ever Saturday night just when supper 
is over. The organization is nine years old and its aim is to fur- 
nish wholesome recreation and to develop a love for and a power to 
tell the best stories to be found in our literature. Current topics 
are discussed, songs rendered and some pleasing story told and 
commented on. This organization started with but six members 
at its inception, and now has increased in size until there is no 
room on the school campus that will hold tin* attendance without 
crowding. 

10. Athletic Association. 

The Athletic Association is an organization of the students to 
promote and encourage outdoor sports and athletics and is under 



64 STATE NORMAL SCHOOL 

the direct supervision of the Department of Physical Education. 

The Association has a well-equipped athletic field, with courts 
for tennis, basketball, volley ball and other games. Field Days and 
various athletic contests stimulate interest in outdoor activities and 
provide sane, wholesome recreation. 

11. Aluinni-a/e Association. 

The Alumni-ae Association of the State Normal School is an or- 
ganization concerned with the welfare of the school and its alumi- 
ae, and with the professional advancement of education. It is the 
channel through which the school and its alumni-ae can be of 
mutual help to each other. Its purpose is to provide a scholarship 
fund, to promote loyalty to the school, and to disseminate the ideals 
for which the school stands. 

All graduates of the school are active members of the Association 
and all persons, who have at any time been students of the school, 
are associate members. 

The officers of the Association are as follows: President, Kate E. 
Hicks; Secretary, Iiiis Callaway; Treasurer, Mrs. H. C. Doolittle. 

12. Reflex. 

The Reflex is the student paper. It is issued in newspaper style. 
It is printed twice a month. All general school news; society 
dots; editorials; literary society pages; Y. W. C. A. notes and jokes 
from the basis of its development. The editors are elected from 
the student body. They do all the writing for the paper under the 
supervision of a faculty member. 

13. Crystal. 

The Crystal is the Senior Annual. Every Senior class publishes a 
Crystal. The book appears at the end of the year. It is a memory 
book in printed form. The editors are elected from the Senior 
class. 

STATICS FOR 1925-26 

Registered students to date (December 17, 1925), 595; students 
registered during Summer School, 445; pupils in Muscogee Elemen- 
tary School and Country School, 248. Total, 1,288. 

Teachers and officers, 61; counties represented by the students, 
126; students holding diplomas from other schools, 4 89; students 
holding license to teach, 73. Fifty percent of all our students are 
the sons and daughters of farmers. 

The total registration since the foundation of the school, 16,857, 
more than 90 percent of whom have since taught in our common 



STATE NORMAL SCHOOL 



65 



schools. Total graduates to June, 1925, 2,634. Graduating class 
this year numbers 260. 

Buildings: Academic buildings, 4; Dormitory buildings, 4; Dining 
Hall and Senior Hall building, 1; Rural School, 1; Carnegie Li- 
brary, 1; Infirmary, 1; Practice Home, 1; Dairy Barn, 1; Stock- 
Barn, 1; Total, 15. 

ROLL OF STUDENTS, 1925-26 



Senior 
Name County Name County 

Adams, Annie _ _ Merriwether Michels, Betty _ _ _ Chatham 

Adams, Grace _ _ Meriwether Moon, Louise _____ Walton 

Garrett, Mary E. _ _ _ Walton Parks, Beatrice _ _ _ _ DeKalb 

Hancock, Ethel _ _ _ _ Clarke Sholar. Alice ______ Hall 

Hubbard, Evelyn _ _ Franklin Tidwell, Ethel _ _ _ _ Douglas 

Joiner, Frances _ _ _ Laurens Whatley, Victoria _ _ _ _ Macon 

Lazarus, Daisy _____ Glynn Wood, Christine _ _ _ Coweta 

Mann, Martha _ _ Meriwether 

Junior 

Christian, Mary _ _ _ _ Newton Kinney, B. C. _ _ _ _ _ Lincoln 

Hays, Helen _______ Lee Quattlebaum, Fay _ _ _ Barrow 

Holliday, Annie Mae _ _ Clarke Smith, Dorothy L. _ _ _ Dodge 

Sophomore 

Dennard, Mattie B. Wilkes Tribble, Louise _ _ _ _ Gordon 

Fields, Louise _____ Turner Vieth, Rebecca _ South Carolina 
Martin, Sara Avis _ _ _ Bartow 

Freshman 

Allen, Lily _______ Pike Joiner, Alma _____ Laurens 

Brown, Jewell _ _ _ Meriwether Ponder, Grace _____ Floyd 

Brown, Lutie _____ Oconee Pricket, Esther _ _ _ Jackson 

Claxton, Iris _____ Laurens Taylor, Havens _ _ _ Franklin 

Collins, Elizabeth _ _ _ Schley Wade, Minnie _ _ _ _ Brooks 

Culpepper, Eleanor _ Meriwether Wilson, Mable _ _ _ _ Laurens 

Gresham, Pauline _ _ _ Morgan Wright, Amy _ _ _ _ Laurens 

Second Year Diploma 

Amis, Julius _____ Clarke Bacon, Emily _ _ _ ©glethorpe 
Anderson, Marie _ _ _ Jefferson Bacon, Mildred _ _ _ Tattnall 
Andrews, Mary Alice _ Oconee Bailey, Mary L. _ _ _ _ Troup 
Arnow, Grace _ _ _ _ Camden 



66 



STATE NORMAL SCHOOL 



Name County 

Baldwin, Prances _ _ _ Terrell 
Ballard, Bessie _ _ _ Putnam 
Banks, Bertie _ North Carolina 
Bennett, Sara _____ Clarke 
Blackmon, Allene _ _ _ Wilkes 
Boland, Althea _ _ _ Muscogee 
Boling, Ola Mae _ _ Habersham 
Bostwlick, Alice _ _ _ _ Morgan 
Boiwden, Eloise _ _ _ Muscogee 
Boyd, Obeda _____ Clarke 
Boyette, Maude _ _ _ Randolph 
Boyle, Marie C. _ _ _ Chatham 
Brantley, Leslie _ _ _ Laurens 
Breed! ove, Martha _ _ Walton 
Bridges, Bertha _ _ _ Madison 

Broach, Mrs. Ruth T. Clarke 

Brooks, Li Hie _____ Clarke 
Burrell, Veta Mae _ _ _ Towns 

Caldwell, Olene _ _ Pike 

Callaway, Irene _ _ _ Whitfield 
Camplbell, Louise _ _ _ _ Peach 
Cargill, Lillde Mae _ _ Chatham 
Carpenter, Ivan _ _ _ _ Elbert 
Carswell, Lucile _ _ _ _ Clarke 
Castleberry, Frances _ _ iSumter 
Chapman, Lydia Bell_ Muscogee 
Child.s, Emmalu _ _ _ _ Butts 
Christian, Iris _____ Clarke 
Clements, Frances _ _ _ _ Bibb 

Oocroft, Elizalbeth _ Cook 

Cocroft, Louise _ _ _ _ Morgan 

Coker, Mary Terrell 

Collins, Kittie _ _ _ Dougherty 
Craver, Winnie _ North Carolina 
Culpepper, Florence -Meriwether 
Culpepper, Margaret Meriwether 
Darden, Christine _ _ _ Worth 
Darden, Margaret _ _ _ Worth 

Davis, Lois Muscogee 

Deane, Lola _____ Stephens 
Dell, Caroline _ _ _ _ Sumter 

Dell, Louise _ _ Sumter 

Dillard, Frances _ _ Oglethorpe 



Name County 

Dooly, Rolberta _ _ _ _ Oconee 
Dotson, Mary _ _ _ _ Chatham 
Downey, Eunice _ _ Haralson 
Duffey, Clara L. _ _ _ _ Bibb 
Duncan, Edna _ _ _ Oglethorpe 
Duncan, Nolle _____ Bibb 
Durrence, Jewel _ _ _ _ Evans 
Durrence, Vera _ _ _ Tattnall 
Eason, Daisy _ _ _ _ Wilcox 
Edwards, Evelyn _ _ _ Haralson 
Edwards, Mildred _ _ _ Florida 
Epperson, Elma _ _ _ Barrow 
Fanning, Marcia _ _ McDuffie 
Flannery, Frances _ _ _ Coweta 
Florence, Jimmie _ _ Jefferson 

Fordham, Edith _ Laurens 

Fortson, Louise _ _ _ Muscogee 
Fulcher, Dorothy _ _ _ Florida 
Gartleman, Josephine _ Chatham 

Gilmore, Nellie Joe Turner 

Gilmore, Sara Louise _ Jefferson 

Gill, Ruth _ Meriwether 

Glass, Annie Mae _ _ _ Walton 
Godbee, Esther _ _ _ Tattnall 
Gorham, Marion _ _ _ _ Wilkes 
Gould, Edna _ _ _ _ Chatham 
Griffin, Kathryn _ _ _ _ Decatur 
Grimes, Martha _ _ Washington 
Hale, Eula _____ Walton 
Hall, Guynelle _ _ _ Franklin 
Hancock, Cleo _ _ _ _ Clarke 
Hardie, Ruth _ _ _ _ Monroe 
Hargrove, Marjorie _ Oglethorpe 
Harper, Gladys _ _ _ Morgan 
Harris, Louise _ _ _ Oglethorpe 
Harris, Lowell _ _ _ _ Catoosa 
Harris, Lynda Belle _ _ Terrell 
Hearn, Mildred _ _ _ _ Evans 
Hendley, Sara _ _ _ _ Wilcox 
Henry, Frances _ _ _ _ Clarke 
Hicks, Emily _ _ _ _ Macon 
Hill, Hazel _____ Barrow 
Hill, Mary O. _ _ _ _ Sumter 



STATE NORMAL SCHOOL 



67 



Name County 

Hill, Pauline _____ Barrow 
Hodges, Bessie _ _ _ _ Screven 
Hogan, Mary E. _ _ _ Laurens 

Holcomib, Mary Ella Peach 

Hubert, Virginia _ _ _ Clarke 

Hudson, Juliet _ _ _ _ Harris 

udson, Naomi _____ Bibb 

Huff, Mary _ Oglethorpe 

Humphrey, Rosa _ _ _ Pickens 
Isbell, Virginia _ _ _ Stephens 
Jackson, Frances _ _ Muscogee 
Jackson, Ollilu _ _ _ _ Henry 

Jarrell, Lillian _ _ Meriwether 
Jernigan, Pauline _ _ Seminole 
Johnson, Lucile _ _ _ _ Troup 

Joiner, Jewell _____ Dooly 

Joiner, Myrla _____ Dooly 

Jones, Iola _____ Walton 

Jones, Nora _____ Jasper 

Jones, Ossie Lee _ _ _ Bryan 
Jordan, Marshalene _ Franklin 
Jordan, Susie Kate _ _ Jackson 
Keadle, Ruth _____ Lamar 

Kent, Mary Alice _ _ Stewart 
Kilpatrick, Anna Mary _ Morgan 
King, Olive ______ Sumter 

Lancaster, Mattie Claude Pulaski 
Lane, Mary _____ Chatham 

Lang, Sara Kate South Carolina 
Latimer, Laura _ _ _ _ Wilkes 

Lavender, Eva _ _ _ _ Jackson 

Lawrence, Frances _ _ _ Upson 
Lee, Sara _____ Meriwether 

Leonard, Grace _ _ _ Chatham 
Lewis, Mildred _ _ _ Bulloch 
Linch, Eugenia _____ Butts 

Lord, Lucibel _ _ _ _ Madison 

Lovett, Edna _____ Campbell 

Lowe, Sara _______ Peach 

McDonald, Thelma _ _ _ Barrow 
McElwaney, Jessi° _ _ _ Coweta 
McKenny, Rosalia _ _ _ _ Bibb 

McKinnon, Susie _ _ _ _ Clay 



Name County 

MoLendon, Pauline _ _ _ _ Bicb 

McLeod, Elizabeth _ Mississippi 
McRea, Ellen _____ Clarke 

Macken, Wilhemina _ _. Hancock 
Maddox, Louise _ _ _ Turner 
Malcolm, Curtis _ _ _ _ Waltoi 

Malcolm, Martha Rachel Walton 
Marbut, Marguerite _ _ Clarke 
Massey, Bonnie _ _ _ _ Jackson 

Mathews, Wilma _ _ _ _ Troup 

Merritt, Tommie _ _ _ Webster 
Miller, Edith _ _ _ _ Terrell 

Minor, Pauline _ _ _ Gwinnett 
Moffat, Lucia _ _ _ _ Chatham 

Moncrief, Pearl _ _ _ Haralson 
Montgomery, Virginia _ _ Floyd 
Moorehead, Annie G. _ _ _ Hart 
Morgan, Hilda Ruth _ Effingham 
Nix, Beatrice ______ Bibb 

Norwood, Samuella _ _ Thomas 
Oglesby, Fay ______ Hart 

Orr, Mary Louise _ _ _ Gordon 
Overstreet, Sara _ _ _ _ Ware 

Page, Frances _____ Bibb 

Parham, Rosa _ _ _ _ Greene 

Parker, Fannie Lee _ Franklin 
Parker, Jessie Mae _ _ Barrow 
Patten, Vernelle _____ Tift 

Payne, Margaret _ _ _ _ Taylor 

Peebles, Margaret _ _ _ Wilcox 
Peek, Annysue _ _ _ _ Henry 

Perkins, Ollie _ _ _ Pike 

Pfister, Hilda Thomas 

Phillips, Florrie _ _ _ Clarke 
Phillips, Mary Nelle _ _ Walton 

Phillips, Vivian _ Franklin 

Powell, Vera ______ Rabun 

Quante, Dorothea _ _ Chatham 
Rankin, Louise _____ I). Kail) 

Reed, Mary _______ Polk 

Renfroe, Mary Lou _ _ Treutlen 
Reynolds, Edna _ _ _ Richmond 
Richardson, [mogene Muscogee 



« 



68 



STATE NORMAL SCHOOL 






Name County Name County 

Robinson, Ada _ _ _ _ Decatur Toole, Henrietta Richmond 

Rogers, Dorothy _ _ _ Appling Turner, Cora Lee _ _ _ Terrell 

Rogers, Nellie _ _ _ _ Bartow Turner, Eunice _ _ _ Muscogee 

Sanders, Mabel _ Calhoun Turner, Ruth _ _ _ Meriwether 

Sapp, Martha _ _ _ _ Stewart Veale, Ethel _____ Oconee 

Scott, Janie _______ Bibb Wages, Ruth _____ Clarke 

Sewell, Kathleen _ _ _ Franklin Waits, Hah Jasper 

Shafer, Ola _ _ _ _ Alabama Walker, Clara _ _ _ _ Screven 

Shearouse, Annie _ _ Effingham Wallace, Inez _ _ _ _ DeKalb 

Sherrer, Beatrice _ _ Madison Walters, Josephine _ _ iSumter 

Shufflebarger, Elizabeth Ward, Opal _____ Gordon 

Toombs Wasdin, Pauline _ _ _ _ Burke 

Sibley, Rachel _ _ _ Meriwether Watkins, Lura _ _ _ _ Douglas 

Sims, Annie _____ Clarke Watt, Martha Lee _ _ Muscogee 

Sims, Minnie Lee_ _ _ _ Troup Watt, Rheta _____ Muscogee 

Smith, Alberta _ Jefferson Weaver, Eloise _ _ _ _ Taylor 

Smith, Frances _ _ _ _ Clarke Webb, Lillie Mae _ _ -Walton 

Smith, Jessie _ _ _ _ Jefferson Weitman, Marion _ _ Chatham 

Smith, Mayme _ _ _ _ Madison West, Janie Helen _ Habersham 

Smith, Ruby _____ Clarke Westbrook. Mary Grace 
Sorrells, Mary L. _ _ _ Clarke Franklin 

-Souther, Louise _ _ _ _ Jones White, Dallas Lee _ _ Whitfield 

Spears, Annie _ _ _ _ Newton White, Kathryn Toombs 

Stevens, Delree _ _ _ _ Clarke Whitehead, Louise _ _ Oconee 

Stevens, Florence _ _ _ Sumter Wilder, Annie Gaines _ _ Clarke 

Stewart, Naomi _ _ _ _ Terrell Wilkes, Mamie _ _ _ _ Dooly 

Stokes, Pauline _____ Bibb Williams, Edris _____ Crisp 

Storey, Myrtis _____ Clarke Williams, Myzelle _ _ _ _ iCrisp 

Strickland, Sara Kate _ Haralson Willson, Louise _ _ _ _ Newton 

Thompson, Mary Agnes Wilson, Rosalie _ _ _ _ Banks 

Meriwether Wood, Mary _____ Clarke 

Thompson, Mattie Bell _ Harris Woolridge, Mary Muscogee 

Thorpe, Isabel _ _ _ Mcintosh Word, Dorothy _ _ _ _ Carroll 

Tiller, Mildred _ _ Oglethorpe Wren, Sara _____ Jefferson 

First Year Diploma 
Name County Name County 

Abercrombie, Gussie _ _ Clarke Andrews, Lucy _ _ Richmond 

Abercrombie, Reba _ _ _ Clarke Ashe, Vera ______ Walton 

Adams, Jewell _ _ _ _ Hart Aultmian, Audrey _ _ _ _ Worth 

Alexander, Carrie Mae_Tattnall Baber, Frances _ _ _ _ DeKallb 

Alexander, Evelyn _ _ Jackson Bacon, Ruby _ _ _ Oglethorpe 

Allgood, Annie Mae Pickens Bagwell, Anita _ _ _ _ Barrow 

Anderson, Estelle _ _ 'Richmond Bailey, Sara H. _ _ _ _ Coweta 



STATE NORMAL SCHOOL 



69 



Name County 

Barroiw, Choyce _ _ _ _ Taylor 
Bateman, Mattie Belle 

Washington 

Baugh, Margaret Harris 

Beale, Gertrude _ _ _ Richmond 
Belcher, Frances _ _ _ Sumter 
Bennett, Grace _ _ _ _ Wayne 

Bentley, Ethel Muscogee 

Bentley, Sue Beck _ _ Lincoln 
Berry, Elizabeth _ _ _ _ Lamar 
Bigelow, Julia _ _ _ _ -Terrell 
Black-well, Annie South Carolina 
Booth, Sara »Sue _ _ _ _ Clarke 
Borom, Eva _____ Randolph 
Bowden, Elizabeth _ _ _ Clarke 
Bowden, Josie Frank _ _ Clarke 
Bowden, Margaret _ _ Muscogee 
Bowen, Edna Mae _ _ Bulloch 
Boynton, Margaret _ _ Mitchell 

Brackett, Delia Lee Clarke 

Bradberry, Desma _ _ _ Barrow 
Bradley, Lena _____ Pickens 
Brooks, Jimmie Lou _ Campbell 
Brooks, Louise _ _ _ _ Fulton 
Buck, Elizabeth _ _ _ Muscogee 
Burch, Celistia _ _ _ _ Laurens 

Callaway, Mary Helen Wilkes 

Campbell Mildred _ _ _ _ Bibb 

Carlisle, Frances _ _ _ Jackson 
Carpenter, Myrtle _ _ _ Elbert 
Castleherry, Ruby _ _ _ Stewart 
Castlen, Ida ______ Monroe 

Chandler, Martha _ _ _ Oconee 
Chandler, Molene _ _ Madison 
Clark, Lucy _ _ _ _ Meriwether 

Clegg, Alma ______ Clarke 

Clenny, Ruth _____ Calhoun 

Cochran, Bess _ _ _ _ Mitchell 

Colquitt, Antoinette _ _ Upson 
Cooke, Ethel _____ Catoosa 

Cofer, Marguerite _ _ _ Wilkes 
Cordell, Vera ______ Hart 

Cowan, Louise _ _ _ _ Rockdale 



Name County 

Cowart, Susie Mae _ _ Calhoun 
Crouch, Evelyn _ _ Meriwether 
Cullefer, Mary _ _ _ Randolph 
Darden, Evelyn _ _ _ _ Heard 
Davis, Anna Louise _ _ Fulton 
Davis, Gene _____ Florida 
Deal, Alma _ _ _ _ Habersham 
Dennis, Margaret _ _ _ Green 
Dent, Charlotte _____ Hail 
Denton, Rubye _ _ _ Paulding 
Dodd, Lillian _ _ _ Habersham 
Drewry, Lillian _____ Pike 
Dunahoo, Alice _ _ _ _ Barrpw 

Easterling, Lola Tattnall 

Eaves, Kathleen _ _ _ Haralson 
Eaves, Willie Lou _ _ _ Elbert 
Edwards, Jessie Mae _ Houston 
Einstien, Christine _ _ Mitchell 
Epperson, Jessie _ _ _ Alabama 
Everett, Mary Frances _ Bleckly 
Faning, Julia _ _ _ _ McDuffiie 
Fargarson, Marion _ Crawford 
Fort, Amelia _ _ _ _ Stewart 
Fowler, Rebecca _ _ _ _ Clarke 
Garner, Sudie _ _ _ _ Gwinnett 
Gay, Johnnie _ _ _ _ Toombs 
Gholson, Lucy _ _ _ _ Madison 
George, Lorena Helen _ Fulton 
Gilbert, Gladys _ _ _ _ Laurens 

Ginn, Mary Sue Franklin 

Ginn, Nelle Franklin 

Glass, Marian Henry 

Gleaton, Lucile _____ Crisp 
Goodwin, Theodosia _ _ Macon 

Grant, Mrs. Sue Habersham 

Green, Callie ______ Milton 

Griffin, Lily May _ _ _ Glascock 
Griner, Maggie _ _ _ _ Mitchell 

Guill, Florence _ _ _ _ Hancock 

Hale, Edna ______ Clarke 

Hall, Annie Sue _ _ _ _ Worth 

Hall, Lillie Mae _ _ _ Richmond 
Harper, Annie _ __ _ Oconee 



70 



STATE NORMAL SCHOOL 



v. Name County 

Harper, Clara Phoebe _ Houston 
Harper, Olivia _ _ _ -Taliaferro 

Harrison, Mayrelle Barrow 

Hartley, Annie Mary Wheeler 

Harvey, Ruth Wheeler 

Hicks, Rachel ______ Bibb 

Hinely, Selma Effingham 

Hinton, Lucile _____ Barrow 

Hogg, Elma Webster 

Hogg, Nettyle _ _ _ _ -Marion 

Holland, Lois Paulding 

Holland, Miriam Chattooga 

Hollowell, Edna -Chatham 

Holt, Agnes Peach 

Home, Jewel _____ -Stewart 

Home, Ruby Lee _ _ _ Stewart 
Howell, Myrtice _ _ _ _ Mitchell 

House, Winifred _ _ _ _ Wilkes 

Hudson, Elizabeth _ _ _ Toombs 
Huntei^ Nina _ _ _ Oglethorpe 
Hursey, Maxie _ _ _ _ Tattnall 

Hynra-n, Neva _ _ _ _ Treutlin 

Irby, Orrah Lou _ _ Meriwether 
Jackson, Kathryn _ _ _ _ Bibb 

Jenkins, Mary _____ Bacon 

Johnson, Etta Mildred _ _ Early 
Johnson, Junita _ _ _ _ Clarke 

Johnson, Thelma _ _ _ Greene 
Jones, Cecil _______ Pike 

Jordan, Annie _ _ _ _ Jackson 

Kennon, Sarah _ _ _ _ Muscogee 

Kicklighter, Nellie Ruth, Tattnall 

Kicklighter, Ruby Tattnall 

Kidd, Annie Mae _ _ _ Madison 
Kinneibrew, Corrie _ _ _ Clarke 
Kinney, Agnes _____ Carroll 
Kinney, Clara Belle _ _ Jackson 

Kirbo, Nannie Sue Mitchell 

Kirkland, Maude Lee _ Screven 
Lamar, Mary _ _____ Clarke 

Lane, L. C. _____ _ Miller 

Lawhorn, Zyrtine _ _ _ Stewart 



Name County 

Lester, Mary _____ Clarke 
Levine, Doris _____ Newton 
Lewis, Laura _____ Lincoln 
Littleton, Eloise _ _ _ _ Oconee 
Lovett, Marguerite _ Meriwether 
Lyle, Olivia Evalin _ _ Clarke 
McArthur, Emma _ _ _ _ Early 
Mc'Cay, Roma _____ Madison 
McElhannon, LaWare _ Jackson 
McElmurray, Dorothy Richmond 
McLandon, Maxine _ _ _ _ Clay 
MclMath, Bertha Alice _ Sumter 
McQuaig, Nina Mae _ Wheeler 
MciRae, Virginia _____ Bibb 
Markey, Martha _ _ Dougherty 
Marlowe, Mozelle _ _ _ Jackson 
Melson, Olive _ _ _ _ Clayton 
Merritt, Clara _ _ _ Gwinnett 

Mimbs, Maude Toombs 

Mize, Willie Maude _ _ _ Banks 
Mobley, Ray _ _ _ _ Chattooga 
Mock, Robbie _ _ _ _ Chatham 
Moncrief, Nellie _ _ _ _ Bibb 
Montgomery, Mary _ _ _ _ Hall 
Moore, Martha _ _ _ _ Madison 
Morris, Gladys _ _ Montgomery 

Morris, Winifred Gwinnett 

Morrison, Sara Louise 

Montgomery 
Murray,) Emmie _____ Dooly 

NewiMeyer, Virginia Ann DeKalb 
Newton, Peggy _ _ _ _ Coweta 

Nix, Edith Clarie _ _ Gwinnett 
Nix, Edith Cornelia _ _ Jackson 
Oslborne, Vesta _ _ _ _ DeKalb 

Owen, Irene ______ Henry 

Parker, Lora Pearl _ Wilkinson 
Parker, Louise _ _ _ Calhoun 
Parker, Ora Merle _ Wilkinson 
Pearson, Edith _ _ _ _ Troup 

Pearson, Frances Nell _ _ Harris 
Pearson, Lucile _ _ _ _ Harris 

Peavy, Gertrude _ _ _ _ Peach 



STATE NORMAL SCHOOL 



71 



Name County 

Pentecost, Elizabeth _ Gwinnett 
Perry, Martha C. _ _ _ Mitchell 

Petropol, Ella _ _ _ Clarke 

Petropol, Stella _ _ _ _ Clarke 

Pettit, Clara Nell Picksens 

Pickett, Anne _____ Bibb 

Pittard, Evelyn _ _ _ Gwinnett 
Poindexter, Allene _ _ Calhoun 
Pope, Ava ______ Clarke 

Porterfield, Marie _ _ J _ Clarke 
Powers, Effie Mae _ _ Franklin 
Prothro, Myrtice _ _ _ Henry 
Ragsdale, Willie _ _ _ Paulding 
Ramsey, Martha _ _ _ _ Newton 

Ramsey, Sara Sue _ _ _ Newton 
Rankin, Thelma _ _ _ _ Oconee 

Rauzin, Miriam _ _ _ Chatham 
Reeves, AaraJbelle _ _ _ _ Pike 

Richardson, Ruth _ _ _ Wilcox 
Richter, Mabel _____ Grady 

Riden, Emily Morgan 

Rigdon, Clifford _ Pike 

Roberts, Lucetta _ _ _ Hancock 
Roberts, Metta _ _ _ _ Paulding 
Roberts, Ora Lee _ _ _ Paulding 
Sanders, Martiel _ _ _ Walton 
Sanders, Mildred _ _ _ Randolph 
Sanders, Ruth _ _ _ _ Jackson 
Sands, Louise _ _ _ _ Troup 
Satlof, Anna _ _ _ _ Muscogee 

Scott, Delia Tattnal 

Scruggs. Jessie _ _ _ _ Jefferson 
Sewell, Louise _ _ _ _ Coweta 

Sewell, Martha Meriwether 

Shakelford, Virginia _ Jackson 
Shankle, Clare _ _ _ _ Jackson 
Shanklin, Margaret _ _ Jackson 
Shannon, Effie Belle _ _ Fayette 
Sharp, Mary Emily _ Columbia 
Sh i ley, 'Roselle _ _ _ Franklin 
Shivers, Evelyn _ _ Randolph 

Sims, Mary Ella Jackson 

Smith, Amoretta _ _ Oglethorpe 



Name County 

Smith, Joethetis _ _ _ _ Talbot 
Smith, Virginia _ _ _ _ Carroll 
Smoak, Rubye _ _ _ _ Worth 
Sockwell, Mary _ _ _ Newton 
Sorrells, Margaret _ _ _ Clarke 
Spence, Winnie Sue _ _ Coweta 
Spooner, Ha _ _ _ _ _ Seminole 
Starr, Margaret _ _ _ Coweta 
Starr, Nan Nelle _ _ _ _ Barrow 
Starr, Ruth _____ Coweta 
Stephens, Annie _ _ _ Campbell 

Stephens, Cora _ Campbell 

Stephenson, Emily _ _ Stewart 
Stevens, Lucy _____ Cobb 

Stevens, Ruth _ _ _ _ Mitchell 

Stewart, lone _ _ _ _ Sumter 

Stinson, Mary _____ Talbot 

Stokes, Lucy ______ Bi.Dtb 

Storey, Eva ______ Carroll 

Storey, Helen _ _ _ _ Jackson 

Stubbs, Willa Mae _ _ _ Evans 
Swanson. Minnie Ola _ Fayette 
Swanson, Naomi _ _ _ Fayette 
Sullivan, Lucile _ _ _ _ Dooly 

Teston, Clarice _ _ _ _ Florida 

Thornton. Myrtle _ _ _ Monroe 
Thornton, Mary Pope _ _ El'bert 
Threlkeld, Eva _ _ _ _ Madison 

Tidwell, Ida May _ _ _ Douglas 
Tiller, Ruby _ _ _ _ Oglethorpe 

Tippins, Janie Louise _ _ Evans 
Tolbert, Salena _ _ _ _ Madison 

Turner, Amy _____ Jones 

Turner, Ethel _____ Green 

Van Wagner, Harry _ _ DoKalb 
Voylos.) Lula _____ 'Jackson 

Wade. Elma Iht.sy _ _ _ Brooks 
Waits. Grace ______ Jasper 

Waldrep, Kathleen Clarke 

Wallace. Alda DeKalb 

Walling. Ned _ _ _ _ Tattnall 
Walrayen, Gladys _ - - Cordon 
Watson. Addle Belle _ . DeKaA 



52 



STATE NORMAL SCHOOL 



Name 
•Watts, Elizabeth _ _ 

* Wells, Georgia _ 

Wells, Katherine 

Whitehead, Aretha _ 
Whitehead, Marjorie 
Whittle, Clare _ _ 
Wiggins, Mildred _ _ 
Williams, Ellie Willi* 
Williams, Eula Kate 
Williams, Grace _ 
Williams, Margaret _ 
"Williams, Winnifred 



County 

_ Bartow 

Fulton 

Meriwether 
_ Emanuel 
_ Calhoun 
_ _ Upson 

_ Catoosa 
! Taliaferro 

_ _ Crisp 
_ _ Henry 
_ Gwinnett 
_ _ Worth 



Name 

Wilson, Ruby _ _ . 
Wise, Eva Mae _ _ 
Woeltjen, Marion _ _ 
Wood, Lou Etta _ _ 
Woodham, Martha _ 
Womble, Daisy _ _ 
Wren, Marion _ _ 
Wright, Beulah _ _ 

Wyche, Evelyn 

Wyche, Sarah Louise 



County 

. _ Wilcox 
Meriwether 

-Chatham 
_ Gwinnett 

_ Pulaski 
_ _ Evans 
_ Jefferson 
_ Taliferro 
Meriwether 

Meriwether 



Irregulars 



Bell, Zealure Mae _ _ _ Clarke 
Bloodworth, Louise _ _ Baldwin 
Christopher, Ida Mae _ _ Macon 
Darden, Jack Howard ._ _ Troup 
©unstan, Grace _ _ _ _ Brazil 
Edenfield, Eloise _ _ _ Screven 
Hudson, Mary _ _ _ _ Troup 

Huff, Alberta _ Clarke 

Johnson, Eloise _ _ _ Chatham 



Leathers, Thelma _ 
Matthews, Bess E. 
Preetorius, Esther _ 
Rogers, Grace _ _ _ 
Stevens, Attalissa _ 
Strickland, Ethel _ _ 
Wehunt, Clyde _ _ 
Willcox, Mrs. Clark . 
Wyche, Etta 



_ _ Clarke 

. Muscogee 

_ _ Bulloch 

_ Madison 

_ Stewart 

_ Seminole 

_ _ Clarke 

_ _ Clarke 

Meriwether 



Almond, Musette 
Boothe, Gladys 
Brooks, Mary 
Chambers, Ritsie 
Coker, Evelyn 
Collie, Sara Mildred 
Dottery, Edwin 
Fields, Gordon 
Guest, C. B. 
Herring, John Willie 
Huff, James 



Bishop, Emmett 
Christian, L. H. 
Coker, Lester 
Doster, Olivia 
Eidom, Anita 



TRAINING SCHOOL 
First Grade 

Landrum, Flecia 
La/Count, Sam 
Oliver, Clayton 
Parker, Bettie 
Presnell, Grover 
Sanders, Dorothy 
Sims, David 
Spencer, Guy 
Warwick, Mary 
Wortham, Christine 

Second Grade 

Guest, Rudolph 
Hale, Martha Lena 
Henderson, Ralph 
Kenney, John 
King, Lucile 



STATE NORMAL SCHOOL 



73 



Kirk, Corrinna 
Lindsay, Mel Yin 
McLeroy, Henry 
Merry, Milton 
Mitchell, Constance 
Nash, Blanche 
Nash, Sarah 



Allen, Alb an 
Boo the, Florence 
Boothe, Frances 
Brim, Anne 
Brooks, Howard 
Cagle, Harold 
Callaway, Lucy 
Cooksey, Wilbur 
Couch, Earnest 
Hays, Walter 
Herring, Albert 



Aaron, Charles 
Almand, Leon 
Butler, Martha 
Cagle, Mildred 
Christian, Felton 
Couch, Calvin 
Hale, Thomas 
Herring, James 

Anderson, Catherine 
Bishop, Julius 
Booth, Russell 
Cooksey, Lorene 
Doster, Virginia 
Edwards, Charles 
Hunter, Mary 

Almond, Mattie Sue 
Anderson, W. H. 
Brooks, Calvin 
Christian, Ora Lee 
Guest, Cecil 



Papa, Tresa 
Sims, Louise 
Spratling, Willie 
Spratling, Lillie 
Stephens, Lois 
Upchurch, Herman 
Whitehead, Hazel 

Tliird Grade 

Hill, Alva Joe 
Hill, Reba 
Huff, Thomas 
Lawrence, Allen T. 
Meade, Alice 
Sanders, Marie 
Seagraves, Robert 
Spencer, Curtis 
Stephens, W. L. 
Waters, Sadie Mae 
Yearwood, Nell 

Fourth Grade 

Meade, Roy 
Poss, Wilsie 
Prigeon, Lucy 
Sell, Edward 
Sorroughs, Billy 
Thompson, Willie Sue 
Warwick, Ila Mae 
Wortham, Rufus 

Fifth Grade 

Papa, Mary 
Shetterly, Fay 
Storey, Betty 
Thaxton, Karl 
Vaughan, Aubrey 
Whitehead, Winston 

Sixth Grade 

Hale, Lois 
Hale, Zettie Mae 
Herring, Louise 
Kenny, Helen 
Merry, Miriam 



74 



STATE NORMAL SCHOOL 



Nickelson, Bertie 
Poss, Hazel 
Sanders, Mardelle 



Saye, Evelyn 
Sorrells, Cleveland 
Thompson, Sara 



Seventh Grade 



Ayeock, Lucile 
Burns, Elmer 
Crow, Edna Mae 
Doster, Louis 
Hale, Talmadge 
Lindsay, Mary Frances 
Mitchell, Grace 
Pridgeon, Mary 



Bevers, Estelle 
Chappell, Nell 
Hale, Theron 
Nixon, Pearl 
Papa, Mildred 
Shackleford, Hazel 



Aaron, Clarence 
Bennett, Leonora 
Bond, Ruth Nell 
Conoway, Leo 
Craft, Sarah 
Huff, Moselle 
Johnson, Annie Lene 
Joiner, Mollie 



Bart, Bertha 
Bowling, Elvin 
Cagle, Lois 
Calhoun, Mabel 



Crooke, Ethel 
Fisher, Lorraine 
Fowler, Mrs. T. M. 
Grant, Evelyn 
Kingery, Lucile 
Lifsitz, Deborah 



Scoggins, James 
Sorrough, Roselyn 
Spratlin, Viola 
Tench, Thelma 
Thompson, Sara 
Veal, Odessa 
Whitehead, Eugenia 



Eighth Grade 



Shackleford, Helen 
Spencer, Annie 
Wages, David 
Wallace, Ella 
Yearwood, Mary 



Ninth Grade 



Maddox, Verna Mae 
Massey, Ethelyn 
Massey, Leonard 
Nicholson, Louise 
Shackleford, Montine 
Shetterly, Ru'by 
Worley, Emma Lee 



Tenth Grade 



Moss, Catherine 
Sullivan, Agnes 
Watson, Elizabeth 



Eleventh Grade 



Mansfield, Leola 
Morgan, Mary 
Sherrer, Sallie Mae 
Yarbrough, Maude 
Zuber, Vivian 



STATE NORMAL SCHOOL 



75 



Brown, Gladys 
Cleveland, Coyel 
Flanagan, Ernest 
Hale, Marvin 
Johnson, Erastus 



Brown, Bonnie 
Burns, Elizabeth 
Dellinger, Marshall 



Brown, Pauline 
Burns, Edna 
Colvard, Hershael 
Fowler, Pinkie 
Lester, Margaret 
Lester, Rufus 

Cleveland, Grover 
Dellinger, Garnett 
Dunn, Edward 
Flanagan, Marvin 
Fowler, Louise 
Lester, Arthur 
Lester, John Willie 
Lester, Leon 

Burns, Telford 
Dellinger, Bethie 
Johnson, Guy Lewis 
Johnson, Jessie 

Driskell, Doyce 
Flanagan, Mary 
Lester, Sallie Lou 

Driskell, Velma 
Fowler, Alice Nelle 
Lester, Ellie 
Lester, Teddy 
Lord, Mildred 

Summary by grades 



RURAL SCHOOL 

Johnson, James 
Johnson, Robert 
Lester, Ralph 
Noell, Ada Maude 
Rumsey, Mildred 

Second Grade 

Flanagan, Horace 
McChire, Mary Francis 
Threlkeld, Minnie Lou 

Third Grade 

Nelms, B. G. 

Rice, Hope 

Rumsey, Willie 

Tate, Raymond 

Tate, Willie T. 

Wallace, Ralph 
Fourth Grade 

Maynard, Carlton 

Noell, Virginia 

Nunnally, Wedford 

Oldham, Doris 

Oldham, Francis 

Rumsey, Una 

Threlkeld, Clayton 

Threlkeld, J. B. 
Fifth Grade 

Lester, Oscar 

MoClure, Janette 

Threlkeld, Frank 

Winn, Louise 
Sixth Grade 

Oldham, Grace 

Rumsey, Ina 

Wallace, Opal 

Seventh Grade 

Maynard, Nellie 
Oldham, Ruth 
Payne, Donald 
Rumsey, Ruby 

First, 10; Second, 6; Third, 12; Fourth. 



16; Fifth, 8; Sixth, 6; Seventh, 9. Total, 67 



BULLETIN 



OF 



The State Normal College 



ATHENS, GEORGIA 



Thirty-Fifth Annual Session, 19274928 
FEBRUARY, 1927 



Issued Quarterly by the State Normal College 



Entered at the Test Office at Athens. Ga.. as Second Class Matter, November 
8th, 1913. Under Act of Congress of .luly. 1893. 



Vol. 14 Serial No. 25 No. 1 



CALENDAR 1927-28 



1927 

September 6th, Tuesday — School Dormitories Open. 
September 6th, Tuesday — Classification of Students. 
September 7th, Wednesday — Classification of Students. 
September 8th, Thursday — Fall Term Begins. 
December 1st, Thursday — Second Quarter Begins. 
December 22nd, Thursday — Christmas Holidays Begin. 
(Recitations end Wednesday, December 21st). 

1928 

January 6th, Thursday — Re-opening of School. 

March 8th, Thursday — Third Quarter Begins. 

April 17th, Tuesday — Founders Day. 

May 27th, Sunday — Commencement Sermon, at 11:00 A. M. 

May 28th, Monday — Annual Concert, at 8:00 P. M. 

May 29th, Tuesday — Annual meeting of Board of Trustees, 10:00 

A. M. 
May 30th, Wednesday — Graduation Exercises at Noon. 



BOARD OF TRUSTEES AND OFFICERS 



B. S. MILLER, Columbus, Ga President 

Members ex-officio 

Governor Clifford M. Walker Atlanta, Ga. 

State Superintendent of Schools, Fort E. Land Atlanta, Ga. 

Chancellor, University of Georgia, Charles M. Snelling — Athens, Ga. 

Members-at-Large 

Mrs. W. W. Stark Commerce, Ga. 

Mrs. J. E. Hayes Montezuma, Ga. 

Members City of Athens 

H. Abit Nix Athens, Ga. 

Mrs. Julia Ashton White Athens, Ga. 

Members Representing Trustees of University of Georgia 

Judge Loyd Cleveland Griffin, Ga. 

H. J. Rowe Athens, Ga. 

Howell Erwin Athens, Ga. 

Members Representing Congressional Districts 

First District, Joseph W. Smith Reidsville, Ga. 

Second District, W. V. Custer Bainbridge, Ga. 

Third District, J. M. Collum Americus, Ga. 

Fourth District, B. S. Miller Columbus, Ga. 

Fifth District, Mrs. Howard McCall Atlanta, Ga. 

Sixth District, Frank F. Jones Macon, Ga. 

Seventh District, Mrs. Annie Freeman Johnson Rome, Ga. 

Eighth District, S. B. Yow Lavonia, Ga. 

Ninth District, L. M. Brand Lawrenceville, Ga. 

Tenth District, Mrs. Ira E. Farmer Thomson, Ga. 

Eleventh District, Jerome Crawley Waycross, Ga. 

Twelfth District, Judge W. W. Larsen Dublin, Ga. 

Secretary and Treasurer 

G. A. Mell Athens, Ga. 



COMMITTEES 



Salaries — Rowe, Snelling, Collum, Brand, Custer, McCall, Johnson, 
Hayes. 

Prudential — Land, Snelling, Rowe, Nix, White. 

Legislative — Cleveland, Custer, Stark, Hayes, McCall, Crawley. 

Uniform — Brand, Yow, McCall, Stark, Farmer. 

Teachers and Course of Study — Land, Yow, Crawley, Smith, Jones, 
Collum, White, Stark, Hayes. 

Finance — Brand, Nix, Cleveland, Custer, Farmer, Johnson. 

Laws and Regulation — Cleveland, Rowe, Larsen, Jones, Farmer, 
Smith. 

Buildings and Grounds — Snelling, Yow, Smith, Rowe, Collum, 
White, Larsen, Stark. 



STATE NORMAL COLLEGE 

OFFICERS AND FACULTY 



CHAS. M. SNELLING Chancellor Ex-Officio 

Chancellor of the University of Georgia. 

JERE M. POUD, A. B., LL. D President 

MISS EMMIE JONES Bookkeeper 

A. RHODES Business Manager 

H. B. RITCHIE Dean 

MRS. H. C DOOLITTLE Registrar 

MISS PRANCES ROWE Record Clerk 

G. A. MELL Secretary and Treasurer 



MRS. GERTRUDE A. ALEXANDER, A. M. 

Expression; Assistant in English. 

MISS FRANCES RANDOLPH ARCHER, 

Librarian. 

MRS. J. W. BAILEY, 

Assistant in Piano Department. 

MISS BESS M. BAIRD, A. M., 

Household Arts. 

W. S. BECKWITH, A.M., 

Mathematics. 

MRS. MARGARET HARRIS BLAIR, 

Assistant in Household Art Department. 

MRS. W. E. BROACH, B. S. H. E., 

Assistant, Household Arts. 

PETER F. BROWN, A. M., 

English. 

MISS MANITA BULLOCH, 

Assistant, Oratory. 

MISS IRIS CALLAWAY, B. S., M. A., 

Assistant in Department of Mathematics. 

MRS. LENA CHANDLER, 

Housekeeper. 

MISS NELLIE COLBERT, 

Matron Gilmer Hall. 

MRS. A. J. CONYERS, 

Trained Nurse. 



STATE NORMAL COLLEGE 

W. L. COOKSEY, 

Farm Superintendent. 

MISS KATE DOWNS, 

Critic Teacher. 

MISS DAISY DRAKE, A. B., 

Critic Teacher. 

MISS LOUISE DRAKE, B. S., 
Health. 

DAVID L. EARNEST, A. M., 

Science. 

MRS. AGNES EBERHARDT, 

Piano. 

MISS LAURA ELDER, 

Teacher of Rural School. 

MRS. W. H. ELLIOTT, 

Critic Teacher. 

MISS DOROTHY FARGARSON, A. B. 

Critic Teacher. 

MISS LOUISE GLASS, B. S., 

Assistant in Science Department. 

MISS EDITH GUILL, 

Assistant in Department of Physical Education. 

MISS LILLIE HENNING, 

Critic Teacher. 

MISS IRMA HICKS, 

Assistant in Department of Household Arts. 

MISS KATE HICKS, 

Principal Elementary School. 

MISS ANNIE MAE HOLLIDAY, 

Manual Arts. 

MRS. MAGGIE LAMBDIN. 

Matron, Bradwell Hall. 

MISS ADA LAW, B. S., 

Assistant, English Department. 

MISS ANNIE LINTON, 

Assistant in Department of Manual Arta. 

JOSEPH LUSTRAT, LL. D., 

Officer D'Academie, Officer de l'lnstruction Publique, 

Romance Langues. 

MISS ANNIE V. MASSEY, A. B., 

Principal, State Normal Academy. 



8 STATE NORMAL COLLEGE 

MISS MOINA MICHAEL, 

Y. W. C. A. Secretary; Matron, Winnie Davis Hall. 

MRS. PEARL MOON, B.S., 

Assistant, Household Arts. 

MISS RHODA PERMENTER, M. A., 

History. 

H. B. RITCHIE, A. M., 

Education. 

MISS ETHEL M. SCOTT, B. Ped., 

Critic Teacher. 

E. S. SELL, M. S. Agr., 

Agriculture and Rural Social Science. 

MISS FLORENCE SIMPSON, A. B., 

Mathematics and Latin, State Normal Academy. 

MISS JENNIE BELL SMITH, 

Public School Music. 

J. H. SIMS, 

Engineer. 

MISS HELEN SPROUT, 

Latin and Greek. 

MISS MARY STRAHAN, A. B., 

Assistant Romance Languages. 

MISS LURA B. STRONG, 

Physical Education. 

D. W. SYLVESTER, 

Assistant in Department of Manual Arts. 

MISS CAROLYN VANCE, B. L. I., 

Oratory. 

MISS ALICE WALKER, A.B., 

Assistant in English Department. 

MISS SARA WEBB, Ph. B., 

Assistant in Department of Education. 

MISS MABEL MANNING WEDGE, B. M., 

Voice. 

MISS THELMA WILSON, 

Critic Teacher. 

MISS ESTHER WOLLA, 

Assistant in Household Arts Department. 

MISS MARY M. WOODS, L. B., 

Assistant in Department of Agriculture and Rural Social Science. 

MISS FLORENCE YOUNG, A. M., 

Assistant in Department of Education. 

MISS MAY ZEIGLER, A. M., 
Assistant in Department of Education. 



STATE NORMAL COLLEGE 



FACULTY COMMITTEES, 1926-27 



Library: Archer, Hicks, Sprout, Brown, Permenter, Zeigler. 

Calendar and Entertainments: Linton, Eberhardt, Rhodes, Callaway, 
Vance. 

Schedule: Baird, Callaway, Ritchie, Sell Holliday. 

Promotion and Publicity: Sell, Earnest, Holliday. 

Curriculum: Brown, Ritchie, Alexander, Sell, Holliday, Baird, 
Sprout, Dumas, Strong. 

Publication: Sell, Brown, HoHiday. 

School Organizations: Ritchie, Strong, Sell, Earnest, Michael, Col- 
bert. 

Classification: Beckwith, Brown, Ritchie, Sell Alexander, Callaway, 
Webb. 

Alumni-ae: Hicks, Callaway, Wilson, Guill, Webb, Walker, Downs. 
Vance. 

Welfare: Rhodes, Conyers, Strong, Baird, Drake, and Matrons. 

Grounds and Buildings: Rhodes, Sell, Hicks, Lambdin, Colbert. 

Employment: Earnest, Hicks, Ritchie, Baird. 

Records: Beckwith, Webb, Linton, Holliday, Sprout, Guill, Wolla, 
Irma Hicks, Law. 

Uniform: Baird, Broach, Blair, Archer, Strong. 

Absence: Earnest, Webb, Beckwith. 



10 STATE NORMAL COLLEGE 

HISTORICAL 



The Trustees of the University of Georgia donated to the State 
the building known as Rock College and from six to ten acres of 
land contiguous thereto, together with the late George R. Gilmer 
fund. Under the condition of Governor Gilmer's will, this sum 
must be used to train teachers in the elementary branches of an 
English education only. The condition attached to these gifts of 
the Trustees of the University was that the State should establish 
at Rock College a Normal School for the education and training of 
teachers for the rural schools. 

An Act was passed by the Legislature of Georgia in 1891: 

"To establish, organize and maintain a State Normal School as a 
branch to the University, to appropriate money for the same, and 
for other purposes." This Act received!, the approval of the Gov- 
ernor, October 21, 1891. By the provision of this Act, the State 
received from the Trustees of the University, as a donation for the 
purpose of establishing a Normal School, the building known as 
Rock College and a tract of land of not less than six nor more than 
ten acres upon which the college building stood, lying just outside 
the ilimits of the City of Athens, Ga. The Act also provided for a 
Normal School Commission, consisting of the State School Com- 
missioner, who should be the Chairman, the Chancellor of the Uni- 
versity, and "three citizens of Georgia, experienced in teaching, to 
be appointed by the Governor." 

It is interesting to note that the water used by the School came 
from a well, and the water was declared to be pure and wholesome 
and was so cold that no ice was needed. 

The lower floor of Rock College was divided into lecture rooms, 
restaurant, hall and assembly rooms. The second and third floors 
were used as a dormitory. These rooms were furnished by the ap- 
propriation of $500.00 from the City Council of Athens in 1892, 
with wire cots, tables, chairs, buckets and other necessary articles 
of furniture. 

The Act creating the State Normal School was passed in 1891, 
and short sessions of the school were held during the summer 
months of 1892, 1893 and 1894. The Commission had at its com- 
mand only the interest of the Gilmer fund which was transferred 
for safe keeping to the Trustees of the University by the Trustees 
of the estate of the late George R. Gilmer. The interest* on this 
fund amounted to $1,050.00 a year, from which a commission of 
$50.00 a year was deducated for the expense of administration. In 
1892 there were added to this, the Peabody Institute fund of 



STATE NORMAL COLLEGE 11 

$800.00, and the County Institute fund of five counties, which met 
at Rock College for one week, and amounted to $125.00. There- 
fore, the S'chool was carried on in 1893 with the sum of $1,923.00. 

The session of 1892 began July ilth, and lasted seven weeks. 
Exclusive of the attendance during the County Institute week, the 
roll of students numbered 112, representing thirty-two counties. 

So far as the resources of the college for the year 1893 are con- 
cerned, they are best explained by an extract from the minutes of 
the Commission at their meeting in Atlanta, April 1, 1893: 

"The Chairman made a statement of the efforts that had been 
made to induce the Legislature to appropriate a sum of money for 
the permanent establishment of a State Normal School, and stated 
that the Legislature had failed to make an appropriation for the 
purpose named. Dr. William E. Boggs then stated that the net in- 
terest on the Gilmer fund, amounting to $1,000.00, would be avail- 
able on the first day of July. He said, also that the people of Athens 
were desirous of having the Normal School operated during the 
coming summer, 1893, and that the grand jury of Clarke county 
had, at his request, made an appropriation of S400 for the purpose. 
The citizens of Athens had also made up a private subscription of 
$53 7 to be added to the fund. These resources, added together, 
made a total of $1,937 for the summer session of 1893." 

The private subscriptions from the citizens of Athens were se- 
cured by Dr. Edwin D. Newton and Mr. T. W. Reed. This must 
have been a tedious undertaking, for many of the subscriptions 
only amounted to fifty cents. 

The session of 1893 began July 5th, and lasted six weeks. There 
were enrolled 116 students from thirty-five counties. These pupils 
were not all present at the same time. Some came for a week, 
others for two weeks, others for a month, while many remained 
during the entire session. 

The nature of the work done during the sessions of 1S92 and 
1893, the enthusiasm of the students, the apparent demand of an 
enlarged and well-equipped Normal School, induced tlio Normal 
School Commission to appeal to the Legislature of 189:". for an ap- 
propriation to remodel, equip, and operate the State Normal School. 
The Legislature, however, took no action in the matter and the 
Normal S'chool Commission was again left with 'limited moans to 
carry out the provisions of the Act creating the School. 

A meeting of the State Normal School Commission was held in 
Atlanta to take into consideration the work of the School for the 
summer of 1894. 

The Chairman of the Commission stated that the Legislature had 



12 STATE NORMAL COLLEGE 

made no appropriation for the support of the School during the 
year of 1894, and that the only money available was the interest on 
the George R. Gilmer fund. 

After some discussion, the Commission decided to open the col- 
lege for a month during the summer of 1894, and the following 
resolution was passed: 

"Resolved, That the State Normal School at Rock College be 
opened for one month during the summer of 1894, beginning from 
the 17th day of July, and that the interest on the Gilmer fund, 
accruing July 1st, be used for defraying the expenses of the ses- 
sion." 

Another resolution was also passed and was as follows: 

"Resolved, That the Normal School Commission, recognizing the 
generos'ity of the grand jury of Clarke county, the City Council and 
citizens of Athens in the aid they have hitherto given the Normal 
School, and fully grateful for their past favors, yet in view of the 
urgent necessities, of the School, respectfully suggest to the grand 
jury that an appropriation for the year 1894 would greatly aid in 
continuing the prosperity and insuring the success of the Normal 
School." 

"Resolved, That Dr. William E. Boggs, Professor David Barrow, 
Jr., be requested to present this resolution to the next session of 
the grand jury." 

The grand jury received the resolutions, and in their presntmnts 
made an appropriation of $750.00 to the State Normal School, pro- 
vided a session of eight weeks was held. This provision was 
cheerfully agreed to by the Commission, and the day of opening 
of the Normal School for 1894 was changed from July 17'th, to 
July 5th. 

The State Normal School enrolled 175 students during the sum- 
mer of 1894. Fifty-one counties were represented in this student 
body. 

The success of the summer session under the direction of Mr. 
Lawton B. Evans made a permanent Normal School a necessity and 
the Legislature of 1894 gave financial assistance to the School and 
fixed the annual appropriation at ten thousand dollars. 

It was peculiarly fitting that Captain S. D. Bradwell was chosen 
as the first president of the State Normal School, after it was per- 
manently established. Probably no man had done more for the 
teachers of the State, and no one understood their needs better, or 
sympathized with them in their work more. He was possessed with 
a remarkable memory for names and faces, and while State School 
Commissioner, he probably knew more men in Georgia than any 



STATE NORMAL COLLEGE 13 

other man. This fact was an invaluable aid to Captain Bradwell in 
getting the School established. 

The school was opened April 17, 1895. The 17th of April was 
observed as Founder's Day for many years in the school and ap- 
propriate exercises were conducted. Miss Mamie Mathews, of Ogle- 
thorpe county, was the first student to register in the school. The 
attendance during the spring was very smal/1, but the summer 
months brought a much large enrollment. 

Captain S. D. Bradwell tendered his resignation as President of 
the School at a meeting of the Commission held March 7, 1901. 
Mr. E. C. Branson was elected to succeed Captain Bradwell. Cap- 
tain Bradwell had been President since the permanent organization 
of this institution in 1895, during the short period of six years, 
under his administration the School was organized and had grown 
to such an extent that the annual enrollment was well above six 
hundred. 

In 1912 President E. C. Branson resigned to accept the head of 
the department of Rural Economics and Sociology, and Mr. Jere M. 
Pound was elected President. 

1. Gilmer Hall. 

This building was erected in 1860 by the University of Georgia 
and was donated to the State Normal School in 1891. At first the 
Normal School was completely housed in this one building but it is 
now used exclusively as a dormitory. It was named for Governor 
Gilmer, as the income from a fund left by his will was used to help 
found the State Normal School. 

2. Bradwell Hall. 

In 1896 this building was completed as a two-story structure and 
the third floor was added in the following year, and was made pos- 
sible through subscriptions by the teachers in the school. At first, 
part of the lower floor was used as a dining hall and the other part 
of the building was used as a dormitory for young men. It is used 
entirely now as a girl's dormitory. It was named for the first presi- 
dent of the school. 

3. Old Auditorium. 

In 1898 from appropriations of that year, the commission au- 
thorized the erection of this building. It is two stories high, with 
an auditorium on the first floor and class-rooms above. 

4. Winnie Davis Memorial Hall. 

The Daughters of the Confederacy planned this building to per- 
petuate the memory of Winnie Davis, daughter of Jefferson Davis, 



14 STATE NORMAL COLLEGE 

and it was through their efforts that this hall was built. It was 
completed in 1902 and is used as a dormitory. Variousr Chapters 
of the Daughters of the Confederacy maintain rooms in the build- 
ing and make- appointments of the students to occupy the rooms. 
Rooms are secured in the building by applying to Chapters who 
have furnished the different rooms. 

5. Muscogee Elementary Training School. 

George Foster Peabody gave the money to build and equip this 
building and it was completed in 19 02. A well organized school of 
seven grades is carried on in this building to give the Senior class 
practice in teaching before they are allowed to graduate. The 
building was so named because Muscogee is Mr. Peabody's native 
county. 

6. Smith Building. 

This building was completed in 1906. It was made possible 
through gifts by James M. Smith, George Foster Peabody, the State, 
Faculty, and a number of small contributors. It contains class- 
rooms and the administrative offices, and was named for the late 
James M. Smith. 

7. Dining Hall. 

The dining hall was also completed in 1906. The first floor of 
this building is used as adining hall while the second floor is 
known as Senior Hall and is used as a dormitory. 

8. Carnegie Iiibrary. 

This building was given by Andrew Carnegie to the State Normal 
School and is of course used as a library. It contains about ten 
thousand volumes, and was erected in 1910. 

9. The Rural School. 

This is a modern one-room rural school building on the campus 
to give the Seniors practice in teaching in a country school. The 
building is well lighted and heated and complete in every detail. 
The children come from the country thus making it a rural school 
from every point of view. It was built in 1911. 

10. Dairy Barn. 

The structure is of concrete, modern and sanitary in every way, 
with a large silo made at one end. It was built in 1914 and is 
large enough to accommodate seventy cows. The school farm is 
located on the Oconee river three miles from town. This farm 
was purchased, equipped, and is operated without a cent from the 
State. 



STATE NORMAL COLLEGE 15 

11. Infirmary. 

The infirmary was built in 1916 as a result of the efforts of the 
Elijah Clarke Chapter of the Daughters of the American Revolu- 
tion, although the funds were furnished by this Chapter in co- 
operation with the General Assembly. 

12. Practice Home. 

This building was used as an infirmary until the new one was 
built in 1916. It was converted into the practice home where the 
students get practice i n home making, thus putting into practice 
things studied in the class-room. 

13. Miller Hall. 

With an appropriation from the State this dormitory was com- 
pleted in 1917. This is a two-story structure and is modern in 
every respect. It is named in honor of Mr. B. S. Miller, President 
of the Board of Trustees. 

14. Pound Auditorium. 

This building was also finished in 1917, as an appropriation 
amounting to $100,000 from the State was sufficient to build Mil- 
ler Hall and the Pound Auditorium. It has an auditorium that 
Will seat 2,500 people; as well as a number of class-rooms and 
offices. This auditorium is named for the President of the School. 



GENERAL CONDITIONS OF ADMISSION 



The purpose of this school is to "educate and train teachers for 
the common schools of Georgia." The terms of admission are as 
follows: 

First: The applicant must be sufficiently mature and sufficiently 
well prepared to undertake the work of the school successfully. AH 
students, when admitted are considered upon probation at all times: 
and, when unwilling or unable to do the work required, thev wiil 
be privately counseled to Withdraw. 

Second: This institution is a vacational school, not a reforma- 
tory. We have no punishments. All trifling with rules and regu- 
lations or careless, indifferent, and improper conduct will subject 
the offender to the necessity of withdrawing. Only students with 
a serious purpose are desired; and only such will be permitted to 
remain. Students in training are supposed to be mature enoug'i 
to be responsible and our dealings are with them, not with their 
parents. 



16 STATE NORMAL COLLEGE 

Third: Good Moral Character. Every student will be required to 
hand to the President a letter of recommendation from some re- 
sponsible party in the home neighborhood. 

Fourth: Good Health. This school is delightfully situated in the 
Piedmont Hills. The conditions of health here cannot be surpassed. 
But in order to protect our students as carefully as possible we 
have always on duty nurses of the very highest training, whose 
business will be to constantly inspect the dormitories and to ex- 
amine all the students personally for all evidences of sickness and 
ill health. Moreover, all students are subjected to a rigid physical 
examination on arrival; and all defects noted are watched and the 
student is advised how they must best be removed. 

Fifth: Applicants for admission to the school must bring a letter 
from the home physician certifying that the applicant is in sound 
health and has not been exposed to any contagious disease within 
the previous thirty days. See blank for this purpose, next to last 
page. This letter must be presented upon arrival. 

Sixth: Successful vaccination is also another absolutely neces- 
sary condition of entrance. All students upon arrival will have 
their arms examined by a physician; and if they do not have a sat- 
isfactory scar, they must be vaccinated at once 1 before they can be 
admitted to the school. In all cases it is better for applicants to be 
vaccinated before coming here, provided it can be done with fresh, 
pure vaccine points. 

These last two conditions are so imperative, and will be adhered 
to so rigidly, that the applicant who neglects them will be neces- 
sarily subjected to great trouble in entering the school. Plainly 
and emphatically, these things must not be neglected by any ap- 
plicant. 

Registering. 

Upon reaching the school, the student should go at once to the 
office of the Registrar and fill out a registration blank properly. 
This blank is then taken to the Dormitory Manager's office where a 
Dormitory Room Ticket will be obtained. All moneys and fees 
should at once be paid at his office and receipts secured for same. 

The Classification Committee will meet the students in various 
class-rooms for all assignments. A dirctory of where these com- 
mittees may be found will be posted in conspicuous places in the 
corridors of the academic buildings. In order to be properly classi- 
fied at once, the student should bring letter of introduction, health 
certificate, and all reports from former schools and teachers. 



STATE NORMAL COLLEGE 17 

Boarding Departments. 

All dormitories are steam-heated, with toilet rooms and bath on 
every floor abundantly supplied with hot and cold water. They are 
comfortable, pleasant, and healthful homes for the students. All 
of our dormitories are the equal of the best dormitories in all mat- 
ters of convenience and comfort. Students in each dormitory are 
under the care of a resident matron, who looks after their needs and 
comforts. The dining hall is well equipped. 

Board in the dormitories includes room, table fare, heat, lights, 
and attendants for the rougher work. 

Each student will pay for, and look after her own laundering, 
with the assistance of the matron in charge. 

Each student must bring a pillow, pillow-cases, bed-clothes, (in- 
cluding at least one white spread), towels, hair-brush and comb, 
and other personal toilet articles; also a bath-robe, bed-room slip- 
pers, overshoes, wrap and umbrella. 

Each student should bring also one cup and saucer, one dinner 
p<late, one knife, fork and teaspoon, for personal use in the dormi- 
tories, when such things are necessary. It is against the rules 
for any student to carry out or borrow dishes and/ silver from the 
dining-room. 

Male students do not room in the dormitories. Rooms are rented 
for them near the campus and paid for by the school. Such stu- 
dents pay the same rate for board as outlined in the catalogue, 
furnishing bedding, etc., just as the girls do. 

Parents and friends visiting students cannot be accommodated 
dn the dormitories, as there is no room for them. They can secure 
board in the city. 
Assignment of Rooms. 

Rooms are not assigned until the opening of school in the fall. 
This work cannot be done during the summer, except the rooms in 
the Winnie Davis Memorial Hall and these are secured through 
various Chapters of the Daughters of the Confederacy. Students 
that arrive on the first day of the opening of school have a better 
chance of securing room s where they want them. 
Expenses. 

Terms for Board (payable in advance, as indicated). 

September 7th, 1927 — First Payment % 37.50 

November 9th, 1927 — Second Payment 37.50 

January 26th, 1928 — Third Payment 37.50 

March 29th, 1928 — Fourth Payment 37.50 

$150.00 
Matriculation Fee — To be paid on entrance $ 15.00 



18 STATE NORMAL COLLEGE 

Board for students who do not make the quarterly payments as 
indicated above, will be at the rate of $4.50 per week, $1.00 per 
day. 

AH students entering before September 15th ( will be charged 
from date of opening (September 7th). Those entering on, and 
after September 15th, will be charged from the date they enter 
school. 

No tuition is paid by Georgia students. Students from outside 
the State are required to pay $40.00 per year; $20.00 upon entrance, 
and $20.00 at the beginning of the second semester. 

If advisable at any time to raise or lower the rates for board or 
matriculation fee, the rights to do so is reserved. 

Money deposited on dormitory account will not be refunded. 

Money deposited on personal account may be withdrawn at any 
time. No part of the Matriculation fee will be refunded for any 
reason. 

Checks for board or tuition should not be made payable to the 
President, but to the student. 

Students must supply their own text-books. Books will be fur- 
nished at publishers' prices with cost of handling added. A second- 
hand bookstore is also operated for the benefit of the students, 
who wish to buy or sell second-hand books. 

The school has a farm of 215 acres, which is well equipped to 
furnish supplies for the dining-room. 

Uniforms. 

To promote economy, simplicity, and good taste in dress, every 
young woman in the school, unless especially excused iby the Presi- 
dent, is required to purchase and wear the uniform adopted by the 
school. Requests to be excused from wearing the uniform will not 
be considered except for very exceptional and unusual reasons. 

The uniform consists of the following articles: 

For church and street wear — a blue serge suit and cap, white 
waist, tan gloves, black shoes and hose. 

For class room wear — a blue serge suit skirt, uniform waist of 
white poplin, blue Windsor tie. 

For summer and evening wear — a white poplin wash skirt and 
white waist. 

The suit, cap, gloves, white skirts and tie may be ordered by mail 
before the student leaves home. Unless placed in advance, the order 
must be given immediately upon arrival at the school. The white 
waists for school, church, and evening wear must be made of the 
material and according to the patterns designated in the accom- 
panying leaflet giving detailed descriptions. 



STATE NORMAL COLLEGE 19 

The above requirements will be rigidly enforced. There must 
be no attempt at evasion or partial violation of these regulations. 
No other articles, however similar, can be substituted for these 
specified. 

Students are expected to wear the uniform at all times both on 
and off the campus. They need not bring to the school dresses of 
other kinds, for it is desired that the uniform be worn on all oc- 
casions. This uniform is pronounced by all experts who have ex- 
amined it as the cheapest, neatest, completest and best uniform 
prescribed by any institution in the S'outh. 

Uniforms must be kept in good condition. The enforcement of all 
regulations with regard to the unform is within the authority of 
the matrons of the several dormitories. Students may be required 
to buy new garments whenever in the judgment of the President 
and the matrons it is deemed necessary. 

Students must not seLl or give cast off uniform garments to per- 
sons living in the vicinity of Athens. 

The uniform skirt, cap, and white waist should be worn for for- 
mer students when returning to the school in September. All stu- 
dents must wear the uniform as a traveling dress at all other 
times. 

It is very desirable that uniforms be ordered before leaving 
home and worn when coming to Athens. A detailed description 
and order blank will be furnished upon request made to the Reg- 
istrar. 



COURSES OF STUDY 



Requirements of Admission 

1. Only graduates of the four year accredited high schools of 
Georgia and other states are admitted without examinations. Such 
students must offer not fewer than fifteen units. Applicants who 
are not graduates of accredied high schools must stand examina- 
tions in English, Mathematics, History, and either Science or Latin. 

2. Of the fifteen units required for admission, the following are 

prescribed: 

English 3 units 

Mathematics 2% unDts 

History 2 units 

Latin or Science 2 units 

Total 9% units 

3. The remaining 5 Ms units may be offered in any subject ac- 



20 STATE NORMAL COLLEGE 

cepted for graduation by an accredited high school, but not more 
than two of these may be offered in vocational subjects. 

4. Applicants for admission from other colleges must send in a 
copy of their college records when they file their applications for 
admission. Credit will be given for all college courses that are the 
equivalents of those required for graduation from the State Normal 
College. 

DEGREE COURSES 



A. B. EDUCATION 

General Requirements 

1. No student may receive a degree who has not done in resi- 
dence the work of the Senior year. 

2. Candidates for the A. B. degree must complete the number of 

college hours indicated below: 

Education 18 

English . 12 

Latin, Greek, or a Modern Langue 6 

Mathematics 3 

History 3 

Physical Sciences 3 

Social Sciences 3 

Public School Music 3 

Public Speaking 3 

General Electives 18 

Total 72 

3 The Social Sciences, Economics or Sociology, and Public Speak- 
ing must be elected in Junior or Senior year. 

4. From nine to twelve hours of a major teaching subject and 
from six to twelve hours of a minor teaching subject are required. 

Freshman 

Hours 

Education 1, 2, and 3: Principles of Teaching 3 

English 1: Composition and Rhetoric 3 

Mathematics 1 and 2: Trigonometry and Analytical Geome- 
try 3 

Public School Music 2: Music for Grades 3 

Physical Education 1 2 

Health 1: Principles of Health Education 1 

Required 12 

Six hours to be elected from the following: 

History 1, 2, and 3: American History 3 

Science 1: Inorganic Chemistry 3 

Latin 1: Selections from Horace and Livy 3 

Greek 1: Geginners' Greek 3 

French 1: Beginners' French 3 



STATE NORMAL COLLEGE 21 

Spanish 1: Beginners' Spanish 3 

Total 18 

Sophomore 

Hours 

Education 11, 12, and 13: Psychology 3 

Education 14 and 15: History of Education and Management.- 3 

English 11 and 12: Principles of Poetry and The Short Story__ 3 

Physical Education 11 2 

Health 11: Health Teaching 1 

Required 9 

Six hours to be elected from the following: 
History 10, 11, and 12: Modern Europe, or Science 11, 

Physics - 3 

Latin 11 and 12: Plautus and Terence, or Greek 11, Xenophon's 

Anabasis, or French 11, or Spanish 11 3 

Three hours to be elected from the following subjects if 
begun in the Freshman year: 
History 10, 11, and 12, or Science 11, or Mathematics 11 and 

12, Calculus and Algebra, or Public School Music 11 for 

Grades 5-7 3 

Total 18 

Students who intended to drop out at the end of Sophomore year 
and teach should elect Education 16 and 17, Practice Teaching and 
Conference. 

Junior 

Hours 
Education 22, 23, and 24: Educational Psychology, Tests and 

Measurements 3 

English 21: The Development of the Novel 3 

Twelve hours to be elected from the following groups, not 
more than two subjects to be chosen from one group: 

1. Latin 21, 22, and 23, Tacitus, Pliny, and Sallust; French 

21; Spanish 21 3 

2. Mathematics 21, Calculus; Natural Science 21, Biology; 

Social Science 21, Economics 3 

3. History 20, 21, and 22, American History; Agriculture 21 

and 22, Poultry and Landscape Gardening; Education 21, 
School Law 3 

4. Household Arts: Fine Arts 25 and 26, Aart History and 

Appreciation; Library Methods 3 

5. Physical Education 21, Theory and Practice; Health 21, 

Health Projects; Public Speaking 21, Public School Music 

21, High School Music 3 

Total 18 

Senior 

Hours 
Education 30, 31, and 32: Psychology of Adolescence, Admin- 
istration, and Supervision 3 

Education 33, 34, and 35: Practice Teaching, Secondary Edu- 
cation, and High School Methods 3 



22 STATE NORMAL COLLEGE 

English 31: Development of the Drama 3 

Constitution of the United States And Georgia 1 

Required L 9 

Nine hours to be elected from the following groups, not 
more than two subjects to be chosen from any one group: 

1. Latin 31 and 32: Juvenal and Lucretius; French 31; Span. 

ish 31 3 

2. Mathematics 31, 32: Analytical Geometry, Differential 

Equations; Natural Science 31; Physiological Chemistry; 
Social Science 31: Sociology 3 

3. History 30, 31, and 32: England, Latin America, and World 

Problems; Agriculture 31; Economic Geography; Educa- 
tion 26, 27, and 28: Junior High and Public School Curri- 
culum, and Extra-Curricular Activities 3 

4. Household Arts; Fine Arts; Library Methods 3 

5. Physical Education; Health; Music for the High School 3 

18 
B. S. EDUCATION 

(Household Arts) 

All students who wish to major in Household Arts should take 
the B. S. Course in Household Arts. Students who wish to take 
a two-year course should elect Practice Teaching and Conference 
instead of Education. Two-year students may secure the same li- 
cense as those who take the Certificate Course. 

Requirements for B. S. in Education (Household Arts) 72 hours 
to be distributed as follows: 

Professional Subjects 20-25% 

General Subjects : 25- % 

Household Arts 25-30% 

Related Science and Related Art 25- % 

Freshman 

Education 3, 4, 5: Principles of Teaching 3 

English 1: Composition and Rhetoric 3 

Public School Music 3 

Inorganic Chemistry 3 

Household Arts 2: Food Study and Cookery 1% 

House Arts 3: Elementary Dressmaking 1*4 

Household Arts 4: Textiles 1 

Fine and Industrial Arts 1: Art Structure ' 2 

Physical Education 2 

Health 1 

18 
Sophomore 

Education 6: Psychology 3 

Education 9, 10: History of Education, School Management-- 3 
English 2, 3: Principles of Poetry, Short Story 3 



STATE NORMAL COLLEGE 23 

Household Arts 11: Physiology and Family Health, and 12: 

Nutrition 3 

Household Arts 13: Clothing Selection and Construction 1% 

Household Arts 14: Home Cookery and Table Service 1% 

Household Arts 15: Family Relations, and 16: Home Man- 
agement 2 

Fine and Industrial Arts 17: House Furnishing 1 

Physical Education 2 

Health 1 

18 
Junior 

Household Arts 21: History of Home Economics, and 22: Prob- 
lems in Home Economics, and 23: Teaching Home Eco- 
nomics 3 

Economics or History 3 

Agriculture 21: Poultry, and 22: Landscape Gardening 3 

Organic Chemistry 3 

Household Arts 24: Applied Dress Design, and 25: Advanced 

Dressmaking 3 

Electives from Groups 2, 3, 4, 5, in A. B. Course 3 

18 
Senior 

Education: Practice Teaching 3 

Sociology 3 

Physiological Chemistry and Household Arts 31: Dietetics or 

Textile Chemistry, and Household Arts 32: Millinery__ 3 

Microbiology 2 

Household Arts 33: Advanced Cookery 2 

Household Arts 34: Hygiene of Childhood and Adolescence 2 

Electives from Groups 2, 3, 4, 5, in A. B. Course 3 

18 
Required for B. S. Degree in Education, Fine and Industrial 
Arts Department: 

Education 18 hours 

English 6 hours 

Agriculture 3 hours 

N. Science . 5 hours 

Art 22 hours 

Modern Langue 3 hours 

Social Science 3 hours 

Electives 12 hours 

72 hours 
B. S. EDUCATION 

Fine and Industrial Arts 

Freshman 

Education 3 and 4 or 5: Principles of Teaching 3 

English 1: Composition and Rhetoric 3 

Foreign Language 3 



24 STATE NORMAL COLLEGE 

Art 1, 2: Art Structure, and 3: Drawing . 3 

Art 4, Woodwork; 5, Mechancal Drawing; 6, Art History 3 

Health 1 

Physical Education 2 

15 

Elect one subject: 
History, 3; Mathematics, 3; P. S. Music, 3; Science, 3; Modern 
Language, 3. 

Sophomore 

Education 6, 8, Psychology 3 

Education 9 and 10, History of Education, Management 3 

Household Arts 11, Physiodogy and Family Health; Household 

Arts 12, Nutrition 3 

Art 11, 12, Drawing and Color Work; 13, Art Structure 3 

Art 14, Woodwork; 15, Mechanical Drawing; 16, Pottery 3 

Health 1 

Physical Education 2 

15 

Elect one subject: 
History, 3; Mathematics, 3; P. S. Music, 3; Science, 3; Modern 
Language, 3; English, 3; Practice Teaching. 

Junior 

Education 16, 17, Educational Psy.; 18, Measurements 3 

Agriculture 22, Landscape Gardening; 21, Poultry 3 

Art 21, 22, Drawing and Painting; 23, Home Furnishing 3 

Art 24, Bookbinding; 25, Art History; 26, Art Appreciation-. 3 

12 

Elect two subjects: 

1. Latin, French, Spanish, Greek. 

2. Mathematics, Natural Science, Social Science. 

3. History, Agriculture, Education. 

4. Household Arts, Art History, Library Methods. 

5. Health, Physical Education, Public Speaking, P. S. Music. 

6. English. 

Senior 

Education 19, Psy. of Adolescence; 20, Administration; 21, 

Supervision 3 

Art 33, Methods in Teaching Art 2 

Art 24, Practice Teaching 1 

Art 31, Advanced Drawing and Painting 3 

Art 32, Advanced Ceramics 1 

Household Arts 34, Child Hygiene 2 

12 

Elect two subjects: 

1. Latin, French, Spanish, Greek. 

2. Mathematics, Natural Science, Social Science. 

3. History, Agriculture, Education. 

4. Household Arts, Art History, Library Methods. 



STATE NORMAL COLLEGE 25 

5. Health, Physical Education, Public Speaking, P. S. Music. 

6. English. 

In courses where art materials are required a fee of $1.50 a 
quarter ds charged. 

CERTIFICATE COURSE 






First Year 

Hours 

Education 1C and 2C: Psylchology for Teachers 3 

Education 1, 2, and 3:Principles of Teaching 3 

English 1C: Composition and Syntax 3 

Home Economics; Art 7: Blackboard Drawing; Agriculture 

1C: General Agriculture 3 

Mathematics 1C and 2C: Arithmetic and Algebra Methods 3 

Public School Music 3 

Physical Education 2 

Health 1 

Required 18 

Second Year 

Hours 

Education 14 and 15: History of Education and Management-- 3 

Education 16 and 17: Practice Teaching and Conference 3 

English 2C and 3C: Literature for Grades and American Liter- 
ature 3 

Public Speaking 1C: Methods for Elementary Grades 3 

Science 2C: Geography 3 

History 1C, 2C, and 3C: United States and Georgia 3 

Physical Education 2 

Health 1 

18 
AGRICULTURE AND RURAL SOCIAL SCIENCE 



1C. Agriculture. 

This is a course in general agriculture designed to meet the 
needs of teachers who expect to teach the subject in the public 
schools. The topics studied will be those in a text on general 
agriculture but in addition field trips will be made and laboratory 
work wiill be required, as well as suggestions given for the best 
methods to be used in teaching this subject. 

Three hours per week, one quarter. First year certificate course. 
Credit: 1 hour. 

21. Poultry. 

The breeds of poultry, the care and management, the proper feed- 
ing and the insects and diseases of poultry will form the basis for 



26 STATE NORMAL COLLEGE 

this course. Consideration will be given to the location and con- 
struction of poultry houses. 

Three hours per week, one-half year. Junior. Credit: 1% 
hours. 

22. Landscape Gardening. 

In this course a study will be made of the selection of flowers, 
shrubs and trees suitable for different types of homes and school 
buildings. The proper arrangement and grouping of the plants 
will be emphasized. Rural school grounds will be taken up in 
detail. Drawings of school and home grounds will be required. 

Three hours per week, one-half year. Junior. Credit: 1% 
hours. 
31. Economic Geography. 

Suggestions for the teaching of geography will be studied as well 
as the physical conditions o>f the earth and how these relate to the 
growth, development and welfare of the human race. Such gen- 
eral topics as climate and natural vegetation, land forms, soils, 
mineral deposits, water and natural environment will constitute a 
large part of this course. 

Three hours per week. Senior. Credit: 3 hours. 

11. Rural Economics. 

This course takes up some of the most salient features of the 
rural problems with empahisis on the rural conditions in Georgia 
and their effects on rural social life. County and community re- 
ports are made. 

Three hours per week, one quarter. Second year certificate 
course. Credit: 1 hour. 

12. Rural Sociology. 

This course is designed to give an interest and appreciation in 
rural life and rural life problems with emphasis on present ten- 
dencies and future growth in Georgia. The United States Census 
reports, and all available state house reports, are used in connection 
with the text book. 

Three hours per week, one quarter. Second year certificate 
course. Credit: 1 hour. 

21. Economics. 

This course involves a study of the present economic conditions, 
and the necessity of improving these conditions. Economic develop- 
ment; the factors of production; rent and present-day rent prob- 
lems; income; co-operation and credits; marketing; taxation and 
commerce. 



STATE NORMAL COLLEGE 27 

Three hours per week throughout the year. Junior. Credit: 3 
hours. 
31. Sociology. 

This course takes up a study of the evolution of rural social con- 
ditions, the relation of physical environment to the several types of 
communities, economic and other causes which underlie changes in 
population, the present condition of rural communities, and existing 
rural social organizations, their functions, efficiency and present 
status. The influence of such factors as production, transportation, 
communication, land tenure, sanitation, and rural social, religious 
and educational organizations upon the general welfare of rural 
communities, the improvement of such influence, and the use of the 
survey to ascertain rural social needs are topics which receive care- 
ful consideration. 

Three hours per week throughout the year. Senior Degree 
Course. Credit: 3 hours. 

EDUCATION 

Id Introductory Psychology For Teachers. 

This course will deal with such aspects of psychology are as help- 
ful in understanding human action. 

Required of all first year certificate students. 

Three hours per week, One quarter. Credit: 1 hour. 

2C. Child Psychology for Teachers. 

This course deals with the psychology and school care of the 
child. Designed to give an understanding of the proper technique 
in the management and educational direction of children. 

Prerequisite: Education lc. 

Required of all first year certificate students. 

Three hours per week. Two quarters. Credit: 2 hours. 

3c. Common School Review. 

Provision will be made to give a rapid review of the common 
school branches to those who need the review. 

1. Principles of Teaching. 

An introductory course planning an overview of the general prob- 
lems of school procedure. It is based on the laws of psychology 
and their use in the actual work of teaching. Use is made of 
modern scientific psychology and recent investigations in the field 
of eudcation. 

Three hours per week, one quarter. Freshman and First Year 
certificate. Credit: 1 hour. 



28 STATE NORMAL COLLEGE 

2. Principles of Teaching in the Elementary Grades 

An intensive study is made of the problems met in directing pupil 
activities in the intermediate grades. The following subjects are 
taken up: readng, arithmetic, English, spelling, and the social 
sciences. Provision is made for observation and report of demon- 
stration lessons in the laboratory schools. 

Three hours per week, two 'quarters. Freshman and First Year 
certificate. Credit: 2 hours. 

3. Principles of Teaching in the Primary Grades. 

This course in intended to carry on the general work in pdinci- 
ples of teaching, as specifically applied to the first four grades. 
Topics relating to equipment, books, games, materials, activities 
and methods will be taken up. Observation of individual children 
and classes will be carried on under supervision as a part of the 
course. 

Three hours per week, two quarters. Required of Freshmen and 
First Year certificate students. Credit: two hours. 
J 11. General Psychology. 

An introductory course providing a brief survey of the general 
field of modern psychology. Laboratory. 

Required of all Sophomores. Three hours per week, one quart- 
er. Credit: two hours. 

12. Psychology of Childhood. 

A study of some of the major topics of physical and mental 
growth of child from birth to adolescence. Emphasis is placed on 
the application of modern science in training and educating chil- 
dren. 

Observation and case work. 

Prerequisite: Education 11. 

Required of all Sophomores three hours per week, one quarter. 
Credit: 1 hour. 

13. Psychology and Treatment of Exceptional Children. 

A study of the children that deviate from the usual and an 
analysis of types of adjustment. Case work. 

Prerequisite: Education 11 and 12. 

Required of all Sophomores three hours per week, one quarter. 
Credit: 1 hour. 

14. History of Education. 

A study of the educational ideals, practices and tendencies of the 
past, the great educational reformers, and the principles derived 
from them, the origin and development of modern educational 
theory and practice. The work will be given in two divisions. 
The first quarter will cover the developments in education up to 



STATE NORMAL COLLEGE 29 

1800. The second quarter will be a study of more modern tenden- 
cies. 

Three hours per week, two quarters. Required for Sophomores 
and second year Certificate students. Credit: 2 hours. 

15. School and Oass Management. 

This course undertakes to prepare the student to understand the 
various problems which will arise in connection with the school, 
other than instruction. It deals witty routine, daily program, at- 
tendance, hygiene conditions, discipline, incentives, coercives, 
records and grading and the teacher's relations to school officers and 
the community. 

Three hours per week, one quarter. Sophomore and Second 
Year certificate. Credit: 1 hour. 

16. Practice Teaching and Observation. 

The members of the class are required to do practice teaching 
throughout the year in the various grades of the Training School 
and to co-operate in the work of the Rural School under the super- 
vision and guidance of the head of the Department of Education 
and the Principal of the Training School, with the sympathetic and 
constructive criticism of skilled critic teachers. Before teaching, 
detailed lesson plans are prepared and submitted for criticism. 

Two hours per week throughout the year. Elective sophomore 
and required Second year certificate. Credit: 2 hours. 

17. Conferences. 

The officers of the Department of Education, the officers and teach- 
ers of the Training School, and all the members of the Senior class 
meet once a week for conference and discussion of the work of the 
Training Schools and vital educational problems in general. 

One hour per week throughout the year. Elective Sophomore 
and required Second year certificate. Credit: 1 hour. 

31. Term Paper. 

Original investigation of some important phase of education, with 
a written report thereon, is required of members of the Senior 
class. 

21. School Law. 

A course of lectures on the salient provisions of the laws relating 
to the common school' systems of the state. 
Special periods. Junior, Senior. 

22. Educational Psychology. Part I. 

A general survey of the major topics in the field with special 
emphasis on the process of learning. Laboratory. 



30 STATE NORMAL COLLEGE 

Prerequisite: Education 3, 4 or 5, and 11, 12, 13. 
Required of all Juniors three hours per week. One quarter. 
Credit: 1 hour. 

23. Educational Psychology. Part II. 

Deals with intellectual conditions which aid in the mastery of 
school subjects. An appreciation of the principles which underlie 
successful guidance of learning. Laboratory. 

Prerequisite: Education 14. 

Required of all Juniors three hours per week. One quarter. 
Credit: 1 hour. 

24. Testing and Measurements. 

This course is planned to give a working knowledge of the more 
important standard tests for measuring the ability and achieve- 
ment of elementary and high school children. Practice in admin- 
istering tests and interpreting results will be an important part of 
this course. Special consideration will be given to the use of stand- 
ard tests in diagnosing, classifying and evaluating the progress of 
children in various school subjects. Intelligence tests, readings, 
laboratory work. 

Prerequisite: Education 3, 4, or 5, and 11, 12, 13. 

Three hours per week, one quarter. Junior. Credit: 1 hour. 

30. Psychology of Adolescence. 

A careful study of the experimental evidence in the guidance and 
training of the adolescent and the application to problems of ad- 
justment. 

Prerequisite: Education 22, 23, 24. 

Required of all Seniors. Three hours per week, one quarter. 
Credit: 1 hour. 

31. City, State and County School Administration. 

This is a study of the principles underlying an efficient state 
school system, both city and county, with special reference to the 
present and future needs of Georgia. Topics studied will include: 
educational surveys; the federal government in public education;, 
school funds; school budgets; selection, preparation, certification 
and improvements of teachers; school libraries; buildings and equip- 
ment; economy and efficiency. Field work and practical work re- 
quired. 

Prerequisite: Education 23. 

Three hours per week, one quarter. Senior. Credit: 1 hour. 

32. School Supervision. 

The purpose of this course is the preparation of supervisors and 
supervising principles. This course considers the problems of the 



STATE NORMAL COLLEGE 31 

superintendents and principles in relation to attendance, organiza- 
tion, classification, marking systems, promotion plans, acceleration, 
retardation, elimination of pupils, records and reports. It will con- 
sider the function of the supervisor, methods of supervision and 
effective devices used by supervisors. Criticism and improvement 
of instruction and standards for judging instruction. Practical 
work. 

Prerequisite: Education 23. 

Three hours per week, one quarter. Senior. Credit: 1 hour. 

88. Practice Teaching. 

Practice Teaching In Special teaching subject in high school or 
teaching and supervision in Elementary Schools. 

Three hours per week, one quarter. Required of Seniors. Credit: 
1 hour. 

23. Primary Methods and Supervision. 

This course is designed to give a thorough survey of the primary 
grades as influenced by modern educational theory, by recent ex- 
periments, and by special studies in subject matter. There will 
be observation lessons in almost all the subjects and activities of 
the primary school. The work will be adapted to benefit primary 
teachers, supervisors and principals. 

Prerequisite: Education 3, 5, 6, 7, 8, 16, 17, 18. 

Three hours per week, two quarters. Elective for Juniors and 
Seniors. Credit: 2 thous. 

84. Secondary Education. 

A survey of the objectives, curricula, and general technic of 
secondary education. This course is designed to give an intensive 
study of the problems in modern high school precedure. It will 
involve the psychology of high school subjects, type lessons and 
practical work. 

Prerequisites: Education 3, 4, 6, 7, 8, 16, 17, 18. 

Three hours per week, one quarter.. Senior. Credit: 1 hour. 

35. General Methods of Teaching in High Schools. 

Problems involved in the presentation of special subjects in the 
high school, emphasis being placed upon pupil adjustment <*nd 
directed study. 

Prerequisites: Education, 3, 4, 6, 7, 8, 16, 17, IS. 

Three hours per week, one quarter. Senior. Credit: 1 hour. 

30. The Junior High School. . 

A survey of the Junior High School Movement with emphasis 
upon adjustment of curriculum and method to adolescent need. 
Prerequisites: 3, 4, 6, 7, 8. 



32 STATE NORMAL COLLEGE 

Three hours per week, one quarter. Elective for Junior and 
Senior. Credit: 1 hour. 

27. Public School Ourriculiim. 

An intensive study of the curricula of the Elementary and Junior 
High Schools as they are related to social conditions and needs, in- 
cluding: the historical development of the course of study, and 
basic principles for the selection, grading, and organization of pub- 
lic school subjects. Curricula from different sections of the United 
States are compared. 

Prerequisites: 3, 4, 6, 7, 8. 

Three hours per week, one quarter. Elective for Junior and 
Senior. Credit: 1 hiur. 

28. Extra-Curricular Activities. 

This course will treat the following topics: (1) The place' of 
extra-curricular activities in the school. (2) Main forms of such 
activities, as Language Clubs; Athletic Associations; Literary So- 
cieties; Class Organizations; Chapel participation. (3) Methods 
of conducting programs, sources of mattrial, and illustrations from 
prominent schools. 

Prerequisite: Education 23 or 24. 

Three hours per week, one quarter. Elective for Junior or 
Senior. Credit: 1 hour. 

TRAINING SCHOOL 

The Training School is a laboratory of the Normal School. It 
is a well organized department of Primary, Intermediate, Junior 
and Senior High School pupils. 

This laboratory serves for teachers, the three distinct purposes of 
practice', demonstration and experimental teaching. 

Freshmen are permitted to do observation in the Training School 
and Seniors are required to do four months of actual teaching be- 
fore graduation. 

This work is very carefully supervised by the critic teachers in 
charge of the grades. 

Before any student is permitted to do practice teaching in the 
Training School, the equivalent of academic and professional work 
as given in the Junion class of the State Normal School must be 
satisfactorily completed. 

The course of study in all the grades is in accordance with 
present progressive educational tendencies and is made in co-opera- 



STATE NORMAL COLLEGE 33 

tion with the Department of Education of the Normal School. The 
following is the course of study for the Junior and Senior High 
School. 

seventh Ninth 

Required Required 

English __________5 English __________5 

Math. (Arith.) _5 Algebra _ _ _ 5 

Social Sciences: Hist. Ancient ________ 5 

Geography ________ 5 Music App. _ __ 1 

Amer. History ______ 5 Physical Education _____ 2 

Science (Hygiene) _____ 5 Elect. One or Two 

Music Appreciation _____ 2 Science (Biol.) _______ 5 

Physical Education _____ 2 Latin ___________5 

Sewing or Woodwork _ _ _ _ 2 Elect One or None 

Dom. Arte 5 

Fine Arts _________5 

STATE NORMAL ACADEMY 
General Information 

The High School Department of the Normal School was fully 
organized as a separate department in September, 1925. It is com- 
posed of both Junior and Senior Departments — Grades 7 and 8 in 
the Junior High; Grades 9, 10, and 11 in the Senior High. 

The purpose of this school is ot only to give high school education 
to worthy students but also to provide a high school laboratory for 
the students of the Normal School. 

Admission 

Due to the type of our work only a limited number of students 
can be accepted for each grade. Applicants for the Seventh and 
Eighth grades must present promotion certificates from the school 
last attended. Applicants for all other grades must present all 
previous high school credits before they can be classified. 

Students entering grades Seven and Eight must pay an incidental 
fee of ten ($lh.00) dollars $5.00 payable upon entrance and $5.00 
in January. All texts for the Junior High are furnished, but note 
books, pencils, etc., must be furnished* by the student. 

Each local student of the Senior High is required to par a 
matriculation fee of $10.00 upon entrance. In addition to the 
$10.00 fee for matriculation, boarding students must pay $5.00 
for library and infirmary fees. No texts are furnished in this 
department. 

Uniform 

Only boarding students are required to wear the Normal College 
uniform. 

All girls in the Senior High School are required to take Physical 
Education, unless excused by a written permit from a physician. 
Each girl furnishes her own uniform gymnasium suit. 



34 



STATE NORMAL COLLEGE 



Hours and Credits 

The Junior High School has classes five days each week, with 
six fifty minute periods. 

The Senior High School has classes six days, just as the Normal 
College. 

Reports are sent out for parents' inspection quarterly. 

Final exams are given twice yearly but no mid-term promotions 
are made. Failures in two subjects will retain a student in a 
grade. For credit in any subject a student must obtain an average 
of 70 per cent. 



OUTLINE COURSE OF STUDY 



State Normal Academy 



Seventh Grade 



Required 

English 

Mathematics - 
Georgraphy _ 
History _ _ _ 
Science _ _ _ 
Domsetic Arts 
Wood Work _ 



Uni 



Vx 



Ninth Grade 



Required Units 

English 1 

Algebra 1 

Early E. History 1 

Biology 1 

Eelect one or none. 

Latin 1 

Domestic Arts 1 

Fine Arts 1 



Eighth Grade 

Required Units 

English 1 

Methematics 1 

History 1 

General Science ______ 1 

Domestic Arts 

Wood Work 

Elect one or none. 

Latin 1 

Phys. Geog. 1 

Tenth Grade 

Required Units 

English 1 

Plane Geometry 1 

Modern History 1 

Physics 1 

Elect one or none. 

Latin 1 

Spanish ___________ 

French 1 

Domestic Arts ________ 

Fine Arts ____-_--_l 



Eleventh Grade 



Required Units 

English .-_ 1 

U. S. History 1 

Elect two or three. 
Mathematics _________ 

Chemistry __________ 



Latin ____________ 

Spanish ___________ 

French 1 

Domestic Arts 1 

Fine Arts __________ 



Music and Physical Education are required of all students in the 
High School Department. One-half hour credit given for each 
course yearly. 



STATE NORMAL COLLEGE 35 

Minimum requirements for graduation 16 units from unit studies. 
No credit is given for less than two years of any foreign language. 
No elective is give nto less than shrdl uuon etaoin shrdlu taoin 
Adjustments of credits offered by students entering from other 
schools will be made by the High School faculty. 

ENGLISH 

1C. Composition and Syntax. 

Methods and Review for Elementary Teachers. Three hours a 
week throughout the year. Empahis in this course is placed on 
method, but a thorough review of subject matter is required. Three 
hours credit for certificate students. Mr. Brown. 
2C. Literature for Elementary Schools. 

The selection and classification of stories and poems for the differ- 
ent grades and the methods of presenting them to children. Three 
hours a week for one quarter. One hour's credit for certificate 
students. Mr. Brown. 
SO. American Literature. 

Three hours a week for two quarters. A study of the lives and 
works of the leading American writers. Required of all certificate 
students and optional for degree students. Two hours credit to- 
ward certificate or degree. Miss Law. 
7. Composition and Rhetoric. 

Required of Freshmen. A study of principles accompanied by 
the production and criticism of themes. Three hours a week. Three 
hours credit. Prerequisite; entrance requirements. Misses Law 
and Walker and Mr. Brown. 

11. Principles of Poetry. 

Required of Sophomores. Three hours a week for two quarters. 
Two hours credit. The elements of poetry and its scansion. Pre- 
requisite: English 1 or its equivalent. Misses Law and Walker and 
Mr. Brown. 

12. The Short Story. 

Required of Sophomores. Three hours a week for one quarter. 
One hour's credit. A study of the construction of the Short Story 
and practice in its composition. Prerequisite: English 1. Misses 
Law and Walker and Mr. Brown. 
21. The Novel. 

Required of Juniors in the A. B. Course. Three hours a week 
for two quarters. Two hour's credit. Mr. Brown. 



36 STATE NORMAL COLLEGE 

22. The Essay. 

Required of Juniors in the A. B. Course. Three hours a week 
for one quarter. One hour's credit. Miss Walker. 

31. The Drama. 

Required of Seniors in the A. B. Course. Three hours a week 
througout the year. Three hour's credit. Miss Walker and Mr. 
Brown. 

FINE AND INDUSTRIAL ARTS 



1. Principles of Art Structure. 

A study of the principles underlying Art Structure. Original de- 
signs worked out to illustrate the principles. Illustration in works 
of art discussed. Three double hours per week first quarter. Credit 
1 hour. 

2. A Continuation of the Course Art 1 With More Advanced Work. 
Three double hours per week second quarter. Credit: 1 hour. 

3. Freehand Drawing. 

Practice in freehand drawing. Perspective, light and shade and 
composition are included in the course. 

Three double hours per week third quarter. Credit: 1 hour. 

4 Woodwork. 

Simple articles made of wood. Emphasis is put on correct con- 
struction, pleasing design, and wood finishing. 

Three double hours per second quarter. Credit: 1 hour. 

5. Mechanical Drawing. 

Execution of a series of plates illustrating the principles of me- 
chanical drawing. 

Three double hours per week first quarter. Credit: 1 hour. 

6. Art History. 

A study of the history of American Art. 

Three single hours per week third quarter. Credit: 1 hour. 

7. Blackboard Drawing. 

This course is planned to meet the needs of teachers who wish 
to use blackboard drawings for illustrations. i 

Three single hours per week for two quarters. Certificate credit. 

11. Drawing and Color. 

More advanced drawing than that given in course 3. Theory 
and practice in the use of color. 






STATE NORMAL COLLEGE 37 

Three double hours, per week for two quarters. Credit: 1 hour. 

12. Drawing and Color. 

Continuation of Course 11. 

Three double hours per week second quarter. Credit: 1 hour. 

13. Art Structure. 

Advanced problems in art structure. Various articles decorated. 
Three double hours per week third quarter. Credit: 1 hour. 

14. Woodwork. 

More advanced problems in woodwork than those given the first 
year. 

Three double hours per week second quarter. Credit: 1 hour. 

15. Mechanical Drawing. 

More advanced exercises in Mechanical drawing. 

Three double hours per week first quarter. Credit: 1 hour. 

16. Pottery. 

Different types of pottery made, decorated and fired. 

Three double periods per week third quarter. Credit: 1 hour. 

17. Home Furnishing. 

A study of the principles underlying the Art of furnishing a home. 
The course includes lectures on the different types of domestic archi- 
tecture, furnishings suitable for various types, period furniture, the 
arrangement of furniture, color in the home, the location, site, costs. 

Practice is given in working out floor plans, wall elevation, and 
arrangement of furniture. 

Three double hours per week one quarter. Credit: 1 hour. 

21. Drawing and Painting. 

Practice in mode advanced drawing and painting. Cast, still life, 
figure and landscape. 

Three double hours per week first quarter. Credit: 1 hour. 

22. Drawing and Painting. 

Continuation of Course 21. 

Three double hours per week second quarter. Credit: 1 hour. 

23. Home Furnishing. 

Principles of art structure applied to the furnishing of a home. 
Original designs for various parts of the interior and for various 
article in the home. 

Three double hours per week third quarter. Credit: 1 hour. 



38 STATE NORMAL COLLEGE 

24. Bookbinding. 

Lectures and laboratory work dealing witb problems in binding 
different kinds of books. Decoration of books. 

Three double periods per week first quarter. Credit: 1 hour. 

25. Ait History. 

A history of the development of art through the ages. 

Three single hours per week second quarter. Credit: 1 hour. 

26. Art Appreciation. 

This course is planned for the purpose of developing a keener 
appreciation of art through an intelligent understandingof real art 
qualities wherever they are found. 

Three single hours per week third quarter. Credit: 1 hour. 

31. Advanced Drawing and Painting. 

Theory and practice in advanced drawing and painting. Outdoor 
sketching, figure construction, still life compositions. 

Three double hours per week for three quarters. Credit: 3 hours. 

32. Advanced Ceramics. 

More advanced problems in pottery and china decoration. 
Three double hours per week one quarter. Credit: 1 hour. 

33. Methods in Teaching Art. 

A study of different methods of teaching art. Observation in 
the practice school. Different types of lesson plans suitable for 
the various units of work. 

Three single hours per week for two quarters. Credit: 2 hours. 

34. Practice Teaching. 

Practice in teaching art — given in the practice school. 
Three hours per week for one quarter. Credit: 1 hour. 

HEALTH EDUCATION. 



1. Principles of Health Education. 

An introductory course which presents the principles of healthy 
living, and application of these principles to individual and com- 
munty health. 

One hour a week, throughout the year. Freshman and first year 
of two year Certificate Course. Credit: 1 hour. 

10. Health Teaching. 

This course deals with the program of Health Education from the 
standpoint of the teacher and includes a study of problems and 
methods. 



STATE NORMAL COLLEGE 39 

One hour a week, throughout the year. Sophomore and second 
year of two year Certificate Course. Credit: 1 hour. 
11. Practice Teaching. 

Actual class-room teaching under careful supervision. 
One hour a week for twelve weeks. Sophomores and second year 
of two year Certificate Course — elective with credit. (See Ed. 6). 

21. Health Projects. 

Projects which are worked out by individuals or groups accord- 
ing to their needs. Conference and a thesis required. 

Three hours a week, throughout the year. Junior Degree elec- 
tive. Credit: 3 hours. 

HISTORY AND POLITICAL SCIENCE 



History 

1. American History, 1700-1800. Fall Quarter. 

A survey course beginning with a study of the social and eco- 
nomic conditions at the close of the first century of colonization and 
including a study of the various types of colonial governments. 

Elective for Freshmen. 3 hours per week. 1 quarter. Credit: 
1 hour. 

2. American History, 1800-1865. AVinter Quarter. 

A continuation of History 1. The course includes a study of the 
foreign complications leading into the second war with England; 
the consolidation of the new west; the tariff controversy; financial 
readjustments; removal of Indians beyond the Mississippi; west- 
ward expansion; Jacksonian democracy; the slavery controversy; 
secession and war; emancipation; foreign relations; and the eco- 
nomics of the war. 

Elective for Freshmen. 3 hours per week. 1 quarter. Credit: 
1 hour. 

3. American History, 1865.-1927. Spring Quarter. 

A continuation of History 2. The course includes a study of the 
problems of reconstruction; radical ideas in congress; the negro 
problem in the South;' carpet bag rule; the rebuilding of political 
parties; railroad and commercial expansion; the new era of indus- 
trial consolidation; growth of organized labor and regulating leg- 
islation; the agrarian movement; the United States as a world 
power; Roosevelt and Wilson Americanism; the World War, and 
problems growing out of it; and some of the current national 
problems. 



40 STATE NORMAL COLLEGE 

Elective for Freshmen. 3 hour* per week. 1 quarter. Credit: 
1 hour. 

10. Early Modern Europe, 1500-1815. Fall Quarter. 

A survey course including a study of those phases of the later 
medieval period which vitally affected the development of the na- 
tions of western Europe; the development of important nations; 
the reformation and its results upon both the Catholic and the 
Protestant churches; the new spirit of education and missionary 
zeal; the beginnings of the expansion of European nations to other 
continents and the growth of colonial empires; national and re- 
ligious rivalry in the seventeenth and enighteenth centuries; the 
tligious rivalry in the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries; the 
French Revolution; and the revolutionary and Napoleonic eras in 
Europe with their resultant social and economic changes. 

Elective for Sophomores. 3 hours per week. 1 quarter. Credit: 
1 hour. 

11. Modern Europe, 1815-1914. Winter Quarter. 

A continuation of History 10. The course begins with a study 
of the congress of Vienna and its attempt to restore Europe to 
what it was before the French Revolution. 

Electic for S'ophomores. 3 hours per week. 1 quarter. Credit: 
1 hour. 

12. Europe Since 1914. Spring Quarter. 

A continuation of History 11. The course begins with a review 
of the international situation on the eve of the World War. It "in- 
cludes such topics as the Russian Revolution; the Versailles Con- 
ference; the post war situation in the Balkan countries; the for- 
tunes of the newly craeted European states; the League of Nations 
at work; and danger zones dn Europe today. 

Elective for Sophomores. 3 hours per week. 1 quarter. Credit: 
1 hour. 

1C. The United States Since 1829. Fall Quarter. 

To be discontinued after 1927. 

A survey course completing a course begun during the term of 
1926-1927. 

Required of second year Certificate Students. 3 hours per week. 
1 quarter. Credit: 1 hour. 
2C. History of Georgia. Winter Quater. 

This course begins with a study of the colonial institutions in 
Georgia. It traces the political, social, and economic life of the 
people of the state from colonial days: to the present time. Special 






STATE NORMAL COLLEGE 41 

attention will be given to a study of the economic resources of the 
state and recent efforts to develop and utilize these resources more 
fully. 

Required of second year Certificate Students. 3 hours per week. 
1 quarter. Credit: 1 hour. 

3C. The Teaching of History in Elementary Schools. Spring Quarter. 

This course begins with a brief study of the development of his- 
tory instruction in the schools. The course includes a study of the 
aims and values of history instruction; the course of study; meth- 
ods and materials for the several grades; testing results; school 
problems relating to history such as the place of history in the 
curriculum, and the relation of history to other subjects. 

Required of second year Certificate Students. 3 hours per week. 
1 quarter. Credit: 1 hour. 

20. The American Revolution. Fall Quarter. 

Prerequisite: History 1. 

An intensive study of the governmental, social, economic, and 
political relationships existing between the American colonies and 
the mother country. The topics treated includes the following: 
The development of self-government in the colonies; judicial pro- 
cedure and judicial disallowance of colonial legislation; commercial 
legislation affecting the colonies; colonial and British ideas of rep- 
resentation; the loyalists; foreign relations; peace negotiations; 
the peace treaty. Source materials will be used wherever possible. 

Elective for Juniors. 3 hours per week. 1 quarter. Credit: 1 
hour. 

21. Secession and Reconstruction, 1850-1870. Winter Quarter. 

Prerequisite: History 2. 

This is a library course dealing with the social, economic, and 
political situation in the South just before and immediately after 
the War Between the States. 

Elective for Juniors. 3 hours per week. 1 quarter. Credit: 
1 hour. 

22. Recent United States. Spring Quarter. 

Prerequisite: History 3. 

A course dealing with such topics as industrial and commercial 
expansion; growth of corporations, pools, trusts, and combines; or- 
ganized labor and regulating legislation; demands for a merchant 
marine; tariff, banking, and currency legislation; the agrarian 
movement; civil service and the merit system; our international 
relations; current issues. 



4 2 STATE NORMAL COLLEGE 

Elective for Juniors. 3 hours per week. 1 quarter. Credit: 
1 hour. 

23. The Westward Movement in American History. Pall Quarter. 

The following topics are treated: The westward movement as 
an historical process; the westward movement in colonial history; 
causes which led to migration from the eastern states; occupation 
of the region between the Adleghenies and the Mississippi; the land 
policy of the United States; reaction of the west upon national poli- 
cies; expansion into Florida, Louisiana, and the Oregon country; 
acquisition of Texas and the Mexican War; discovery of gold in Cali- 
fornia and the resultant gold rush; settlement of Utah; the coming 
of the new west and the passing of the old frontier conditions. Ef- 
fect of the passing of the frontier upon eastern and southern 
United States. 

Required of Industrial Juniors. 3 hours per week. 1 quarter. 
Credit: 1 hour. 

24. Social, Industrial, and Economic History of the United States. 

Winter and Spring Quarters. 

In this course current social, industriail and economic conditions 
are traced from the beginnings. European conditions which fur- 
nish traceable influence are considered. Some of the subjects treated 
are the natural resources; the influence of cheap land; the effect of 
inventions, machinery and science; the development of agriculture 
and of manufacturing; the rise of great industries; capitalism, 
business combination, and labor organization; the efforts of labor 
to better conditions; recent social legislation. 

Required of Industrial Juniors. 3 hours per week. 2 quarters. 
Credit: 2 hours. 

30. The Development of the British Empire. Pall Quarter. 
Prerequisite: History 11. 

This course treats of the acquisition of the great colonies; com- 
mercial relations prior to 1800; the development of self-govern- 
ment; missionary movements of the nineteenth century; secret 
diplomacy and the expansion of Asia and Africa; India; the Empire 
in Africa; the Empire during the World War; and efforts to bring 
about improved imperial organization. 

Elective for Seniors. 3 hours per week. 1 quarter. Credit: 
1 hour. 

31. Latin America. Winter Quarter. 

Prerequisite: History 11. 

A survey of the history of Brazil and the Spanish-American Re- 
publics. This course treates briefly the colonial history of these 



STATE NORMAL COLLEGE 43 

countries and the winning of their independence. Their political 
and economic growth is traced. 

Elective for Seniors. 3 hours per week. 1 quarter. Credit: 
1 hour. 

32. Imperialism and World Problems. Spring Quarter. 

Prerequisite: History 11. 

The following topics are among those considered: Territorial 
expansion of the various nations since 1880; national rivalry in the 
race for colonies; adjustment of old difficulties and a realignment 
of European powers; the position of the Balkan states in European 
society; the upset of the balance of power between the two major 
European groups; the World War; disposition made of outlying 
territories belonging to central powers; possible effect of Germany's 
entrance into the League; other imperial problems threatening the 
peace of the world. 

Elective for Seniors. 3 hours per week. 1 quarter. Credit: 
1 hour. 

Political Science 



16. Essentials of American Government. Fall Quarter. 

Not offered in 1927. 

An introductory course covering the essentials of American gov- 
ernment. The course includes a study of the functions of the va- 
rious branches and departments of government; nomination and 
election practices; congress at work; the relation of state to fed- 
eral government; and types and functions of local governments. 

Required of second year Certificate Students. 3 hours per week. 
1 quarter. Credit: 1 hour. 

27. Government of the United States. Pall Quarter. 

A detailed study of the origin of the federal government; the 
selection and the powers of the president; congress and its relations 
to other departments; the federal judiciary; conduct of elections; 
the actual work of the national government; foreign relations; the 
preservation of peace and the enforcement of law; police power and 
social legislation; relations to the state and local governments. 

Elective for Juniors. 3 hours per week. 1 quarter. Credit: 
1 hour. 

28. State Government. Winter Quarter. 

The relations of state government to the national government; 
common features of state constitution; the field of state legislation; 
operation of the state government and its importance to the indi- 
vidual; the enforcement of laws; local government and its signifi- 



44 STATE NORMAL COLLEGE 

cance to the individual; state and local finances; popular partici- 
pation in governmental activities; sources of information for the 
study of state and (local government. Plans for making state and 
local government more efficient. Georgia government will be used 
constantly for illustrative purposes. 

Elective for Juniors. 3 hours per week. 1 quarter. Credit: 
1 hour. 

29. Municipal Government. Spring Quatrer. 

The growth of cities; their relation to trade and industry; state 
control over cities; the development of the American city; services 
to the people; city planning; the commission form of government; 
the city manager; other recent movements. 

34. Comparative Government. Fall Quarter. 

A comparative study of the governmental institutions of the lead- 
ing world powers. British and American institutions will be used 
as a bases of comparison. 

Elective for Seniors. 3 hours per week. 1 quarter. Credit: 
1 hour. 

35. American Diplomacy. Winter Quarter. 

Prerequisite: History 1, 2, and 3, or their equivalent. 

Topics treated will include the following: Foreign relations under 
the Federalists; the establishment of an American foreign policy; 
Jefferson and the acquisition of Louisiana; arbitration of boundary 
disputes; the Monroe Doctrine; the open door policy; co-operation 
with other powers in the settlement of international problems in 
Asia, Africa and Europe; control of immigration; the Hague con- 
ferences; diplomatic organization and procedure; the recognition of 
new governments; the World Court; the League of Nations; the 
Washington Conference. The debt problem and other issues. 

Elective for Seniors. 3 hours per week. 1 quarter. Credit: 
1 hour. 

36. International Relations. 

A study of the principles governing the relations of civilized na- 
tions, which includes the problems of citizenship; the position of 
aliens and of alien enemies; the rights of nations with respect to 
war, neutrality, and intervention, and the regard for treaties. Amer- 
ican ideals, Pan-American ism, and the League of Nations are 
among the topics treated. 

Elective for Seniors. 3 hours per week. 1 quarter. Credit: 
1 hour. 



STATE NORMAL COLLEGE 45 

HOUSEHOLD ARTS 



I. Personal Regimen. 

This course is planned to meet the needs of all college students 
in relation to their daily problems in dress, food, the care of the 
person, use of money and time, etiquette of student life. Required 
of all Certificate Students. 

Three hours per week, first term. Credit: 1 hour. 
2T Food Study and Cookery. 

The subject matter of this course will deal with the source, com- 
position, selection, preparation and cookery of typical foods used in 
the home and in the teaching of elementary cookery. It will also 
deal with the application of the general principles of cookery to a 
wide range of food materials. 

This course is fundamental for all teachers of cookery. 

Three (laboratory periods per week, 18 weeks. Credit: iy 2 hours. 

3. Elementary Dressmaking. 

This course includes the fundamental processes of elementary 
sewing. Emphasis is placed on selection of materials with relation 
to design, utility, durability, and cost; and the care and repair of 
clothing. Simple garments are made for which both drafted and 
commercial patterns are used. Good technique and high standards 
of workmanship are stressed. 

Three laboratory periods per week, 18 weeks. Credit: 1% 
hours. 

4. Textiles. 

This course comprises the history and development of textiles, 
the study of fibers, and the identificaion of fabrics; with emphasis 
on those points which affect the appearance, wearing qualities, 
prices and uses of materials. Correlation of subject matter is made 
wih other clothing subjects. 

Three hours per week, one term. Credit: 1 hour. 

II. Physiology and Family Health. 

This course deals with the structure and function of the human 
organs of digestion, absorption, circulation, respiration, metablism, 
and exertion, etc., and their relation to human nutrition and pub- 
lic hygiene. Practical lessons in home nursing are included. 

Three hours per week, 18 weeks. Credit: 1 *£ hours. 
12. Nutrition. 

This course presents the fundamental principles of human nutri- 
tion and their application to the feeding of individuals, families 
and school groups under varying physiological and economic con- 



4 6 STATE NORMAL COLLEGE 

ditions. Special emphasis is placed upon the proper diet for in- 
fants and young children. The selection of subject matter, the 
adaption of material and methods of presentation for elementary 
and high school pupils are discussed. 

Three hours per week, 18 weeks. Creddt: 1^ hours. 

13. Clothing Selection and Construction. 

Pattern construction and alteration with application in silk and 
wool problems. Emphasis is placed upon the choice, care and cost 
of materials and suitable accessories, including selection, care and 
construction of simple hats. 

Three laboratory periods per week, 18 weeks. Credit: 1^ hours. 

14. Home Cookery and Table Service. 

The purpose of this course is the application of the general 
principles of cookery to the preparation of menus and meals for 
the home. It also includes the study and execution of different 
forms of table service as applied to different types and meals and 
special occasions. Practical problems are provided for the plan- 
ning, purchasing, preparation and serving of food for groups under 
pressure of economy of time, money and effort. 

Three laboratory periods per week, 18 weeks. Credit: 1% hours. 

15. Family Relationship. 

A study of the function of the home, responsibility of each in- 
dividual to the home, elements that contribute to the happiness of 
the home and to the character building of the individual. 

Three hours per week, one term. Credit: 1 hour. 

16. Home Management. (Diploma Course). 

This course is designed to give the students actual practical ex- 
perience and skill in the organization and management of the home, 
to test the, ability of the student, and to set social relations and 
standards. It consists of class discussions and problems based on 
problems arising in Practice House administration. Every Home 
Economics student is required to live iij the house at least thirty 
days. 

Three hours per week, one term. Credit: 1 hour. 

21. History of Home Economics. 

A survey of the development of Home Economics in education 
to give the student a background for a better understanding of its 
scope and promotion. 

Three hours per week, one term. Credit: 1 hour. 

22. Problems in Home Economics. 

This course is organized around the special needs of the Home 



STATE NORMAL COLLEGE 47 

Economic teacher. It includes problems of instruction, manage- 
ment, school and community relationships, the course of study, use 
of text and reference books, Home Economics tests and scales, 
grading. 

Three times per week, one term. Credit: 1 hour. 

23. Teaching Home Economics. 

The purpose of this course is to make the application of the 
fundamental principles and general theory involved in method to 
the field of Home Economics teaching. 

Three hours per week, one term. Credit: 1 hour. 

24. Applied Dress Design. 

A survey of the individual and social conditions which have in- 
fluenced the design of costumes in different countries; a study of 
fundamental principles of composition, line, dark and light, and 
color harmony, and problems involving the use of these principles. 

Three laboratory periods per week, 18 weeks. Credit: 1% hours. 

25. Advanced Dressmaking. 

This course includes practice in draping and modeling original 
designs. Practical work developed largely in muslin and tissue 
paper. Pinal problem will be an afternoon dress. Emphasis is 
placed on clothing methods for the high school. 

Three laboratory periods per week, 18 weeks. Credit: iy 2 hours. 

31. Dietetics. 

This course deals with the requirements of the individual 
throughout infancy, childhood, adolescence, adult life and old age, 
in the light of chemistry and physiology of digestion; the energy 
value of food, the nutrition properties of proteins, fats, carbohy, 
drates, ash constituents and vitamines. Typical dietetics are planned 
for each period, and the problem of satisfying diverse requirements 
in families and other groups is considered, with special regard to 
economical and social conditions. 

Three hours per week, 18 weeks. Credit: iy 2 hours. 

32. Millinery. 

Approached from the standpoint of design. The practical prob- 
lems are developed in various materials in relation to costume and 
occasion. 

Three laboratory periods per week, 18 weeks. Credit: \y z 
hours. 

33. Advanced Cookery. 

Complex processes of cookery and Demonstration Cookery. Also 
special study of management problems in quantity cookery for tea 



48 STATE NORM AIL COLLEGE 

rooms, school and college lunch rooms, hospital dietary depart- 
ments and in other types of food service for large groups. Oppor- 
tunity for students who desire to obtain practice in giving special 
demonstration in various phases of scientific cookery. 

Two laboratory periods and one recitation, two terms. Credit: 
2 hours. 

34. Hygiene of Childhood and Adolescence. 
(Open to Senior Academic Students). 

This course presents a brief review oil heredity and prenatal in- 
fluence; consideration of eugenics; application of biologic principles 
in the care of infancy and childhood and the relation of physical 
welfare to other values in the life of a child. In includes the sig- 
nificance and value of the lengthened period of immaturity in the 
human species; adolescent development with normal and abnormal 
characteristics; and education for parenthood involving sex-hygiene 
and sex-educaation with other factors. 

Three hours per week, 2 terms. Credit: 2 hours. 

35. Survey in Household Arts. 

This course is planned for students who do not major in House- 
hold Arts. It includes units in foods, clothing, budgeting, personal 
hygiene, recreation, and family and teaching relations, with sug- 
gestions for correlation with other subjects in the curriculum. 
Opportunities for class-room observation and suggestions for ref- 
erence material will be given. 

Elective for A. B. students. 

Three hours per week, three terms. Credit: 3 hours. 

LATIN AND GREEK 



GREEK 

1. For Beginners. 

Three hours per week, 3 terms. Credit: 3 hours. H. L. Sprout. 

2. Zenophon's Anabasis. 

Three hours per week, 3 terms. Credit: 3 hours. H. L. Sprout. 

LATIN 

1. Selection From Horace and Livy, and Some Work in the History 
of Rome. 

Three hours per week, 3 terms. Credit: 3 hours. H. L. Sprout. 
11 and 12. Plautus and Terence. 

Three hours per week, 3 terms. Credit: 3 hours. H. L. Sprout. 
21, 22, and 23. Tacitus, Pliny, Selected Letters and Selections from 
Sallust. 



STATE NORMAL COLLEGE 49 

Three hours per week, 3 terms. Credit: 3 hours. H. L. Sprout. 
31 and 32. Juvenal and Lucretius, De Rerum Natura. 

Three hours per week, 3 terms. Credit: 3 hours. H. L. Sprout. 

LIBRARY SCIENCE 



This course will include a study of the classification and catalogue 
of the Normal School Library, the uses of encyclopedias, indexes 
to periodical literature and general reference books in school 
library, simple methods of accessioning, classifying and cataloguing, 
selection and buying of books. 

Three hours per week throughout the year. Junior or Senior. 
Credit: 3 hours. 

MATHEMATICS 



1. Arithmetic: Methods and Review for Elementary Teachers. 

A general review is made in which methods will be considered 
and practiced. A study of texts, their objectives, contents, time re- 
quirements, and order of subject matter studied. Topics for review 
are: The Fundamental Operations in Arithmetic, Fractions, Deci- 
mals, The Principals of Percentage with their Applications, Simple 
and Compound Interest, Partial Payments, Annuities, and Insur- 
ance. 

Three hours per week, fall and winter quarters. First year 
certificate students. Credit: 2 hours. Prerequisite: Entrance Re- 
quirements. Professors Beckwith and Caallaway. 

2. Algebra: Methods and Review for Elementary Teachers. 

A review of topics in algebra in which the methods will be 
considered and practiced. A study of texts, their contents and ob- 
jectives, and time requirements is made. The topics for review are: 
Fundamental Operations of Algebra, Factoring, Fractions, Simple 
Algebraic Equations, Graphs, Quadratic Equations, Problems. 

Two hours per week class room, two hours per week observa- 
tion. Spring quarter. First year certificate students. Credit: 1 
hour. Prerequisite: Entrance Requirements. Professors Beckwith 
and Callaway. 

3. Trigonometry. Plane. 

A study of the theory and its applicaation to numerous exer<- 
cises and problems based on the Fundamental Definitions, the 
Right Triangle, the Derivation of Formulae, Trigonometric Iden- 
tities and Equations, and the Oblique Triangle. 

Three hours per week. Fall quarter. Freshman. Credit: 1 



50 STATE NORMAL COLLEGE 

hour. Prerequisite: Entrance Requirements. Professors Beckwith 
and Callaway. 

4. Analytical Geometry. Elementary Course. 

A study of the theorems, their proofs, exercises and problems 
based on the theorems. The contents consist in: Fundamental 
Definitions, the Corordinate System, Lengths, the Straight Line, 
Locus Problems, the Circle, Polar Coordinates, Transformation of 
Coordinates, the parabola, Ellipse, Hyperbola, Tangents. 

Three hours per week. Winter and Spring Quarters. Fresh- 
man. Credit: 2 hours. Prerequisite: Math. 3. Professors Beck- 
with and Callaway. 

11. Algebra: Advanced. 

A study of Simultaneous Linear Equations, Problems, Quadratic 
Equations, Simultaneous Quadratic Equations and Problems, Ratio, 
Proportion, Variation, Elementary Theory of Equations, Horner's 
Method, Determinents, Partial Fractions, Limits, Series. 

Three hours per week. Fall and Winter Quarters. Sophomore. 
Credit: 2 hours. Prerequisite: Math. 4. Professor Callaway. 

12. Calculus: Introductory. 

An Introduction to Differential and Integral Calculus with ele- 
mentary applications to Physics and Mechanics. Topics: The 
Function Concept, The Derivative, Rates, Differentiaation, Maxima 
and Minima, Simple Integration. 

Three hours per week. Spring Quarter. Sophomore. Credit: 

1 hour. Prerequisite: Math. 11. Professor Callaway. 

21. Calculus: Differential and Integral. 

A more general study of the theories and applications of The 
Differential and Integral Calculus throughout the year. The Topics 
are: Differentiation, Rates, the second and higher order Derivatives, 
Maxima and Minima, Limits, Series, Curvature, Indefinite and Defi- 
nite Integration, Integration of Algebraic and Trigonometric Func- 
tions, of Rational Fractions, the Integral as the Limit of a Sum, 
Double and Triprle Integration, Applications, Types and Solutions of 
Simple Linear Differential Equations of the first Order and Degree. 

Three hours per week. Fall, Winter and Spring Quarters. Junior. 
Credit: 3 hours. Prerequisite: Math. 12. Professor Beckwith. 
31. Analytical Geometry: Advanced. 

Review of Conic Sections and Tangents, Space Coordinates, Dis- 
tances, the Plane, the Straight Line, Loci, Special Surfaces. 

Three hours per week. Fall Quarter. Senior. Credit: 1 hour. 
Prerequisite. Math. 12. Professor Beckwith. 



STATE NORMAL COLLEGE 51 

32. Differential Equations: Elementary. 

Types and their Solutions, Particular and Complete Solutions, 
the Primitive, Number of Arbitrary Constants in the Solution, 
Geometrical Interpretation, Equations of the first Order and De- 
gree, Equations of the first Order but not of the first Degree, Singu- 
lar Solutions, Cusp, Taac, and Node Loci, Solution by Differentia- 
tion, Clairaaut's Equation, Geometrical Applications, Equations of 
the second Order, Method of Variation of Parameters, Linear Equa- 
tions with Constant Coeficients, Symbolic Methods, Riccati's Equa- 
tion, Simultaneous Linear Differential Equations. 

Three hours per week. Winter and Spring Quarters. Senior. 
Credit: 2 hours. Prerequisite: Math. 31. Professor Beckwith. 
S3. Arithmetic: Methods and Review for High School Teachers. 

A review of the content in which the time equation and methods 
will be studied and discussed. Emphasis will be given to the 
methods of presenting difficult topics, the type and amount of 
drill work required, methods of attacking problems, methods of 
conducting supervised study, and the value and application of 
standardized tests in arithmetic. 

Two hours per week class room, two hours per week observation. 
Fall Quarter. Senior. Credit: 1 hour. Prerequisite: Math. 4. 
Professor Callaway. 

34. Algebra: Methods and Review for High School Teachers. 
The nature of this course is similar to that of 33. 

Two hours per week class room, two hours per week observation. 
Winter Quarter. Senior. Credit: 1 hour. Prerequisite: Math. 4. 
Professor Callaway. 

35. Geometry: Methods and Review for High School Teachers. 
The nature of this course is similar to that of the Arithmetic 

and Algebra. 

Two hours per week class room, two hours per week observation. 
Spring Quarter. Senior. Credit: 1 hour. Prerequisite: Math. 4. 
Professor Callaway. 

Those seniors who may be preparing to teach High School Mathe- 
matics and who may wish to make a review of such in which the 
contents and methods will be studied should elect Courses 33, 34, 
and 35 during their senior year. Written reports on the Observa- 
tion are required — these reports being made to and discussed be- 
fore the class with the author as the leader of the discussion. 

Those who may be expecting to do graduate work in Mathe- 
matics are advised to elect courses 31 and 32 during their senior 
year. 



52 STATE NORMAL COLLEGE 

PUBLIC SCHOOL MUSIC 



1. Chorus. 

Every quarter. Required of all second year students. The 
chorus affords an opportunity for experiment and practice in con- 
ducting for those desiring to specialize in public school music. One 
formaal concert is given annually by the chorus. 

2. Music for Grades I to IV Inclusive. 

Pall quarter: Note singing; sight reading; study of the major 
scale. 

Winter quarter: Sight reading; oral and written dictation; 
monotones and how to treat them. Use of Victrola in Rote songs. 

Spring quarter: Materials and methods of teaching Grades III 
and IV; interpretation and appreciation. 

Three hours per week throughout year. Freshman. Credit: 3 
hours. 
11. Music for Grades V to VII Inclusive. 

Prerequisite: Music II or advanced instrumental or vocal music. 

Fall quarter: Sigh reading; rhythmic forms; chromatic progres- 
sions. 

Winter quarter: Methods and materials. Correlation of mu6ic 
by means of the Victrola. Ear training and melody writing. 

Spring quarter: Advanced sigh reading; appreciation and in- 
terpretation. Rural school problems. 

Elective teaching may be elected during this year). 

Elective during sophomore year. Credit: 3 hours. 
31. Music for the High School. 

Every quarter: Prerequisites: Music 2 and 3 or their equiva- 
lent. This course deals with the problems relative to music in 
the high school. Organization of chorus, glee club and or- 
chestra. High School Harmony and History of Music. Practical 
work in conducting. Interpretaation and appreciation by means 
of piano and victrola. 
Piano. 

Realizing the demands for better equipped Instrumental Music 
Teachers, the State Normal School has added Special Normal Course, 
the object of which is to fit the student (at very little cost) to 
teach Instrumental Music. 

Students are not only required to be acquainted with the repre- 
sentative works of he best composers, but must study the theory of 
music, harmony, history and pedagogy, and be able to analyze and 
criticise a musical composition intelligently. 



STATE NORMAL COLLEGE 53 

The standard has been raised, the course carefully planned, and 
the department is well qualified to carry on the work. The advan- 
tages are equal to any music school in the south. 

Students are graded and classified according to their technical 
skill, and their general musical knowledge. They are required to 
bring with them a complete list of studies and pieces, that they 
may be given credit for same. 

Especial attention is given to ensemble playing. The year is 
divided into four terms, nine weeks each. Tuition payable in ad- 
vance at time dormitory fee is due. Piano practice included. Tui- 
tion when once paid will not be refunded. 

Piano, two hours each week, $12.75 per term. 

Harmony, two hours each week, $9.00 per term. 

Voice. 

The aim of the Voice Department is to set before the student the 
ideal of a pure and resonant vocal tone, and to develop the abil- 
ity to produce such a tone. 

This takes up breathing and posture exercises; simple scales and 
arpeggios varied to suit the needs of the individual student. Studies 
by Neidlinger, Sieber or equivalent and simple songs. 

As the student advances study of major and minor scales and 
arppeggios; scales leagato and staccato, in turns and triplets. Stud- 
ies by Concone, Marchesi or equivalent. Songs from American, 
English, French and other schools. Introductory work in oratorio 
and opera. 

A small fee of $18,000 for nine weeks is charged, payable in ad- 
vance. This includes use of piano for practice. 

Violin. 

Instruction in violin consists of a graded course embracing ele- 
mentary exercises and studies by Hohmann, Wolfhart, and others, 
progressing through Kayser, Books I and II, Mazas, Kreutzer, 
Schradieck Scaale Studies Rode, Fiorillo Gavinies and others, with 
pieces by classic and modern composers, according to the profFiciency 
of pupil. A candidate for diploma in violin must have studied 
Kreutzer and Rode, and some of the easier concertos and sonatos, 
have a reasonable repertoire of solos suitable for recital purposes, 
and be able to play easy accompaniments on the piano. Require- 
ments for Harmony, History of Music and Ensemble are the 6ame 
as in piano. Post graduate courses will be given on application. 



54 STATE NORMAL COLLEGE 

ORATORY 



The courses in Oratory are designed to develop the students in 
the art of expression through gesture, speech and presence, with the 
special idea of helping those who are to become teachers. 

The methods employed overcome the effects of repression, stim- 
ulate free endeavor, increase "the joy of the working" and develop 
creative power. Each student is trained to express herself in 
many ways — in story telling, in dramatic personations, in oral com- 
position, in platform reading and in literary interpretation. The 
student is taught to think and feel before an audience and to ex- 
press these thoughts and emotions through her own individuality. 

This results in a natural style, cultivates and refines literary taste, 
strengthens the imagination and develops personal power. Any 
student will find this study invaluable in teaching any other sub- 
ject, because oratory tends to bring poise, freedom from self-con- 
eciousness, a responsive voice and body, a keener imagination, emo- 
tions aroused and directed to the expression of the best of one's 
nature. The following courses are offered to those desiring special 
study in Oratory, and will be given in one private lesson and three 
class lessons per week. The work is designed to cover a period of 
two years of study. 

A certificate in Oratory will be given to students completing the 
courses as outlined below and also the following subjects: Psychol- 
ogy; History of Education; Methods; English; Junior Literature; 
Psychology; Modern Language; Common School Music; Art His- 
tory; Physical Culture. 

A fee of $8.00 per month will be charged students of this de- 
partment. 

1. Recitals and Private Lessons. 

A series of Dramatic studio-recitals in which two-year students 
appear are a culmination of the work of small recital groups, pri- 
vate lessons and weekly programs in which a variety of platform 
material is presented before the entire Oratory Department. 

Two and one-half hours weekly throughout the year. 

2. Technique. 

The aim of this course is to give students a thorough drill in 
the principles which govern VOCAL and BODILY development. 

Bodily expression and pantomine drills develop the body as a 
free responsive agent of the soul's expression. This includes a 
study of the physiology and psychology of gesture; harmony of ac- 
tion — hand exercises. 

In order to produce strong, brilliant and expressive voices, much 



STATE NORMAL COLLEGE 55 

emphasis is placed on the study of articulation, phonetics, speech 
formation, pronunciation, breath control, personance, flexibility, 
power, tone, language. 

Two hours per week throughout the year, 

11. Dramatic Technique. 

The basic principles of Dramatic Art are studied and applied in 
many excellent amateur productions, including a great variety of 
dramatic material: one-act plays for claass-room study, two mod- 
ern three-act plays and one Shakespearean production before the 
public. 

Students of this course take complete charge of each performance, 
acting, coaching, "making-up" and managing all mechanical devices 
"behind scenes," including lights, setting, properties and costumes. 

Two hours per week throughout the year. 

12. Educational Dramatics. 

A study of play production from the dramatized reading lesson 
to the finished performance with the purpose of giving students 
practical experience in directing plays for and with children. The 
material of this course provides students with good programs for 
all the special holidays observed in the common schools. 

One hour per week throughout the year. 

13. A Study of Dialects. 

One of the most interesting and appealing mediums of expression 
is dialect. In this course students study only the best selections 
from the Southern Negro, Italian, French-Canadian, Scotch, Irish, 
Dutch, Cockney, Hoosier, and the Child. 

One hour per week throughout the year. 
14. 

A limited number of Seniors are allowed to teach in this depart- 
ment each term; an equivalent of the similar experience in the 
Training School. 

5. Story-Telling. 

The most universal method of imparting knowledge and of im- 
pressing moral and spiritual truths is through story-telling. Here 
all knowledge of child psychology is applied and students become 
familiar with every type of story. A "Story Hour" is conducted by 
Oratory students every Monday. 

One hour per week throughout the year. Senior. 

6. Advanced Interpretation. 

This course! involves a study of one act plays, the short story, 
and modern poetry. Recitals are given. 

One hour per week throughout the year. Senior. 



56 STATE NORMAL COLLEGE 

PHYSICAL EDUCATION 



I. Physical Education. 

This course includes fundamentals in tactics, free exercises, cor- 
rective work, light apparatus, folk dancing and games. 

Two hours per week throughout the year. Freshman and first 
year Certificate. 

II. Physical Education. 

Continuation of work started in the previous year. Considerable 
time is given to games and dances suitable for elementary and 
grammar grades and a fund of material for teaching purposes is 
collected. 

Two hours per week throughout the year. Sophomore and sec- 
ond year Certificate. 
21. Physical Education. 

This course includes work in the theory and practice of physical 
education. A study is made of the different systems of gymnastics 
and stress placed upon special methods of teaching physical educa- 
tion. It also includes corrective work, advanced apparatus, dancing 
and games. 

Three hours per week throughout the year. Junior or Senior 
Course. Credit: 3 hours. 
Athletics. 

The work of this department includes, in addition to the regular 
gymnastics, careful instruction in outdoor games and sports. A 
well equipped athletic field is provided for the use of the students. 
A number of Field Days are given during each year, and the victo- 
rious class is awarded the possesion of a beautiful loving cup. 
Gymnasium Suit. 

The gymnasium suit adopted by the school consists of white middy 
blouse, black bloomers and black tennis slippers. These articles 
are part of the school uniform and must be purchased after reach- 
ing Athens. 

PUBLIC SPEAKING 



1C. Public Speaking. Certificate Course. 

The work in this course will consist in methods for Primary and 
Grammar grades, and will include lectures, discussions, and prac- 
tical illustrative exercises. Some of the phases of reading studied 
are: the relation of reading to other studies in the curriculum; 
methods of getting good reading; enunciation and pronunciation; 
phonics; pitch, inflection, modulation, model work; the development 



STATE NORMAL COLLEGE 57 

lesson; conduct of the reading lesson; emphasis of the importance 
of good oral reading on the part of the teacher. 

Three hours per week, one quarter. Credit: 1 hour. 
21. Public Speaking. Degree Course. 

The work in this course will consist in whatever pertains to pre- 
paring and delivering one's own speeches. Interpretation of great 
speeches, to train practical public speakers. A comprehensive study 
in principles, using masterpieces of oratory, and illustrative matter 
from current affairs, politics, reforms, advertisement, and any other 
subjects of interest. Impromptu and prepared speeches. Each 
student must select a majort topic on which he will write several 
speeches. Each student will be required to prepare and deliver 
lectures on specified teaching problems or subjects. 

Three hours per week throughout the year. Credit: 3 hours. 

ROMANCE LANGUAGES 



1. French. 

Optional with Latin and Spanish for State Normal School diplo- 
ma. A course for beginners which consists of careful drill in pro- 
nunciation, translation, conversation, dictation and the reading of 
easy French texts. No prerequisite. 

Three hours epr week throughout the year. Freshman and First 
year Diploma. Credit: 3 hours. 

2. French. 

Optional with Latin and Spanish for State Normal School diploma. 
Prerequisite: French 1 or its equivalent. This course is a continua- 
tion of French 1. It consists of a thorough review of grammar and 
syntax, constant practice in translating English into French, con- 
versation and extensive reading. 

Three hours per week throughout the year. Sophomore and Sec- 
ond year Diploma. Credit: 3 hours. 

3. French. 

Optional to students who have had French 2 or its equivalent. 
This course consists of advanced work in French. Extensive read- 
ing in and out of the class room. Explanation of texts. Rhetoric, 
composition and essays in French. Conversation, lectures in French 
on literary topics. 

Three hours per week throughout the year. Junior. Credit: 3 
hours. 

4. French. 

Prerequisite: French 3 or its equivalent. This is especially a 



58 STATE NORMAL COLLEGE 

course of practice in teaching and is open to students who have 
had the three courses as outlined above, or their equivalent. Of 
the three hours scheduled, two will be given to practice in teaching 
and the other to lectures in, French by the Professor. Besides, ex- 
tensive outside reading and reports in French on the books read 
will be required. 

French 3 and French 4 will be required for a Baccalaureate de- 
gree of the State Normal School, if French is elected. 

Three hours per week. Senior. Credit: 3 hours. 

1. Spanish. 

Optional with Latin and French for State Normal School diploma. 
A course for beginners which consists of careful drill in pronun- 
ciation, translation, conversation, dictation and the reading of easy 
Spanish texts. No prerequisite. 

Three hours per week throughout the year. Freshman and First 
year Diploma. Credit: 3 hours. 

2. Spanish. 

Optional with Latin and French for State Normal School diploma. 
Prerequisite: Spanish 1 or its equivalent. This course is a con- 
tinuation of Spanish 1. It consists of a thorough review of gram- 
mar and syntax, constant practice in translation English into Span- 
ish, conversation and extensive reading. 

Three hours per week throughout the year. Sophomore and 
Second year Diploma. Credit: 3 hours. 

3. Spanish. 

Optional to students who have had Spanish 2 or its equivalent. 
This course consists of advanced work in Spanish. Extensive read- 
ing in and out of the class room. Explanation of texts. Rhetoric, 
compositions and essays in Spanish. Conversation, lectures in 
Spanish on literary topics. 

Three hours per week throughout the year. Junior. Credit: 
3 hours. 

4. (Spanish. 

Prerequisite: Spanish 3 or its equivalent. This is especially a 
course of practice in teaching and is open only to students who have 
had the three courses as outlined above, or their equivalent. Of 
the three hours scheduled, two will be given to practice in teaching 
and the other lectures in Spanish by the Professor. Besides, ex- 
tensive outside reading and reports in Spanish on the books read 
will be required. 

Spanish 3 and Spanish 4 will be required for a Baccalaureate de- 
gree of the State Normal School, if Spanish is elected. 



STATE NORMAL COLLEGE 59 

Three hours per week throughout the year. Senior. Credit: 
3 hours. 

SCIENCE 

I. Inorganic Chemistry. 

A study of the Elements and Compounds especially of industrial 
nature and application. Chemical theory and calculations, prob- 
lems and processes. How chemical force combines elements into 
compounds and how these are made serviceable to man. How 
progress is dependent upon chemical advancement; and, conserves 
the best interests of the race. 

Two recitation periods, one laboratory period per week through- 
out the year. Freshman. Credit: 3 hours. Fee, $3.00. 

II. Physics. 

A study of Force and Energy and their relation to Matter; how 
they are applied to present day civilization, Sound; Light; Heat; 
Magnetism; Electricity and Applications to use. Laboratory of in- 
teresting and instructive nature. 

Three hours per week throughout the year. Sophomore. Credit: 
3 hours. Fee, $3.00. 

21. Biology. 

A study of living forms and functions, plant and animal; relation 
to environment. Full laboratory work. 

Three hours per week throughout the year. Fee, $3.00. 

22. Organic Chemistry. 

A systematic study of the classification and relation of the carbon 
compounds; a study of the digestion, metabolism and chemical com- 
position of foods. A brief outline of the course includes; hydro- 
carbons, as related to household processes; acids as related to the 
study of fats, vinegar, fruits and vegetables esters as used for flav- 
oring; fats as to occurrence, composition and recations. Emphasis 
is constantly placed on the practical and professional side of study. 
Prerequisite: Inorganic Chemistry; Food Study and Cookery 1. 

Two recitation periods, one (laboratory period per week through- 
ou the year. Junior. Credit: 3 hours. Fee, $3.00. 
2C. Georgraphy. 

A study of forms and forces; Dynamical Geology; our place in 
the Solar System. A preparation for the proper teaching of Geog- 
raphy, the Earth as the home of man. Nature study. 

Three hours per week throughout the year. Senior. Credit: 
3 hours. 



60 STATE NORMAL COLLEGE 

32. Physiciological Chemistry. 

This course presents the essential chemical facts pertaining to hu- 
man nutrition including chemical constituents of cells, chemistry of 
foods, digestion absorption, assimilation, tissue composition, excre- 
tion. The laboratory work includes experiments on fermentation; 
respiration; salivary, gastric, pancreatic and intestinal digestion in 
relation to life processes. Prerequisites: Inorganic and Organic 
Chemistry. 

Two laboratory periods and one recitation period per week, 18 
weeks. Senior. Credit: 1% hours. Fee, |3.00. 

33. Microbiology. 

This course deals with bacteria, yeasts and molds and other 
micro-organisms which affect home and community life. 

Two hours lecture and two laboratory; 18 weeks. Credit: 2 
hours. (Senior. Fee, $3.00. 

34. Textile 'Chemistry. 

This course considers the identification of fibers and substitute 
material by means of the microscope; the chemical examination of 
fibers including tests to determine content of cloth and adultera- 
tion, and proper use of materials in relation to cleansing and 
laundering; lectures, and laboratory experiment in dyeing. Pre- 
requisite: Inorganic Chemistry. 

One recitation and two laboratory periods per week, 18 weeks. 
Senior. Credit: 1*£ hours. 

CARNEGIE LIBRARY 



This building, as indicated by its name, was the gift of Mr. 
Andrew Carnegie. It is well equipped with Library Bureau furni- 
ture and contains about ten thousand volumes with something like 
three thousand pamphlets. The faculty and registered students of 
the school have free access to the library and may draw books for 
home reading. To the general public it is for reference only. 

The Reading Room' is of infinite value to the students both for 
general reading and reference work. The following magazines are 
on file: American Cookery, American Journal of Education, Ameri- 
can Magazine, American School Board Journal, Atlantic Monthly, 
Bookman, Century, Country Life, Current History, New York Times, 
Current Oponion, Delineator, Education, Educational Review, Ele- 
mentary School Journal, Good Housekeeping, Independent, Indus- 
trial Arts Magazine, Journal of Education, Journal of Home Eco- 
nomics, Journal of Psychology, Kindergarten and First Grade, 
Ladies' Home Journal, Literary Digest, Manual Training Magazine, 



STATE NORMAL COLLEGE 61 

Missionary Review, Musical America, Nation, National Geographic, 
Nature Study Review, New Republic, North American Review, Nor- 
mal Instructor, Outlook, Playground, Progressive Farmer, Reader's 
Guide to Periodical Literature, Review of Reviews, Saturday Even- 
ing Post, School Arts Magazine, School Century, School and Home 
Education, School and Society, School Review, 'Survey Teachers' 
College Record, Textile World, Travel, Woman's Home Companion, 
Worlds' Work, Yale Review, Harper's Monthly, Mentor, Hibbert 
Journal, American City, Woman Citizen. These magazines are 
bound at the end of each school year and prove a most valuable 
aid in the Reference Department. 

The library is open daily (except Sunday) from 8:45 A. M. until 
5:30 P. M., closing for the dinner hour. Books other than "Re- 
serves" may be borrowed fro mthe library for two weeks. Re- 
served books are issued overnight only. 

It is the main purpose of the library to both create and stimulate 
a taste for good literature as well as serve the various departments 
in their reference work. It is our ambition to give every student 
of every department a working knowledge of the institution and 
thereby double its value to the student body. 

CORRESPONDENCE STUDY 



General Information. 

The State Normal School offers correspondence to those whose 
duties make it impossible for them to pursue in residence. These 
courses are designed for those who are interested in professional 
growth, desire guidance or wish to supplement their training. 
These courses are prepared by the regular members of the Faculty 
and are given dn the class rooms of the several departments during 
the regular session. 

Nature of the Work. 

Each course shall consist of as many lessons as the instructor 
may require. Each quarter course shall approximate a minimum 
og 150 hours work. Each lesson shall consist of assignments from 
texts, supplementary reading, questions to test the method of the 
work, and the results obtained. 
Credit. 

For each course with the equivalent of a quarter's work, the 
State Normal School allows 1 hour credit. This credit may apply 
towards a diploma or a degree. 

No fractional course can be offered for credit. The full course 
must be taken if credit is to be obtained. 



62 STATE NORMAL COLLEGE 

Admission Requirements. 

The State Normal School wishes to be reasonably sure that a 
student can succeed in the course he desires to take, and it re- 
serves the right to examine his application carefully and nefore en- 
rollment, to recommend other courses than those selected, or reject 
the application if the statements on his blanks justify such action. 
If the student is not accepted or if he does n ot wish to change from 
his original choice, his fee will be refunded. 

A student wishing to enroll must not be in attendance in any 
other institution, or in residence at S. N. C-, and must satisfy the 
entrance requirements of the State Normal School. 

Courses. 

No student will be allowed to enroll in more than two courses at 
the same time. It is advised that all of the time be concentrated 
on one course. A student is expected to finish the course by end of 
scholastic year. A minimum of one semester is allowed a student 
to finish a course provided he distributes his work evenly. 

Before a student enrolls for a course he must fulfill all the pre- 
requisites required by the instructor. 

The methods of instruction serves to keep the student and teach- 
er in close contact with the work of the course. After preparing 
the lesson the student writes his answers and mails his paper to 
the instructor together with any questions concerning such diffi- 
culties as may have arisen during the study. The instructor cor- 
rects and comments on the paper and returns is to the student. In 
like manner the work goes on until the course is completed. No 
incomplete course will be given credit. 

Examinations on each course will be given either at the State 
Normal School or under supervision satisfactory to the State Nor- 
mal School. . No credit is given unless an examination is taken. 

If on account of interruptions or delays the course is deferred, a 
fee of ($3.00) three dollars will be charged for extension of time. 

No course is given during summer vacation, except by instructor 
permission. 

Credit Value Toward a Diploma or Degree. 

No work in Second year diploma or Senior class will be given by 
correspondence. In cases of emergency, classes begun, with 
permission of faculty, may be completed by correspondence. 

Records of correspondence grades shall be kept as such and so 
indicated when transferred to other institutions. 

No student may take more tha none-third of the work required 
for a diploma or a degree. 



STATE NORMAL COLLEGE 63 

The State Normal School does not grant a diploma or a degree 
for correspondence study work alone. 



All fees are payable in advance and they should accompany the 
application for instruction. The matriculation fee is $10 and is 
required of all students at the time of their first registration. The 
tuition fee for each quarter course is eight dollars ($8.00). The 
tuition fee includes payment for instruction sent for return of 
lesson papers. 

No fees will be returned after the work has begun. 
Enroll. 

Application blanks will be sent on request. 

A student may begin a course for which he has been accepted at 
any time which will allow the work to be completed by end of 
scholastic year. It is advised that application be made in September 
and February. 

Fill out the application blank, enclose a money order made pay- 
able to President Jere M. Pound, and address to President Jere M. 
Pound, State Normal School, Athens, Ga. 

CORRESPONDENCE COURSES 
Education 

General Psychology; History of Education; Tests and Measure- 
ments; Educational Psychology; Principles of Elementary Educa- 
tion; Principles of Secondary Education. 

English 
Shakespeare, Comedies, Tragedies; 19th Century Novel; American 
Literature; The Teaching of Literature. 

History 
Political Science; American Government; Political Parties; Mod- 
ern European; American; Advanced European. 

Mathematics 
Trigonometry; Analytical Geometry; Calculus; College Algebra. 

Latin 
Prose Composition; Roman Literature. 
Social Sciences 
Economic Geography; Rural Social Problems. 

Music 
Harmony, Theory, Miss Wedge; History of Music. 

Physical Education 
Play and Community Recreation. 



64 STATE NORMAL, COLLEGE 

Art 

Elementary Drawing and Painting. 

French 

French Composition; Masterpieces of French Literature. 

Spanish 

(Spanish Composition; Introduction to Spanish Literature. 

Sociology 

Principles of Sociology; Modern Social Problems. 

Health 

Hygiene and Education. 

For the benefit of mature students who find it impossible to 
finish their High School education »in residence, the State Normal 
Academy is offering certain courses for Correspondence study. 
These courses are offered under the same conditions and regulations 
as prescribed for the College Courses. 
Courses offered: 

English — Eighth year. 

English — Ninth year. 

English — Tenth year. 

English — Tenth year. 

Algebra — Ninth year (% year algebra-prequisite.) 

Early European History. 

Modern European History. 

American History. 

Solid Geometry — y 2 credit. 

Advanced Algebra — % credit. 

Unless otherwise indicated each course gives credit for one High 
School unit. 

LECTURE COURSES 



The school maintains a Lyceum Course which is free to all the 
students of the school and in which are engaged the best platform 
performers we can procure. In addition to this, a series of lectures 
by prominent men and women in the state, who have accomplished 
things in the special ine of work in which each is interested, is kept 
up throughout the year. 

Moreover, Athens affords the school wonderful opportunity for 
seeing and hearing those who have attained distinction along many 
lines of endeavor. The school, in fact, is at times embarrassed with 
the richness of its opportunities of this kind. From time to time 
such men as Dr. Campbell Morgan, Mr. George Foster Peabody and 
others of national reputation speak in the auditorium. But they 



STATE NORMAL COLLEGE 65 

are invaluable aids in giving finishing touches to the education 
which the school is striving to impart to its student body. 

MOTION PICTURES 



Motion pictures are frequently used by the various teachers to 
supplement their class-room instruction. This method of teaching 
has proven to be both interesting and instructive. 

The moving picture machine is also used by lecturers who visit 
the school and at such times when the students are not otherwise 
engaged some of the best popular films are shown. 

STUDENT ORGANIZATIONS 



1. The Young Women's Christian Association. 

The Young Women's Christian Association, through its social life, 
Vesper services, Morning Watch, Bible study, mission study, church 
attendance and intercollegiate relationships, seeks to promote the 
spirit of Christian thinking and Christian living among students 
and to train them for Christian life and work. 

The Social Work consists in aiding new students to harmonious 
adjustment to the school life and its activities, with continuous 
efforts for daily serivce in sundry ways. 

The Course in World Fellowship is carefully planned and the 
text books used are the newest and best, treating both home and 
foreign mission problems. 

Intercollegiate relationships have been established by delegations 
to the Georgia Students Volunteer Union, the Southern Conference 
of the Young Women's Christian Association, by visits of traveling 
student secretaries, delegates to the Student Volunteer Convention, 
Cabinet training councils, visiting Secretaries of the churches and 
W. C. T. U., and by the interchange of reports and methods with 
other associations. 

Church attendance is emphasized in-order that the students may 
derive all the spiritual benefits possible from the excellent church 
facilities of Athens, and to factor the habit of church attendance. 

2. Bible Study. 

The purpose of this course is to give such a general knowledge 
of the Bible as will furnish to the students a background for future 
work in detail. 

The lessons are arranged for systematic daily readings through 
the Bible, beginning with Genesis. Weekly .lessons are held on 
these readings, bringing out such points about the great Book as 
every person ought to know. 



66 STATE NORMAL COLLEGE 

The aim of the teachers in presenting these lessons is to bring 
the students into loving acquaintance with God's Word. 

The course is entirely optional, but all students are encouraged 
to join one of these classes, and due recognition is given their work 
in the permanent records of the school. 

The Bible classes are taught by members of the Faculty. 

The State Normal School won second honor in this work in the 
United States at the Panama Exposition Young Women's Christian 
Association National Contest in 1915. 

There was interest in memorizing Scripture prescribed by Helen 
Gould Shepherd, for which she presented 'Student's Bibles. The 
school has won 246 of these Bibles. This was discontinued in 1921. 

Since 1922 Mrs. Gertrude Alexander has been giving the Campbell 
Morgan edition of the Bible. Bringing our number to 262. 

Students are urged to keep in their respective classes in Bible 
work as in other studies. 

The State Normal School won first honor in the United States on 
the Student Association Honor Roll at the Panama Exposition for 
the largest average in proportion to total enrollment in Mission 
Study and Social Welfare classes in 1915. The School won second 
honor places in the two subjects that follow: volunteer Bible Study 
classes and attendance on religious services. 

3. The Woman's Christian Temperance Union. 

In connection with the Young Women's Christian Association 
work of the school, there is an organized Woman's Christian Tem- 
perance Union which holds regular meetings once per month and 
endeavors to further the study and interest in the Temperance 
Cause. 

4. The Student Volunteer Movement. 

This group of the Y. W. C. A. is composed of the individual stu- 
dents who have consecrated their lives to service in the foreign 
fields for the purpose of taking the Gospel of Christ "into all the 
world." 

5. Altioria Literary Society. 

At one time there was only one society in the State Normal 
School. On account of the overwhelming number of members it 
was advised that two societies be formed. In 1905 the two literary 
societies, under their new names, Mildred Rutherford and Alitoria, 
began their work anew. Professor Earnest gave use our name 
"Altioria," meaning higher and better. Since the date of our birth, 
under the aim and excellent prevailing spirit of our motto, "Ex- 
celsior," we have been growing each year, striving for the supernal 
and superior things in our school life. The aim of the Altioria So- 



STATE NORMAL COLLEGE 67 

ciety is the advancement of scholarship by enjoying together the 
best to be found in literature and the development of "Ideal Woman- 
hood" through faithfulness and usefulness to our school and to 
our fellows. 

6. The Mildred Rutherford Literary Society. 

The aim of this society is to develop the 'literary phase of the 
studen life through the creation of an interest in and appreciation 
for literature, music and art. The betterment of the social life of 
the school is the result of the activities of this organization and it 
is in this connection that some of the cloest friendships are formed 
which exist not only while in attendance here but the influence of 
which will be felt into the future. 

An example of the highest type of womanhood is set before the 
girls in the sponsor of the organization, Miss Mildred Rutherford, 
whose fine and noble character and the ideals for which she stands 
are ever a beacon light to those who know her. 

7. L'Alliance Fraicaise. 

One of the distinctive features of the French course is the oppor- 
tunity of the students to affiliate with the L'Alliance Francaise, an 
organization composed of those familiar with and interested in the 
French language both in this school and the other educational dn- 
stitutions of the city. Meetings are held once a month, at which 
time prominent French scholars address the organizations on some 
topic of general interest. This organization has been a means of 
creating a greater interest in and a wider knowledge for the French 
language. 

The Honorary President of the L'Alliance Francaise (Athens 
group) is Chancellor D. C. Barrow of the University, and the Presi- 
dent, Professor J. Lustrat, head of the department of Romance 
Languages at the University and at the Normal School. 

8. Glee Club. 

The purpose of this organization is recreative choral work as well 
as to afford an opportunity for the study of classical compositions. 
Membership is open to any member of the student body. The or- 
ganization gives two concerts annually and assists at other functions 
of the school. 

9. County Clubs. 

Nearly every county in Georgia is represented at the State Normal. 
Many of these counties have enough students to organize and there 
are more than twenty county clubs. There are a number of benefits 
to be derived from these clubs. Among the most important are — a 
definite way to study home county and home conditions; a united 



68 STATE NORMAL COLLEGE 

band to aid in the development of county affairs; a splendid way for 
those from home to get together; a medium to interest other stu- 
dents in the school; a course of great pleasure and leisure. These 
clubs are doing splendid, constructive work. More counties are to 
be organized and it is the aim of all of them to keep up the supply 
of members from year to year and to be of real service to the 
people at home. 

10. The Round Table. 

The Round Table is a gathering of all students who desire to 
attend at a regular meeting every Saturday night just when supper 
is over. The organization is nine years old and its aim is to fur- 
nish wholesome recreation and to develop a love for and a power to 
tell the best stories to be found in our literature. Current topics 
are discussed, songs rendered and some pleasing story told and 
commented on. This organization started with but six members 
at its inception, and now has increased in size until there is no 
room on the school campus that will hold the attendance without 
crowding. 

11. Athletic Association. 

The Athletic Association is an organization of the students to 
promote and encourage outdoor sports and athletics and is under 
the direct supervision of the Department of Physical Education. 

The Association has a well-equipped athletic field, with courts 
for tennis, basketball, volley ball and other games. Field Days and 
various athletic contests stimulate interest in outdoor activities and 
provide sane, wholesome recreation. 

12. Alumni-ae Association. 

The Alumni-ae Association of the State Normal School is an or- 
ganization concerned with the welfare of the school and its alum- 
ni-ae, and with the professional advancement of education. It is the 
channel through which the school and its alumni-ae can be of 
mutual help to each other. Its purpose is to provide a scholarship 
fund, to promote loyalty to the school, and to disseminate the ideals 
for which the school stands. 

All graduates of the school are active members of the Association 
and all persons, who have at any time been students of the school, 
are associate members. 

The officers of the Association are as follows: President, Kate E. 
Hicks; Secretary, Iris Callaway; Treasurer, Mrs. H. C. Doolittle. 

13. Reflex. 

The Reflex is the student paper. It is issued in newspaper style. 
It is printed twice a month. All general school news; society 



STATE NORMAL COLLEGE 69 

dots; editorials; literary society pages; Y. W. C. A. notes and jokes 
from the basis of its development. The editors are elected from 
the student body. They do all the writing for the paper under the 
supervision of a faculty member. 
14. Crystal. 

The Crystal is the Senior Annual. Every Senior class publishes a 
Crystal. The book appears at the end of the year. It is a memory 
book in printed form. The editors are elected from the Senior 
class. 
14. Quadrangle. 

The Quadrangle is an organization of students for the purpose 
of promoting and encouraging mental, moral, physical and social 
development. This organization is open to the entire student body 
who have had a certain period of residence and who have attained 
a required standard in mental, moral, physical and social activities. 

STATISTICS FOR 1926-27 

Registered students to date (February 21, 1927), 608; students 
registered during Summer School, 479; pupils in Academy, Mus- 
cogee Elementary and Country School, 241; total, 1,328. 

Teachers and officers, 61; counties represented by the students, 
124; students holding diplomas from other school, 554; students 
holding license to teach, 65; fifty per cent of all our students are 
the sons and daughters of farmers. 

The total registration since the foundation of the school, 17,138; 
more than 90 per cent of whom have since taught in our common 
schools. Total graduates to June, 1926, 2,835. Graduating class 
this year numbers 294. 

Buildings: Academic buildings, 4; Dormitory buildings, 4; Dining 
Hall and Senior Hall building, 1; Rural School, 1; Carnegie Li- 
brary, 1; Infirmary, 1; Practice Home, 1; Dairy Barn, 1; Stock 
Barn, 1; Total, 15. 



70 



STATE NORMAL COLLEGE 

ROLL OF STUDENTS 1926-27 



M 



Senior Class 
Name County Name County 

Christopher, Ida Mae _ _ Macon Matthews, Wilma Troup 

Culpepper, Florence V. Quattlebaum, Fay _ __ Barrow 

Meriwether Reynolds> Edna Richmond 

Davis, Lois Vivian _ _ Muscogee _, , . _,_,. , 

_, _ ., Shearouse, Annis Effimgham 

Dunstan, Grace _ _ _ _ Brazil 

Griffin, Katherine Decatur Sible y« Rachel Meriwether 

Harris, Lynda Bell Terrell Smith, Dorothy Dodge 

Hubbard, Bertha Elizabeth _ Smith, Jessie R. _ _ _ Jefferson 

___ Franklin Smith, Ruby Clarke 

Kinney, B. C._ _ _ _ _ Lincoln Tribble, Louise _ _ _ _ Gordon 

Lewis, Mildred _ _ _ _ Bullock Weaver, Eloise _____ Taylor 

McRea, Lillie Ellen _ _ Fulton Willson, Sara Louise Newton 

Junior Class 

Culpepper, Margaret _ _ _ _ Stewart, Naomi _ _ _ _ Terrell 

Meriwether Thornton, Mary Pope _ _ Elbert 

Deane, Lola Dorothy _ Stephens yieth Rebecca _ ~ outh Carolina 
Denard, Mattie B. _ _ _ Wilkes 

Fields, Janie L Turner Wall * ce - In * z D *Kalb 

Isbell, Virginia _ _ _ Stephens Wooldridge, Mary Love 

Sims, Anne Elizabeth. _ Clarke _________ Muscogee 

Sophomore Class 

Brown, Mary Jewell _ _ Clarke Guill, Florence _ _ _ Hancock' 

Brown, Lutie _ _ _ So. Carolina Joiner, Alma _____ Laurens 

Castleberry, Ruby _ _ Lumpkin Priekett, Esther _ _ _ Jackson 

Collins, Elizabeth _ _ _ Schley Smith, Jo Thetis _ - - Talbot 

Culpepper, Eleanor_Meriwether Wade, Minnie _____ Brooks 

Davis, Anna Louise Fulton Wilson, Mabel _ _ _ _ Laurens 

Gresham, Pauline _ _ _ Morgan Wright, Amy _____ Laurens 

Freshman Class 

Adams, Flora _ Clarke Babb, Lottie ______ Hall 

Aiken, Dorothy _ _ _ _Jackson Bailey, Catherine _ _ _ Walker 

Adamson, Alma _ _ _ _ Troup Barlow, Pauline _ _ _ _ Telfair 

Akins, Eunice _ _ _ Taliaferro Barnett, Ruth _____ Milton 

Alexander, Everleila _ Jefferson Barrett, Beatrice _ _ _ Gordon 

Allen, Virginia _____ Bibb Bass, Helen _____ Muscogee 

Ayers, Mildred _____ Troup Beaty, Frances _____ Troup 



STATE NORMAL COLLEGE 



71 



Name County 

Biggers, Elizabeth _ _ Muscogee 
Bolton, Kathleen _ _ _ _ Elbert 
Boykin, Daisy _____ Screven 

Bryant, Mary Alice - Clarke 

Bush, Dorothy _ 1 _ _ _ Lamar 
Byrd, Cora Belle _ _ Taliaferro 
Caldwell, Florice _ _ _ Newton 
Callaway, Sara _ _ _ _ Clarke 
Cain, Bernice _____ Glynn 
Carson, Ora Lee _ _ _ _ Oconee 

Carson, Sara - Habersham 

Carter, Christine _ _ _ _Talbot 
Carter, Gladys _ _ _ _ Morgan 
Chapman, Elizabeth _ _ Stewart 
Chandler, Marian _ _ _ Banks 
Childs, Margaret _ _ _ Monroe 
Clark, Willie _ _ _ Meriwether 
Coleman, Lois _ _ _ _ Toombs 
Cook, Bertha _____ Coweta 
Cromartie, Victoria _ _ Toombs 
Custer, Elanor _ _ _ _ Decatur 
David, Eliza _____ Madison 
Davis, Faith _____ Franklin 
Dillard, Julia _____ Clarke 

Donaldson, Louise Laurens 

Dotson, Emma _ _ _ Chatham 
Drake, Sarah _____ Clarke 
Ellis, Geraldine _ _ _ _ Milton 
Farmer, Jewell _ _ _ _ Pickens 
Forbes, Elizabeth _ _ Mcintosh 
Felder, Winifred _ _ _ _ Early 
Fitts, Chloe _____ Pickens 

Fifield, Zerline _ Lamar 

Floyd, Edith Floyd 

Flournoy, Elizabeth _ _ Carroll 
Flynt, Martha _ _ _ Taliaferro 
Forrest, Mary _ _ _ _ Sumter 
Foster, Julia F. _ _ _ _ Fulton 
Franklin, Dorothy _ _ _ Florida 
Frost, Irma _____ Chatham 

Ginn, Lois - - - - Franklin 

Glisson, Louise _____ Crisp 



Name County 

Grant, Evelyn _ _ _ _ Greene 
Grier, Willie _ _ _ Effingham 
Griner, Hazel _____ Bryan 
Gurley, Grovie _ _ _ _ Jackson 

Harvey, Mary L. Cobb 

Hale, Frances _____ Banks 

Hall, Mary ______ Gordon 

Hamiel, Frances _ _ _ Decatur 
Hannah, Eunice _ _ _ Walton 

Harris, Marjorie Jefferson 

Hopkins, Martha Habersham 

House, Louise _ _ _ _ Houston 
Hubbard, Ruby Louise_Franklin 
Hickman, Vernice _ _ Chatham 
Hudson, Frances _ _ Muscogee 
Isdal, Kittye _ _ _ _ Chatham 
Jenkins, Trudie Lee _ Madison 
Jones, Frances _ _ _ Randolph 

Jones, Frances Randolph 

Jones, Lina _____ Franklin 

Kelly, Annie L. Franklin 

Lawrence, Claire _ _ _ Clarke 
Lord, Mozelle _____ Clarke 
Loveless, Carmen _ _ Gwinnett 
Lovett, Elma _ _ _ _ Campbell 
McConnell, Rea _ _ _ Franklin 
McCoy, Hazel _____ Clarke 

McDonell, Catherine Camden 

McDonald, Florence _ _ Newton 
McDonald, Nannette _ Jackson 
McGarvey, Mary _ _ _ _ Glynn 
McGuire, Frances _ _ _ Oconee 
Morris, Mary _____ Lamar 
Mann, Lydia _____ Coweta 
Manry, Merille _ _ _ _ Calhoun 
Matthews, Louise _ _ _ Bartow 
Matthews, Margaret _ _ _ Bibb 

Meadow, Lucy A. Madison 

Merritt, Lucile _ _ _ Gwinnett 
Mize, Jessie J. _ _ _ _ Jackson 

Nash, Sa Nell Oglethorpe 

Newton, Annie _ _ _ _ Jenkins 



72 



STATE NORMAL COLLEGE 



Name County 

Nunnally, Louise _ _ _ Walton 

Orr, Elizabeth Gordon 

Patterson, Lois Jefferson 

Paxson, Eugenia _ - _ - Wilcox 
Peebles, Lois _____ Wilcox 

Petire, Ruby ______ Cobb 

Petty, Dorothy _ _ _ Gwinnett 
Phillips, Laura _ _ _ Chatham 
Phillips, Robbie _ _ _ _ Gordon 

Price, Mildred _ _ _ _ Clarke 

Puckett, Angie _ _ Wayne 

Ray, Etta _______ Greene 

Ray, Kathleen _ _ _ _ Wilkes 

Rodgers, Annie R. _ _ Muscogee 
Rogers, Thelma _ _ _ Calhoun 
Sanders, Mary _ _ _ _ Jackson 

Satterfield, Chanie _ Tennessee 
Scales, Beulah _____ Banks 

Shelton, Frances Warren 

Sipple, Mary Frances. Chatham 
'Smith, Juanita _ _ _ _ Talbot 

Smith, Margaret Webster 

Smith, Osa B. _ _ _ _ Madison 
Smith, Ruth _____ Houston 
Swindle, Lera _ _ _ _ Madison 



Name County 

Taylor, Annie _ _ _ _ _Dooly 
Thacker, Cora _ _ _ _ Pickens 
Thomas, Frances _ _ _ Clarke 
Thomason, Lucile - - _ Bartow 

Todd, Reta _ • Toombs 

Turner, Annie L. _ _ _ Newton 
Walker, Amelia _ _ _ Chatham 
Waller, Frances _ _ _ Hancock 
Warnock, Mona _ _ _ _ DeKalb 
Wells, Martha _ _ _ _ Webster 
Whitehead, Edith _ _ _ Oconee 
Whitehurst, Emily _ _ Laurens 
Whitman, Arthur M. _ Barrow 
Williams, Gladys _ _ _ _ Clay 
Williams, Geneva _ _ _ Clarke 

Williams, Hettie Mitchell 

Williams, Rubby _ _ _ Franklin 
Williams, Rosebud _ _ Gwinnett 
Williamson, Lillian _ _ _ Crisp 
Wise, Mary Agnes _ _ _ Coweta 
Wortham, Bessie Mae _ Coweta 
Yarbrough, Maude _ _ _ Cobb 
Yates, Helen ______ Bibb 

Yates, Mary _ _ Muscogee 



Yates, Sylvia Catoosa 

<7> 



Abercrombie, Gussie 

Abercrombie, Reba Clarke 

Adams, Jewell Rebecca _ Hart 
Alexander, Carrie Mae_Tattnall 
Alexander, Evelyn _ _ Jackson 
Allgood, Annie MaejSto. Carolina 
Anderson, Estelle _ _ Richmond 
Ashe, Vera ______ Walton 

Bacon, Ruby _ _ _ _ Tattnall 

Bagwell, Anita _ _ _ _ Fulton 

Bailey, Sarah _____ Coweta 

Barrow, Choyce _ _ _ _ Taylor 

Bateman, Mattie Belle _ Wash. 
Baxter, Alma _ _ _ _ Brantley 

Beale, Gertrude Richmond 



SENIOR DIPLOMA CLASS ^ %\ 

_ Clarke Belcher, Frances _ _ _ Sumter 

Bentley, Ethel Muscogee 

Bentley, Sue Beck _ _ Lincoln 
Berry, Elizabeth _ _ _ _ Lamar 
Bigelow, Julia _____ Terrell 
Blackwell, Annie _ So. Carolina 
Bloodworth, Louise _ _ Baldwin 
Bobbitt, Mabel _ _. _ _ Toombs 
Borom, Eva _____ Randolph 
Bowden, Elizabeth _ _ _ Clarke 
Bowden, Margaret _ _ Muscogee 
Bowen, Eva Mae _ _ _ Bullock 
Boynton, Margaret _ _ Mitchell 
Brackett, Delia Lee _ _ Clarke 

1* 



STATE NORMAL COLLEGE 



73 



Name County 

Bradberry, Bertha Desma - - 

Barrow 

Brooks, Jimmie Lee - Campbell 
Brooks, Louise _ _ _ _ Fulton 
Bryan, Dexter _____ Hart 
Buck, Elizabeth _ _ _ Muscogee 
Burch, Celestia _ _ _ Laurens 
Callaway, Helen _ _ _ _ Wilkes 

Campbell, Mildred Bibb 

Carlisle, Frances _ _ _ Clarke 
Carpenter, Myrtle _ _ _ Elbert 
Chandler, Martha - - - Oconee 
Chandler, Molene _ _ _ Madison 
Clark, Lucy _ _ _ Meriwether 
Cofer, Marguerite _ _ _ Wilkes 
Colquitt, Antionette _ _ Upson 
Cordell, Vera ______ Hart 

Cowan, Louise _ Rockdale 

Crouch, Evelyn _ _ Meriwether 
Cowart, Susie Mae _ _ Calhoun 
Cubbedge, Mary Lillian _ _ _ 
_________ Effingham 

Daniel, Evelyn Jackson 

Darden, Evelyn Troup 

Deal, Alma Habersham 

Dennis, Margaret _ _ _ Greene 
Dent, Charlotte _____ Hall 
Dodd, Lillian _ _ _ -Habersham 
Drewry, Lillian _____ Pike 
Dunahoo, Alice _ _ _ _ Barrow 
Easterling, Lola _ _ _ Tattnall 

Eaves, Kathleen _ Haralson 

Eaves, Willie Lou _ _ _ Elbert 
Edwards, Jessie Mae _ Houston 
Einstein, Christine _ _ Mitchell 
Everett, Mary Frances _ Blekley 
Fanning, Julia_ _ _ _ McDuffie 
Fargason, Marian _ _ Crawford 

Fort, Amelia _ Stewart 

Fowler, Rebecca _ _ _ Clarke 
Gay, Johnnie _____ Toombs 
George, Helen Lorena _ Fulton 



Name County 

Gholston, Lucy _ _ _ _ Madison 
Gilbert, Gladys _ _ _ _ Laurens 

Ginn, Mary Sue Franklin 

Ginn, Nelle _____ Franklin 

Glass, Marian _ _ _ Henry 

Gleaton, Lucile _____ Crisp 

Goodwin, Theodosia Macon 

Griffin, Lily Mae _ _ Glascock 
Griner, Maggie _ _ _ Mitchell 
Guillebeau, Ina _ _ _ Lincoln 
Hale, Edna ______ Clarke 

Hall, Annie Sue Worth 

Hall, Lillie Mae _ _ _ Richmond 
Hardeman, Jessie _ _ _ Clarke 
Harper, Annie _ _ _ _ Oconee 

Harvey, Ruth Tattnall 

Harrison, Mayrelle Barrow 

Hartley, Annie Mary _ Wheeler 

Hicks, Rachel _ _ _ Bibb 

Hinely, Selma _ Effingham 

Hinton, Lucile _ _ _ _ Barrow 
Hogg, Elma _____ Webster 
Hogg, Nettyle _____ Marion 
Holcomb, •S'ue _____ Peach 
Holland, Lois _ _ _ _ Paulding 
Holland, Miriam _ _ Chattooga 
Hollowell, Edna _ _ _ Chatham 
Holt, Agnes --__,- Peach 
House, Winifred _ _ _ _ Wilkes 
Howell, Myrtice _ _ _ Mitchell 
Hudson, Elizabeth _ _ _ Toombs 

Hunter, Nina Oglethorpe 

Hursey, Maxie _ Jeff Davis 

Hyman, Neva _ _ _ _ Trutlen 

Irby, Ora Lou _ _ Meriwether 
Johnson, Etta Mildred _ Early 
Johnson, Juanita _ _ _ Clarke 
Jenkins, Mary _____ Bacon 

Johnson, Thelma _ _ _ Greene 
Jones, Cecil _______ Pike 

Jordan, Anne _____ Jackson 

Kennon, Sarah _ _ _ Muscogee 



74 



STATE NORMAL COLLEGE 



Name County 

Kicklighter, Me'llde Ruth _ _ 
Tattnall 

Kidd, Annie Mae Madison 

Kinney, Agnes _ _ _ - Carroll 

Kinnebrew, Corrie Clarke 

Kinney, Clara Bell _ _ Jackson 
Kirkland, Maud Lee - - Screven 
Kirbo, Nannie Sue _ _ Mitchell 

Lamar, Mary _ _ _ Clarke 

Leathers, Thelma _ _ _ Clarke 
Levine, Doris _____ Newton 
Lewis, Lura _____ Lincoln 
Littleton, Eloise _ _ _ Oconee 
Lane, L. C. _____ - Miller 
Lester, Mary _____ Clarke 
Lovett, Marguerite _ Meriwether 

McArthur, Emma Early 

McCay, Rama _ _ _ _ Madison 
McElhannon, LaWare _ Jackson 
McMath, Bertha _ _ _ Sumter 
McQuaig, Nina Mae _ Wheeler 
McRae, Virginia _ _ _ _ Bibb 
Markey, Martha _ _ Dougherty 
Marlowe, Myzelle _ _ _ Jackson 

Melson, Olive _ Clayton 

Merritt, Clara _ _ _ _ Gwinnett 

Mimbs, Maude _ _ _ _ Toombs 

Mock, Robbie _ _ _ _ Chatham 

Mobley, Ray _ _ _ _ Chattooga 

Moncrief, Nellie _____ Bibb 

Montgomery, Mary Sue _ _ Hall 
Moore, Martha _ - _ Madison 
Morris, Gladys _ _ Montgomery 
Morris, Winifred _ _ Gwinnett 
Morrison, Sara Louise _ _ _ 
_______ Montgomery 

Murray, Emmie _ _ _ . Crisp 
Newmeyer, Virginia _ DeKalb 
Newton, Peggy _ _ _ _ Coweta 

Nix, Edith Claire _ _ Gwinnett 
Nix, Edith Cornelia _ _ Jackson 
O'Kelly, Ilene _ _ _ _ Madioon 



Name County 

Osborne, Vesta - _ Washington 
Parker, Lora Pearl _ Wilkinson 
Parker, Ora Merle _ Wilkinson 
Parker, Louise _ _ _ _ Calhoun 

Pearson, Edith _ _ _ _ Troup 

Pearson, Frances _ _ _ Harris 
Pearson, Lucile _ _ _ _ Harris 

Peavy, Gertrude _ _ _ _ Peach 

Pentecost, Elizabeth _ Gwinnett 
Perry, Martha _ _ _ _ Mitchell 

Pettit, Clara Nell _ _ Pickens 
Pickett, Anne _____ Bibb 

Pittard, Evelyn _ _ _ Gwinnett 
Poindexter, Allene _ _ Calhoun 
Ponds, Lauree _ _ _ Richmond 
Pope, Ava ______ Clarke 

Porterfield, Marie _ _ _ Clarke 
Powers, Effie Mae _ _ Franklin 
Preetorius, Esther _ _ Bullock 
Ragsdale, Willie _ _ _ Paulding 

Ramsey, Martha Newton 

Rankin, Thelma _ So. Carolina 
Rauzin, Miriam _ _ _ _ Florida 
Reeves, Adela _ _ _ _ Clarke 
Richter, Mabel _____ Grady 
Richardson, Ruth _ _ _ Florida 
Riden, Emily _____ Morgan 
Rigdon, Clifford _ _ _ _ Lamar 
Roberts, Lucetta _ _ _ Hancock 
Roberts, Metta _ _ _ _ Paulding 

Roberts, Ora Lee Paulding 

Sanders, Martiele _ _ _ Fulton 
Sanders, Ruth _ _ _ _ Jackson 
Satlof, Anne _ _ _ _ Muscogee 

Scott, Dela Tattnall 

Scruggs, Jessie Jefferson 

Sewell, Hattie Louise Coweta 

Sewell, Martha _ _ Meriwether 
Shankle, Clare _ _ _ _ Jackson 
Shankle, Margaret _ _ Jackson 

Sharp, Mary Emily Columbia 

Shirley, Rozelle _ _ _ Franklin 



STATE NORMAL COLLEGE 



75 



Name County 

Shivers, Evelyn _ _ _ Randolph 
Sims, Mary Ellen _ _ _ Jackson 
Smoak, Rubye _____ Worth 
Smith, Amoretta _ Oglethorpe 
Sockwell, Mary _ _ _ _ Newton 
Sorrells, Margaret _ _ _ Clarke 
Spence, Winnie Sue_Meriwether 

Spooner, Ila Seminole 

Starr, Margaret _ _ _ _ Coweta 
S'tarr, Nan Nelle _ _ _ Barrow 
Starr, Ruth _____ Coweta 
Stephens, Annie _ _ _ Campbell 
Stephens, Cora _ _ _ Campbell 

Stephenson, Emily Stewart 

Stevens, Ruth _ _ _ _ Mitchell 
Stewart, lone _ _ _ _ Sumter 
Stinson, Mary _____ Talbot 
Stokes, Lucy ______ Bibb 

Storey, Helen Jackson 

Stubbs, Willa Mae Evans 

Swanson, Minnie _ _ _ Fayette 
Swanson, Naomi Vesta _ Fayette 
Teston, Clarice _ _ _ _ Florida 
Thornton, Myrtle _ _ _ Monroe 
Threlkeld, Eva _ _ _ Madison 
Thurmond, Esther _ _ _ Fulton 
Tidwell, Mayo _ _ - _ Douglas 
Tiller, Ruby _ _ _ _ Oglethorpe 
Tippins, Janie Louise _ _ Evans 

Toole, Ruby Bibb 

Turner, Amy Lizzie _ _ Jones 



Name County 

Van Wagner, Harry _ _ DeKalb 
Voyles, Lula _____ Jackson 

Wade, Elma Daisy Mitchell 

Waits, Grace _____ Jasper 
Waldrep, Kathleen _ _ Clarke 
Walraven, Gladys _ _ _ Gordon 

Wallace, Alda DeKalb 

Walling, Ned Tattnal! 

Watson, Addie Belle DeKalb 

Watts, Elizabeth _ _ _ Bartow 
Wells, Georgia _ _ _ _ Fulton 
Wells, Katherine _ Meriwether 
Whitehead, Aretha _ Emanuel 
Whitehead, Marjorie _ Calhoun 
Whittle, Claire _ _ _ _ Fulton 
Wiggins, Mildred _ _ _ Catoosa 
Williams, Ellie Willie _ _ _ 

_________ Taliaferro 

Williams, Eula Kate _ _ Crisp 
Williams, Margaret _ Gwinnett 
Williams, Winifred _ _ Worth 
Wise, Eva Mae _ _ _ _ Coweta 

Woeltjen, Marion _ _ Chatham 

Wood, Lou Etta Richmond 

Woodham, Martha _ _ Pulaski 
Womble, Daisy _____ Evans 

Wright, Beulah Taliaferro 

Wyche, Evelyn _ _ Meriwether 
Wyche, Sarah Louise _ _ _ _ 

________ Meriwether 

Wynne. Evelyn - - - - Wilkes 



FIRST YEAR DIPLOMA CLASS 



Acree, Joe _____ Stephens 
Alexander, Helen _ _ Jackson 
Andrew, Zira _ _ _ _ Wilkes 
Armstrong, Elizabeth _ _ Troup 
Armstrong, Lillian _ _ _ Harris 
Avant, Mae _ _ _ Washington 
Barber, Thelma _ _ _ Barrow 
Barker, Emmalyne _ _ _ Floyd 
Barker, Junaita _ _ _ _ Floyd 
Beaton, Stella _____ Ware 



Bell, Mabel Clair . 
Boatwright, Lucile 
Bowers, Rebu _ . 
Bray, Hassie _ _ 
Brown, Cleta _ _ _ 
Bullard, Bettie _ _ 
Calhoun, Mabel _ 
Carter, Margaret _ 
Cook, Margaret _ 
Chambers, Bertie . 



. _ _ _ Clay 

Wilkes 

_ Franklin 

_ Oglethorpe 

_ _ Chatham 

_ _ Mitchell 

. Bibb 

_ _ Chatham 

_ _ Laurens 

Washington 



10 



76 



STATE NORMAL COLLEGE 



Name County 

Chavous, Ozie E. _ _ Richmond 
Cheek, Frances _____ Bibb 
Chestnutt, Mildred _ _ Fulton 
Crocker, Thara _ _ _ _ Jackson 

Crooke, Ethel Richmond 

Cox, Bonnie _ Taylor 

Denmark, Frances _ _ Ben Hill 
Deriso, Frances _ _ _ _ Sumter 

Daniel, Emlyn _ _ _ _ Jackson 

Davis, Jewell _____ Terrell 

Dickens, Elizabeth _ - Hancock 
Dover, Ora ______ Gilmer 

Edenfield, Cleo _ _ _ _ Candler 

Edwards, Helen _ _ _ _ Evans 

Edwards, Mildred _ _ _ Talbot 
Gettys, Thelma _ _ _ _ Schley 

Green, Kate L. _ _ So. Carolina 

Gross, Katie Alabama 

Hairston, Thelma _ _ _ DeKalb 
Hancock, Frances E. _ Houston 
Hardin, Edith _ _ _ Columbia 
Hardin, Nell _ _ _ _ Columbia 

Harman, Thelma _ _ _ Carroll 
Harris, Sara Ruth _ _ _ Butts 
Henderson, Sarah _ _ _ Banks 
Hicks, Alice ______ Macon 

Hicks, Ethlene _____ Upson 

Higginbotham, Lucile _ Madison 
Hurt, Cornelia _ _ Oglethorpe 
Johnson, Gladys _ _ _ Mitchell 
Johnson, Leola _____ Troup 

Jones, Catherine _ _ _ _ Clark 

Jones, Marguerite _ _ _ Stewart 
Kellar, Winnie F. _ _ Stephens 
Kennedy, Muriel _ _ _ Laurens 
Kenny, Esther _ _ _ _ Jackson 

King, Helen Bibb 

Knox, Viola C - - Washington 
Langford, Kathleen _ _ Lamar 
Langston, Sarah _ _ _ Houston 

Lawrence, Mary Ellen Upson 

Lipsitz, Deborah _ _ _ Chatham 



Name County 

Little, Marjorie _ _ _ Hancock 
Livingston, Mary _ _ _ DeKalb 
Loyd, Carolyn _ _ _ _ Peach 
McCorkle, Annie _ _ _ _ Clay 
McFarlin, Sara _ _ _ _ Upson 
McLean, Cornelia _ _ Hancock 
McMath, Sue _____ Sumter 
Mansfield, Leola _ _ _ Wilkes 
Marvin, Ernistine - So. Carolina 

Maynard, Lois _ _ _ Bibb 

Maynard, Louise _____ Bibb 
Meadows, Evelyn _ _ _ Toombs 
Meadow, Hortense _ _ _ _ Clay 
Merritt, Sara _ _ _ _ Hancock 
Meyer, Myrle _ _ _ _ Houston 
Milner, Ethel _____ Harris 
Moore, Lourine _ _ _ _ Barrow 
Nash, Mary F. _ _ _ _ Lincoln 
O'Kelly, Helen _ _ _ Muscogee 
Osborne, Vondelle _ Washington 
Parker, Edith _ _ _ _ Berrien 
Parker, Mildred _ _ _ Screven 
Perkins, Miriam _ _ Jefferson 
Petropol, Ella _____ Clarke 

Petropol, Stella ; . - Clarke 

Reaves, Adela _ _ _ Florida 
Reville, Bernice _ _ Richmond 
Roberts, Evelyn _ _ _ _ Jasper 

Russell, Jeffie _____ Jones 

Rutledge, Margaret _ _ Talbot 
Sampler, Elizabeth _ _ _ Bibb 
Samples, Jannette _ _ Jefferson 
SJanders, Jetta ______ Clay 

Sanders, Neva ______ Clay 

Sherrer, Sallie Mae _ _ Madison 
Shirley, Willie Sue _ - Franklin 
Shirley, Hattie _ _ _ Franklin 
Smith, Annie ______ Hall 

Smith, Hallie _ _ Hall 

Smith, Mattilu _ _ _ _ Terrell 
Steed, Missouri _ _ _ _ Barrow 
Stevens, Gladys _____ Bibb 



STATE NORMAL COLLEGE 



77 



Name County 

S'wanson, Pauline _ _ _ Fayette 

Thaggard, Willie Evans 

Thompson, Florence _ _ Harris 
Thompson, Joyce _ _ _ Jasper 
Wagner, Louise Elizabeth _ _ 
__________ Jasper 



Name County 

Wells, Erne Maude Talbot 

Wheeler, Annie Lee _ _ Peach 
Wheeler, Gladys _ _ _ _ Peach 
Wheeler, Pauline _ _ _ Treutlin 
Wilson, Jewel H. _ _ Stephens 
Woolfork, Martha Sue _ Houston 



Brackett, Alvin 
Boatner, Vernon 
Griffith, Martha 
Jarrett, Chester 
Kirk, Lawrence 
Levy, Flora 
Merck, Alvi n 
Mills, Mildred 
Mitchell, Joanne 



TRAINING SCHOOL ROLL 
Pnrst Grade 

Prickett, Talmadge 
Prickett, Garret 
Sims, Edward 
Spratling, George 
Stephens, Evelyn 
Sanders, Dorothy 
Vaughn, Catherine 
Warwick, Dan 



/^7 



Almond, Musette 
Beckwith, Eloise 
Brooks, Mary Elizabeth 
Colley, Mildred 
Fields, Gordon 
Grant, Martha 
Guest, C. B. 
Hale, Roy 
Jarrett, J. D. 



Second Grade 

Landrum, Fleacia 
Parker, Betty 
Presnell, Grover 
Sims, David 
Smith, Alfredia 
Warwick, Mary 
Whitehead, Hazel 
Whitney, Nancy 
Wortham, Christine 



Bishop, Emmett 
Christian, L. H. 
Cone, Jim 
Couch, Ernest 
Doster, Olivia 
Eidam, Anita 
Guest, Rudolph 
Hale, Martha Lena 
Kenney, John 
King, Lucile 



Third Grade 

Kirk, Carrina 
Papa, Treasa 
Pound, Ralph 
Sims, Louise 
Sorrel Is, Alex 
Spratlin, Lillie 
Spratlin, Willie 
Stephens, Lois 
Upchurch, Hermond 
Waters, Richard 



78 



STATE NORMAL COLLEGE 



Beckwith, Miriam 
Brooks, Howard 
Bullock, Millie 
Cagle, Harold 
Callaway, Lucy 
Cooksey, Wilbur 
Dove, Lenora 
Hardy, Donald 
Hayes, Walter 
Heywood, Martha 



Aaron, Charles 
Almond, Leon 
Butler, Martha 
Cagle, Mildred 
Christian, Felton 
Couch, Harry 
Colson, G. L. 

Anderson, Catharine 
Autry, Grady 
Bevers, Henry 
Bishop, Julius 
Cooksey, Lorene 
Doster, Virginia 
Edwards, Charles 
Grant, C. W. 

Anderson, W. H. 
Almond, Mattie Sue 
Carney, Clarence 
Christian, Ora Lee 
Cone, Josephine 
Erb, Florrie Lee 
Guest, Cecil 
Hale, Lois 
Hale, Zettie Mae 

Anderson, J. T. 
Driskell, Velma 



Fourth Grade 

Lawrence, Allen Thomas 
Malcom, Hazel 
O'Kelley, Velma 
Smith, Richard 
Seagraves, Robert 
Sanders, Marie 
Stephens, W. L. 
Wortham, Rufus 
Warwick, Ha Mae 
Yearwood, Nell 

Fifth Grade 

Dunaway, Bertha 
Hale, Thomas 
Papa, Mary 
Pope, Howard 
Poss, Wilsie 
Pridgeon, Lucy 
Sell, Edward 

Sixth Grade 

Gunthrop, Alfred 
Hardy, Ned 
Kenney, Wi'lson 
Prickett, Jackson 
Underwood, Iduma 
Vaughn, Aubrey 
Whitehead, Carlton 
Whitehead, Winston 

Seventh Grade 

Kenney, Helen 
Lester, Guy 
Long, Elizabeth 
Nixon, Marvin 
Poss, Hazel 
Sanders, Mardell 
Saye, Evelyn 
Sorrells, Cleveland 
Thompson, Sara 

Eighth Grade 

Hardy, Nat 
Lavender, Margaret 



STATE NORMAL COLLEGE 



79 



Massey, Joe Lanier 
McElhannon, R. L. 
McElhannon, Thomas 
Pridgeon, Mary 

Bevers, Estelle 
Bond, Ruth Nelle 
Chappelle, Nelle 
Dillard, Virginia 
Hale, Eddie 
Massey, Leonard 



Alexander, Nancy 
Bennett, Mildred 
Huff, Mozelle 
Johnson, Annie Lene 
Maddox, Verna Mae 

Bart, Bertha 
Cagle, Lois 
Jackson, Frances 
Kingery, Lucile 
Langston, Marguerite 
May, Thelma 



Byrd, Esterleen 
Cody, Ralph 
Collins, Dell 
Collins, Nell 
Doster, William 

Byrd, Joe 
Cleveland, Coyel 
Cody, Benjamin 
Flanagan, Ernest 
Gunnells, LeRoy 

Bridges, Edward 
Burns, Elizabeth 
Colvard, Herschel 



Roguemore, John 
Roguemore, Nancy 
Wages, David 

Ninth Grade 

Metts, Mary 
Nixon, Pearl 
Pruett, Catherine 
Shackelford, Hazel 
Shackelford, Helen 
Yearwood, Mary 

Tenth Grade 

Massey, Ethelyn 
Mock, Frances 
Shackelford, Montine 
Stevens, Obie Glenn 

Eleventh Grade 

Moss, Kathryn 
Parham, Marquerite 
Quillian, Janie 
Shirley, Louise 
Watson, Elizabeth 

RURAL SCHOOL 
First Grade 

Iverson, Mary Frances 
Lester, Ruby 
Maynard, Reuben 
Winn, Edna 

Second Grade 

Johnson, James 
Lester, Ralph 
Rumsey, Mildred 
Smith, Ruby 

Third Grade 

Copeland, Jack 
Doster, Walter L. 
Flanagan, Horace 



80 



STATE NORMAL COLLEGE 



McClure, Mary Frances 
Nash, Mary Blanche 
Nash, Sara Ellen 

Allen, Albon 
Bridges, Clifton 
Burns, Edna 
Collins, Charles 
Fowler, Pinkie 
Griffith, Eva Mae 
Lester, John Willie 

Byrd, Melvin 
Cleveland, Grover 
Dunn, Edward 
Flanagan, Marvin 
Fowler, Louise 
Lester, Arthur 
Lester, Leon 



Burns, Telford 
Copeland, Francis 
Griffith, Ruby Lee 



Doster, Grace 
Driskell, Doyce 
Flanagan, Mary 
Lester, Salllie Lou 
Oldham, Grace 



Smith, Odell 
Threlkeld, Minnie Lou 
Watson, Vivian 
Fourth Grade 

Lester, Margaret 
Rice, Hope 
Rumsey, Willie 
Tate, Raymond 
Tate, Willie T. 
Watson, Mildred 
Williams, Wilmot 
Fifth Grade 

Lester, Oscar 
Maynard, Carlton 
Oldham, Doris 
Oldham, Francis 
Rumsey, Una 
ThrelkeldT Clayton 
Threlkeld, J. B. 

Sixth Grade 

Johnson, Jessie 
McClure, Janet 
Winn, Louise 

Seventh Grade 

Rumsey, Ina 
Wallace, Opal 
Watson, Stella 
Williams, Lucile 



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